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INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF ENTOMOLOGY

MESSAGE

FROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,

TRANSMITTING

REPORT FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE, TOGETHER WITH A RECOMMENDATION FROM THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE THAT A RESOLUTION BE ADOPTED REQUESTING THE PRESIDENT TO INVITE FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS TO BE REPRESENTED BY DELEGATES AT THE INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF ENTOMOLOGY TO BE HELD IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1928

DECEMBER 19, 1927.-Read; referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations,

and ordered to be printed

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State inclosing a recommendation from the Secretary of Agriculture that the Congress be requested to adopt a resolution authorizing and requesting the President to invite foreign governments to be represented by delegates at the International Congress of Entomology, to be held in the United States in 1928.

It will be noticed that because of the close relationship between entomology and agriculture the Department of Agriculture is especially interested in the international aspects of this science, which it considers of very great importance to this country. As it would seem, therefore, that the participation of foreign governments in the congress mentioned would be in the public interest, I recommend to Congress the passage of the joint resolution. No appropriation is requested.

CALVIN COOLIDGE. THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 19, 1987.
SD—70-1—vol 24-29

The PRESIDENT:

With a view to the submission of the request to Congress, if the President approve thereof, the undersigned, the Secretary of State, has the honor to lay before the President a copy of a letter from the Secretary of Agriculture, recommending the adoption by the Congress of a joint resolution, a draft of which he incloses, authorizing and requesting the President to extend invitations to foreign governments to be represented by delegates at the International Congress of Entomology to be held in the United States in 1928. No appropriation is requested.

În explanation of Secretary Jardine's letter, it may be stated that at his request the American diplomatic officers were authorized in June last to deliver, on behalf of the American organization committee of the International Congress of Entomology, which will be held at Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y., in 1928, an invitation addressed by that committee to foreign governments, but to make it clear to those governments that the Government of the United States had no connection with the Congress.

This action was taken on the strength of the following statement by Secretary Jardine:

Because of the close relationship between entomology and agriculture, this department (the Department of Agriculture) is especially interested in the international aspects of this science. It considers them of very great importance to this country. Respectfully submitted.

FRANK B. KELLOGG. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 19, 1927.

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE,

Washington, D. C., December 10, 1927. The SECRETARY OF STATE.

DEAR MR. SECRETARY: On June 17, 1927, I wrote you relative to the International Congress of Entomologists to be held in this country in August, 1928. Informal invitations to the various Governments have been forwarded by the Department of State. The importance of the congress would be emphasized and a fuller representation of Governments secured if the congress could be officially recognized by the Government of the United States.

If it meets with your approval, will you please take appropriate action along the lines suggested in the joint resolution hereto attached. Sincerely yours,

W. M. JARDINE, Secretary.

JOINT RESOLUTION Authorizing and requesting the President to extend invitations to foreign

governments to be represented by delegates at the International Congress of Entomology to be held in the United States in 1928

Resolved by the Senate and House of_ Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President be, and he is hereby, authorized and requested to extend invitations to foreign governments to be represented by delegates at the International Congress of Entomology to be held in the United States in 1928.

No. 30

CLAIMS OF AREND KAMP AND FRANCIS GORT

MESSAGE

FROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,

TRANSMITTING

A REPORT FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE REGARDING TWO

CLAIMS PRESENTED BY THE GOVERNMENT OF THE NETHERLANDS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES FOR COMPENSATION FOR TWO NETHERLANDS SUBJECTS INJURED WHILE THE U. 8. 8. CANIBAS WAS LOADING ON MAY 1, 1919, AT ROTTERDAM

DECEMBER 19, 1927.-Read; referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations and

ordered to be printed

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report regarding two claims presented by the Government of the Netherlands against the Government of the United States for compensation for personal injuries sustained by two Netherlands subjects, Arend Kamp and Francis Gort, while the U. S. S. Canibas was loading on May 1, 1919, at Rotterdam.

I recommend that, in order to effect a settlement of these claims in accordance with the recommendation of the Secretary of State, the Congress, as an act of grace and without reference to the question of the legal liability of the United States in the premises, authorize an appropriation in the sum of $1,000, $500 of which is to be paid to Mr. Arend Kamp and $500 to be paid to Mr. Francis Gort.

CALVIN COOLIDGE. THE WHITE HOUSE, December 19, 1927.

DECEMBER 17, 1927. The PRESIDENT:

I have the honor to submit, with a view to its transmission to Congress, the following report and recommendation regarding two claims presented by the Government of the Netherlands against the Government of the United States for compensation for personal injuries sustained by two Netherlands subjects, Arend Kamp and Francis Gort, while the U. S. S. Canibas was loading on May 1, 1919, at Rotterdam.

The U. S. S. Canibas, on May 1, 1919, was owned by the Government of the United States, controlled by the United States Shipping Board, manned by a Navy crew, and prior to the accident in question was.operated for the account of the War Department. At the time of the accident, however, naval stores were being transferred to the U. S. S. Canibas by means of a cargo net from the barge Johanna, which was a Dutch vessel chartered by the United States naval port office at Rotterdam. As one of the loads was being hoisted out of the hold of the Johanna by a windlass on the Canibas, the Netherlands subjects, Kamp and Gort, who were on board the Johanna endeavored to prevent the load from interfering with a stovepipe on the Johanna. The load was cleared from the stovepipe, when the rope parted and the load fell on the two men, injuring both severely.

The board of naval officers which convened on May 1, 1919, for the purpose of investigating the accident, rendered the following findings:

(1) Accident due to fall of loaded cargo net on Arend Kamp and Frans Gort through parting of fall.

(2) Parting of fall due to weakness in the fall, which might have been inherent or could have been developed during morning's operation,

(3) Responsibility can not be placed on any particular person inasmuch as the fall was apparently in good condition, from outside inspection, before this work started.

Under date of May 6, 1920, the Solicitor of the Navy Department, in a communication to the Secretary of the Navy, made the following Statement:

While it is doubtful that either of the two men have a legal claim against the United States, nevertheless it is believed that the doubts should be resolved in favor of the claimants and it is recommended that the record be referred to the War Department with the request that the claimants each be paid the sum of $500 in full of all claims on account of the injuries sustained, including hospital charges and medical attendance, under the provisions of an act to give indemnity for damages caused by American forces abroad (Public No. 133) approved April 18, 1918.

In a letter dated May 21, 1920, addressed to Mr. Kamp, by the United States naval staff representative's office at London, Mr. Kamp was informed that advice had been received from the Navy Department at Washington that he would be paid the sum of $500 on account of the injuries sustained by him on May 1, 1919, which sum was to include hospital expenses and medical attention.

Pursuant to the recommendation of the Solicitor for the Navy Department, the Acting Secretary of the Navy addresesd a memorandum to the Secretary of War requesting that Kamp and Gort each be paid the sum of $500 in full of all claims arising out of their injuries under the provisions of the act approved April 18, 1918.

However, the War Department, following a ruling of the Comptroller of the Treasury Department, rendered December 14, 1920, declined to pay the claims in question on the grounds that the injuries suffered by the claimants were the consequence of their own negligence and were not caused by the negligence of persons composing the military or naval forces of the United States and that the injuries could

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