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The Secretary of Agriculture, to whom the invitation was referred for consideration, states that there is much interest in this country in this forthcoming congress, and that it is the desire of the Department of Agriculture to be officially represented. He therefore recommends that a request be made of Congress for the enactment of legislation authorizing the acceptance of the invitation, the appointment of official delegates, and an appropriation of $10,000, to be expended under the direction of the Secretary of State, and based on a budget which he furnishes, as follows: Ocean transportation, 10 persons, at $600.

$6,000 Per diem, 10 persons, 30 days, at $8..

2, 400 Railroad fare (United States), 10 persons, average of $60 each

600 Railroad fare England and Scotland), 10 persons, average of $40 each.- 400 Local transportation (England and Scotland), 10 persons, average of $25 each

250 Baggage, telegraph, porterage, gratuities, etc., $35 each.

350 Total.--

10,000 In his note extending the invitation, the British ambassador stated as follows:

Great importance is attached to the development of the milk supply and it is believed that much practical benefit will be derived by all the nations and interests concerned from the discussions which will take place on questions relating to the production and consumption of milk and from interchange of the latest knowledge and experience in the solution of the problems presented during the progress of milk improvement.

Sharing in this belief and acting in accordance with the request of the Secretary of Agriculture, the undersigned, the Secretary of State, begs to submit a draft of a resolution which he recommends be transmitted to the Congress with a request for favorable consideration.

It is pointed out by the Secretary of Agriculture that this legislation should be enacted as early in the session as possible, and that the appropriation should be contained in the first deficiency act, since the invitation was not received in time to include the item in the Department of Agriculture's regular appropriation act for the fiscal year 1928, and the regular appropriation acts for the fiscal year 1929 may be passed too late to permit the appointment of delegates in time for them to make satisfactory steamship reservations, as the time of sailing would be during the rush tourist season.

It may not be out of place to mention that, in acceptance of an invitation extended by the Government of the United States, the British Ministries of Health and of Agriculture delegated representatives to attend the World Dairy Congress held in the United States in 1923. Participation in the forthcoming congress in Great Britain by the Department of Agriculture would, therefore, be reciprocal as well as in the public interest.

The undersigned is advised by the Director of the Bureau of the Budget that the request is not in conflict with the financial program of the President. Respectfully submitted.

FRANK B. KELLOGG. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 28, 1927.

DRAFT OF JOINT RESOLUTION

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President is hereby authorized and requested to accept the invitation of the British Government to the United States to appoint delegates to the Eighth International Dairy Congress, to be held in Great Britain during June-July, 1928.

Sec. 2. That the sum of $10,000, or as much thereof as may be necessary, is hereby authorized to be appropriated for the payment of the expenses of delegates, including transportation, subsistence or per diem in lieu of subsistence (notwithstanding the provisions of any other act), and such other expenses as the President shall deem proper.

CLAIM PRESENTED BY THE GOVERNMENT OF NORWAY

MESSAGE

FROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

TRANSMITTING

REPORT FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE RELATIVE TO A CLAIM PRESENTED BY THE GOVERNMENT OF NORWAY FOR PAYMENT OF INTEREST ON CERTAIN SUMS ADVANCED IN CONNECTION WITH ITS REPRESENTATION OF AMERICAN INTERESTS IN MOSCOW

JANUARY 5, 1928.–Read; referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations and

ordered to be printed

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State in relation to a claim presented by the Government of Norway for the payment of interest on certain sums advanced by it for this Government in connection with its representation of American interests in Moscow, and I recommend that an appropriation be authorized to effect a settlement of this claim in accordance with the recommendation of the Secretary of State.

Calvin CooliDGE. THE WHITE HOUSE,

January 5, 1928.

The PRESIDENT:

I have the honor to bring to your attention the request made by the Norwegian Government for the payment of interest on certain sums advanced by it for this Government in connection with its representation of American interests in Moscow.

The facts of the case may be briefly stated as follows:

In September, 1918, the Government of the United States requested the Norwegian Government to take charge of the protection of American interests in Moscow, stating that it would reimburse the Norwegian Government for the expenses incurred in carrying out this request.

The Norwegian Government accordingly authorized its vice consul at Moscow to assume protection of American interests at that place. Various expenses were incurred by the vice consul in connection with his protection of American interests, and the Norwegian Government, by December 8, 1920, had paid him the sum of Kr. 65,162.97, representing the amount of the expenses incurred by him with interest to the date of payment. The Norwegian Government thereupon re

. quested reimbursement by this Government of the sum of Kr. 65,162.97, with interest to the date of such reimbursement.

Due, in part, to the difficulty experienced by this Government in obtaining proper documentary evidence of the expenditures incurred by the vice consul, reimbursement was not made until July 13, 925, when the Comptroller General of the United States allowed the Norwegian Government the sum of Kr. 65,162.97, the amount paid by it to the vice consul, but disallowed the claim for interest.

The Norwegian Government, in acknowledging the receipt of the sum allowed by the Comptroller General requested that interest also be paid.

Because of the fact that reimbursement was not made until nearly five years after the funds had been advanced by the Norwegian Government, it is the view of this department that this Government should pursue a generous course in recognizing the assistance rendered it by a friendly foreign government in a time of emergency.

The interest claimed amounts to approximately $4,000, and I have the honor to recommend that the Congress be requested to authorize the appropriation of this sum in payment of the Norwegian Government's claim as an act of grace and without reference to the question of the legal liability of the United States.

A summary of the essential facts regarding the case being embodied in this communication, it is deemed unnecessary to accompany it with copies of the correspondence in the case. All or any part of that correspondence will, of course, be furnished should you or the Congress so desire.

It should be added that this claim was brought to the attention of the Sixty-ninth Congress in a message from the President dated April 23, 1926, printed in House Document No. 343, Sixty-ninth Congress, first session, and that House Joint Resolution No. 246, Sixty-ninth Congress, for the payment of this claim, was introduced on May 25, 1926, and was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs. No action was taken by the committee on this resolution.

It will be observed from the inclosed communication from the Director of the Bureau of the Budget, to whom the matter was referred, that the proposed action is not inconsistent with the financial program of this Government. Respectfully submitted.

FRANK B. KELLOGG. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, January 4, 1928.

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