The Mexican Revolution: Counter-revolution and reconstruction

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U of Nebraska Press, 1990 - History - 679 pages
The Mexican Revolution was like no other: it was fueled by no vanguard party, no coherent ideology, no international ambitions; and ultimately it served to reinforce rather than to subvert many of the features of the old regime it overthrew. Alan Knight argues that a populist uprising brought about the fall of longtime dictator Porfirio Díaz in 1910. It was one of those "relatively rare episodes in history when the mass of the people profoundly influenced events." In this first of two volumes Knight shows how urban liberals joined in uneasy alliance with agrarian interests to install Francisco Madero as president and how his attempts to bring constitutional democracy to Mexico were doomed by counter-revolutionary forces. The Mexican Revolution illuminates on all levels, local and national, the complex history of an era. Rejecting fashionable Marxist and revisionist interpretations, it comes as close as any work can to being definitive.
 

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The Mexican revolution

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Based on his own extensive research on the role of foreign interests in the Mexican Revolution along with information drawn from recent monographs, Knight has written a solid narrative history of the ... Read full review

Contents

PORFIRIAN MEXICO I
1
THE OPPOSITION
37
POPULAR PROTEST
78
THE MADERO REVOLUTION
171
I THE REVOLUTION GOES ON
247
2 THE LIBERAL EXPERIMENT
388
Notes
491
Select bibliography
591
Index
603
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Alan Knight is Professor of Latin American History, Oxford University, and Director of the Latin American Centre, St. Antony's College, Oxford.

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