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protection in the immediate locality where the crime was committed had been taken over by the Marine Corps, to some unidentified member or members of which grave suspicion, though not positive proof, points as the perpetrator, and the Navy Department recognizes that imputed responsibility of this Government rests upon considerations of equity rather than upon those of legal obligation under the precepts of international law.

It is reported that Richardson, who was about 28 years of age, was earning at the time of his death about $40 a month. He was unmarried and is survived by his parents.

A summary of the essential facts taken from the reports on file in the case being embodied in this communication, it is deemed unnecessary to accompany it with copies of the correspondence in the case, but all or any part of that correspondence will, of course, be furnished should the Congress so desire.

The Secretary of State acquiesces in the recommendation of the Secretary of the Navy and has the honor therefore to request the President to recommend to the Congress, as an act of grace and without regard to the question of legal liability, the authorization of an appropriation in the sum of $1,000 in payment of the claim of the British Government for the death of Samuel Richardson, a British subject, which resulted as the result of a bullet wound inflicted presumably by a member or members of the United States Marine Corps in Consuelo, Dominican Republic.

It will be noted from the inclosed communication from the Director of the Bureau of the Budget, to whom the matter was referred, that the proposed action is not inconsistent with the financial program of the Government. Respectfully,

CHARLES E. HUGHES. The PRESIDENT,

The White House.

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,

Washington. DEAR MR. SECRETARY: I have your letter of December 7, inclosing a copy of a proposed report to the President requesting that he recommend to Congress the authorization of an appropriation of $1,000 for the payment of a claim presented by the British Government for the death of Samuel Richardson, a British subject, and asking whether the proposed action is in harmony with the financial policy of the President.

It gives me pleasure to advise you that the proposed request for legislation authorizing an appropriation of $1,000 for the purpose stated is not in conflict with the financial program of the President. Sincerely yours,

H. M. LORD, Director. The SECRETARY OF STATE.

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CLAIM OF WILLIAM WISEMAN

MESSAGE

FROM

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

TRANSMITTING

REPORT FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE IN REGARD TO THE SERVICES IN BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES OF WILLIAM WISEMAN, BRITISH VICE CONSUL AT SALINA CRUZ, MEXICO, DURING THE PERIOD FROM APRIL 12, 1914, TO DECEMBER 13, 1917

DECEMBER 17, 1927.-Referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations and

ordered to be printed

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report from the Secretary of State in regard to the services in behalf of the United States of William Wiseman, British vice consul at Salina Cruz, Mexico, during the period from April 12, 1914, to December 13, 1917, when, with the permission of the British Government and at the request of this Government, he had charge of the American consulate at Salina Cruz and of American interests in the district surrounding that place. The conclusion reached by the Secretary of State has my approval, and I recommend that the Congress authorize an appropriation of $9,200 to be paid to Mr. Wiseman in recognition of the services which he so generously rendered

Calvin COOLIDGE. THE WHITE HOUSE,

December 17, 1987.

The PRESIDENT:

On April 12, 1914, the American vice consul at Salina Cruz left his post on leave of absence for a visit to the United States, leaving the consulate and American interests in that district in charge of William Wiseman, British vice consul. A few days after the vice consul's departure, political relations between the United States and

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Mexico and conditions in Mexico became so acute that he did not return, and an American consular officer was not sent to Salina Cruz until December 13, 1917. From April 12, 1914, to December 13, 1917, Mr. Wiseman, with the permission of the British Government, continued in charge of American interests for the district surrounding Salina Cruz. The disturbed political condition of Mexico made the care of American interests an exceedingly delicate and exacting task. In a report of the work done by Mr. Wiseman an American consul, who was assigned to Salina Cruz subsequent to the relinquishment of the care of American interests by Mr. Wiseman, said of him:

During a considerable portion of this period the work was undoubtedl; very heavy and exacting, requiring his entire time and energy for perhaps 18 hours a day for weeks at a time. There were many American refugees to be cared for and gotten out of the country and afforded suitable protection. * Many American vessels called at this port, either in distress or in ignorance of the acute political conditions, and it was Mr. Wiseman's duty, which he accomplished very successfully, to get them out of port again.

I have often heard the officers of American merchant vessels and other American citizens speak very highly of the manner in which Mr. Wiseman cared for American interests, and I have never heard any adverse criticism.

The only allowance which this Government made to Mr. Wiseman appears to have been for the expenses incurred by him in connection with his care of American interests. The fees collected by him for consular services on behalf of the United States were transmitted to this Government and duly deposited in the Treasury of the United States. It appears that he was informed that the question of compensation of his services would be reserved for future consideration.

It has been customary for the Government of the United States, upon the request of a friendly Government, to authorize its diplomatic and consular officers to take charge temporarily of the interests of that Government, and in such cases to decline to permit those officers to accept remuneration for their services. Foreign governments frequently lend the aid of their diplomatic and consular officers to the United States under like conditions. The case of Mr. Wiseman, however, appears to be exceptional. He was British vice consul at Salina Cruz, but the department is informed that he received no salary from the British Government. He was in business and was local manager for the Central & South American Telegraph Co., an American company, and his principal income was derived from his salary as manager. It is understood that the care of American interests over a period of some 44 months interferred materially with his private affairs, and doubtless resulted in personal loss. The circumstances appear to be so unusual and the period of his service for the United States so extended that it would seem that this Government could not properly do less in recognition of the value of his services than to present him, as an act of grace, with an amount which would appropriately compensate him. It is understood that the British Government would not object to this course.

Assuming, as I feel safe in doing, that the Congress will view with favor a proposal appropriately to compensate Mr. Wiseman, the amount which, in all probability, would have been paid to an American consul at Salina Cruz during the period herein mentioned would appear to be a fair measure of the pecuniary recognition of the services of Mr. Wiseman. The American consul who relieved Mr. Wiseman received $2,500 a year, and at that rate the total amount which should be paid to Mr. Wiseman in recognition of his services for the entire 44 months would be approximately $9,200.

It is the view of this department that in matters of this kind this Government should pursue a generous course in recognizing the assistance rendered it in the interest of this country by representatives of other Governments, and I therefore recommend that Congress be asked to appropriate for payment to Mr. William Wiseman, formerly British vice consul at Salina Cruz, the sum of $9,200 in recognition of his services in behalf of American interests in that place.

It will be noted from the inclosed communication from the Director of the Bureau of the Budget, to whom the matter was referred, that the proposed action is not in conflict with your financial program.

A report on this subject was transmitted to Congress by you on April 23, 1926. A copy of this report is inclosed. Respectfully submitted.

FRANK B. KELLOGG. DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, December 16, 1927.

BUREAU OF THE BUDGET,

Washington, December 6, 1927. MY DEAR MR. SECRETARY: I have from Assistant Secretary of State Carr a letter dated December 2, 1927, inclosing copy of a proposed report to the President regarding the payment of $9,200 to William Wiseman, British vice consul at Salina Cruz, Mexico, for services in behalf of the United States during the period from April 12, 1914, to December 13, 1917, and asking that I indicate whether the proposed appropriation is in harmony with the financial program of the President.

In reply I have to advise you that the proposed request for legislation authorizing an appropriation of $9,200 for the purpose stated is not in conflict with the financial program of the President. Sincerely yours,

R. O. KLOEBER, Acting Director. The SECRETARY OF STATE.

(House Document No. 344, Sixty-ninth Congress, first session)

To the Congress of the United States:

I transmit herewith a report from the Acting Secretary of State in regard to the services in behalf of the United States of William Wiseman, British vice consul at Salina Cruz, Mexico, during the period from April 12, 1914, to December 13, 1917, when, with the permission of the British Government and at the request of this Government, he had charge of the American consulate at Salina Cruz and of American interests in the district surrounding that place. The conclusion reached by the Acting Secretary of State has my approval, and I recommend that the Congress authorize an appropriation of $9,200 to be paid to Mr. Wiseman in recognition of the services which he so generously rendered.

CALVIN COOLIDGE. THE WHITE HOUSE, April 23, 1926.

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DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, April 20, 1926. The PRESIDENT:

On April 12, 1914, the American vice consul at Salina Cruz left his post on leave of absence for a visit to the United States, leaving the consulate and American interests in that district in charge of William Wiseman, British vice consul. A few days after the vice consul's departure, political relations between the United States and Mexico and conditions in Mexico became so acute that he did not return, and an American consular officer was not sent to Salina Cruz until December 13, 1917. From April 12, 1914, to December 13, 1917, Mr. Wiseman, with the permission of the British Government, continued in charge of American interests for the district surrounding Salina Cruz. The disturbed political condition of Mexico made the care of American interests an exceedingly delicate and exacting task. In a report of the work done by Mr. Wiseman an American consul, who was assigned to Salina Cruz subsequent to the relinquishment of the care of American interests by Mr. Wiseman, said of him:

During a considerable portion of this period the work was undoubtedly very heavy and exacting, requiring his entire time and energy for perhaps 18 hours a day for weeks at a time. There were many American refugees to be cared for and gotten out of the country and afforded suitable protection.

Many American vessels called at this port, either in distress or in ignorance of the acute political conditions, and it was Mr. Wiseman's duty, which he accomplished very successfully, to get them out of port again.

I have often heard the officers of American merchant vessels and other American citizens speak very highly of the manner in which Mr. Wiseman cared for American interests, and I have never heard any adverse criticism.

The only allowance which this Government made to Mr. Wiseman appears to have been for the expenses incurred by him in connection with his care of American interests. The fees collected by him for consular services on behalf of the United States were transmitted to this Government and duly deposited in the Treasury of the United States. It appears that he was informed that the question of compensation of his services would be reserved for future consideration.

It has been customary for the Government of the United States, upon the request of a friendly Government, to authorize its diplomatic and consular officers to take charge temporarily of the interests of that Government, and in such cases to decline to permit those officers to accept remuneration for their services. Foreign governments frequently lend the aid of their diplomatic and consular officers to the United States under like conditions. The case of Mr. Wiseman, however, appears to be exceptional. He was British vice consul at Salina Cruz, but the department is informed that he received no salary from the British Government. He was in business and was local manager for the Central & South American Telegraph Co., an American company, and his principal income was derived from his salary as manager. It is understood that the care of American interests over a period of some 44 months interfered materially with his private affairs, and doubtless resulted in personal loss. The circumstances appear to be so unusual and the period of his service for the United States so extended that it would seem that this Government could not properly do less in recognition of the value of his services than to present him, as an act of grace, with an amount

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