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THE

PICTORIAL HISTORY

OF THE

AMERICAN REVOLUTION;

WITH A

SKETCH OF THE EARLY HISTORY OF THE COUNTRY,

THF

CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES,

AND A CHRONOLOGICAL INDEX.

ILLUSTRATED WITH SEVERAL HUNDRED ENGRAVINGS.

TWENTY-SEVENTH THOUSAND.

NEW YORK: PUBLISHED BY ROBERT SEARS, 128 NASSAU STREET.

BURGESS, STRINGER, & CO.; W. H. GRAHAM; JUDD & TAYLOR-BOSTON: REDDING, & co.--PHILADEL

PHIA: ZEIBER, & co.; COLON & ADRIANCE.--BALTIMORE: SHURTZ & TAYLOR.-CINCINNATI: ROBIN SON & JONES. -LOUISVILLE: J. H. BAGBY-NEW ORLEANS: J. B. STEEL, & co.-MOBILE: T. P. MILLER, & Co.-CHARLESTON, S. C.: SILAS HOWE.-PENFIELD, GA: WM. RICHARDS.--ATHENS, GA: J.J. RICH ARDS. --AND SOLD BY BOOKSELLERS AND PERIODICAL AGENTS GENERALLY, THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES.

E208

4 sits

Entered, according to Act al Congress, in the year 1845,

ROBERT SEARS,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, for the Southern District of New York

EDUCATION DEPT.

PREFACE

No portion of the would's history can be more interesting to the present generation, than that recorded in this volume; and although of comparatively recent occurrence, it has acquired by neglect much of the freshness and fascination of novelty. The A DERICAN REVOLUTION is an event calculated to exercise a great influence on the present and future destinies of other nations.

To write an authentic “ HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION," is no light, irresponsible lask. We have endeavored to be impartial, and to be careful that no fact should be distorted, or receive a false coloring. Where, as is frequently the case, a considerable difference exists be. tween various authorities, we have endeavored to exercise an unbiased judgment, and to adopt that statement which appeared on the whole, most consistent with TRUTH. The greai principles of civil and religious freedom, the contest for which, in America, aroused the slumbering nations of Europe, can not fail engaging our ardent admiration ; and every Friend of Human Rights, at the present day, can have no hesitation in adopting the words of the immortal CHATHAM,“ I rejoice that they have resisted.At this moment, the whole English nation, which then, with a few hon. orable exceptions, was willing to aid her rulers in trampling on the necks of her transatlantic sons, is now sealing her approval of the principles which actuated American Patriots, by her own efforts to establish the truth, that“ Taxation, WITHOUT REPRESENTATION, IS TYRANNY."

In the preparation of a volume like the present, however, it is impossible to give universal satisfaction. Is it not enough that our fathers suffered, without the strife being bequeathed, as an heirloom, to their children? Wisdom suffers antipathies to die with the generation which has fostered them; and we believe that, were it not for the noxious influence of a portion of the periodi. cal press, both in America and England, the only rivalry between the two greatest countries op the face of the globe would be, in the knowledge and practice of those principles of moral and political science, which are adapted to promote the happiness and welfare of mankind at large. HISTORY requires a distant eminence, from which to take an impartial view of the character and transactions of the recording pen : but little more than half a century has now elapsed since the Colonists first asserted their independence ; and the generation, whose arduous struggles achieved so important a result, has passed away to the silent tomb. To give a just and impartial view of the rise, progress, and establishment of the American Republic, has been the design of the work. The editor has aimed to do justice without asperity ; to applaud patriotism, but not to justify its excesses ; to condemn tyranny, but not to overlook the virtues of many of its instruments; and to exhibit the kindly prospect of the FUTURE, more strongly than the irritating aspect of the PAST.

The study of History can not be appreciated too highly; it tells to the youth of our country a story full of wisdom, and replete with many a moral—it shows the influence and success of honor and virtue—that vice and dishonor go hand in hand together; and it excites them to noble deeds of patriotism, and calls upon them to do all, and suffer all, for their country.

To the Youth OF AMERICA, especially, the present Narrative is invaluable. It tells the price at which all their present rights were purchased-it teaches them their incomparable value ; and thus renders those in whose hands the destinies of America are hereafter to be intrusted, alive to every encroachment upon them. It relates to a country of greater extent, resources, and beauty, than is possessed by any other single nation under heaven ; and to a people, of recent origin in. deed, but developing immense powers, and making gigantic progress; to a people above all others interesting to the nations of Europe-presenting a refuge for their distressed children-exhibiting a noble example for their imitation; and as exercising no feeble influence on their destiny.

It is not, however, for Youth, alone, that this volume has been prepared. It has been written for All--for every age. To mankind at large the subject can not fail to be interesting; and if the preparation of these pages has been executed with a competent measure of industry, candor, and carefulness, they can scarcely fail of being valuable. These the editor has endeavored to ex. ercise, and he hopes not altogether without success.

R, s New York, May 1, 1846.

I

. 103

. 106

112

• 113

INTRODUCTION.

A.D.

PAOE

1729. Colony reverts to the Crown

100

EARLY HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN COLONIES.

Separation of North and South Carolina 100

A.D.

PAGE .

1732. Settlement of Georgia .

101

986–1015. Discoveries by the Ancient Northmen 1738. Spanish War breaks out :

102

Biarne Hierulfson's Voyage in 986 .

11 1:52. Georgia becomes a royal Colony.

Discoveries of Leif Ericson in 1000

12 Early Life of George Washington

105

Thorwald's Expedition, and Battle with the 1753. His Mission to the Western Territory.

Skrellings (Esquimaux)

13 1754. Plans for a Union of the Colonies

106

Settlement in Vineland,' by Thorfinn Karl- 1755. Expedition and Defeat of Gen. Braddock 109

setne.

14 1750. Success of the French under Montcalm.

Voyage of Freydísa, Helge, and Finnebaye 14 1757. Vigorous Measures of William Pitt

112
Ancient Relics discovered in New England 15 1758. Cession of Canada by France.
1492. Christopher Coluinbus sails in Search of a

1763. Progress of the Colonies in Population,

New World

19

Commerce, &c.

Mutiny on board his Vessel, and first Discov.

ery of Land

20

1493. Columbus' second Voyage

26

HISTORY OF THE REVOLUTION.

1498. Columbus' third Voyage

26

1508. Death of Columbus, May 15th

26

CHAPTER I.

1497-1525. Voyages of Sebastian Cabot

28

1499-1514. Voyages of Americus Vespuccius 28

Introductory Remarks .

115

1525-1542. Career or Hernando de Soto in Amer-

1765. Stamp Act passed.

117
29

1766. Meeting of the first Congress
1525. Discoveries of Giovanni Verazzano

Tumults in the Colonies .

35

1562. Voyage of John Ribault

38

Repeal of the Stamp Act

120

1584. Sir Walter Raleigh sends two Ships to

1767. New Taxes imposed

121

Fresh Troubles in consequence

America

1 22

42

Their Adventures with the Natives
1768. Non Importation Agreement

123
43
1585. Raleigh sends another Fleet to America

1769. Intemperance of the British Parliament. 123

45

Ralph Lane appointed Governor of Virginia 45

1770. (22d of April) Duties repealed: (5th March)

1566. Colony breaks up and returns to England

Boston Massacre

47

124

1615. Sir Walter Raleigh beheaded

Captain Preston

tried and acquitted

51

124

1606. Colony sent to America by James I. .

1772. (9th of June). The Gaspar Schooner burned 128

52

1607. Settlement of Jamestown.

(January). Assembly at Boston ; Indiscretion

54

of the Governor .

Difficulties with the Natives

56

128

Life of John Sinith saved by Pocahontas 58

CHAPTER II.

Arrival of Newport with a fresh Colony 61

1633. Colony of Maryland settled by Lord Balti- 1772. (16th of December). Destruction of Tea in

65 Boston Harbor.

1620. First successfui Effort to colonize New

1774. The Boston Port Bil.

130

England.

68 Arrival of Troops at Boston

133

Landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth 69 (251h of August) Writs issued for an Assem.

1625. Colony established near Cape Anne

72

bly at Salem ; (9th of September) coun-

1630. Fifteen Hundred Settlers sail from Eng.

termanded, but meets and resolves itself

land

74

into a Provincial Congress

133

Hostilities commence with the Natives

75 General Gage fortifies Boston Neck

133

Defeat and Death of King Philip

Suffolk Resolutions

134

1609. Voyages of Henry Hudson

78 Proceedings of Congress

1629. Settlement of Delaware

81 They publish a Declaration of Rights . 135

1646. Peter Stuyvesant appointed Governor of

Petition from Congress to the King

1 36

New Netherlands.

82 (26th of October). Dissolution of Congress 136

1664. Dutch Possessions surrendered to the Eng: Meeting of the Provincial Congress at Con-
hish

84

cord ; they adjourn to Cambridge

1680. William Penn obtains a Grant or lands in

Engage Minute Men

137

America,

86 A Committee of Safety and Supplies

137

1683. Penn forms a Treaty with the Indians

87 Hostile Resolution of the Provincial Congress 138

16-4-1718. His Difficulties with the Settlers 89 Exportation of the Military Stores from Brit-

1663. Liberal Grants by Charles II. of Territory

ain prohibited: Cannon removed by the

south of Virginia

93

People of Rhode Island

138

1665. Constitution for Colony of Carolina formed 94 Military Stores taken in New Hampshire , 138

.693. Constitution annulled

96 1775. General Agitation.

702. Attack on St. Augustine

96 Debates on American Affairs in Parliament · 139

War with the Indians

98 Provincial Congress

139

Internal Commotions

99 Colonel Leslie marches to Salem

139

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