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Mr. Dickinson to Mr. Seward.

No. 29.]

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES,

Nicaragua, September 13, 1862. SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith copies and translations of two notes with which my mess

ssenger has just arrived from the minister of foreign relations of this republic, expressive of the opposition of the government and people of Nicaragua to negro colonization within the borders of the republic. I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. B. DICKINSON. Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

Mr. Zeledon to Mr. Dickinson.

[Translation.]

NATIONAL PALACE,

Managua, September 12, 1862. Sir MINISTER: I have had the satisfaction to place before his excellency the president the communication of your excellency, in which you are pleased to manifest that the government of the United States does not entertain designs to colonize free negroes in the territory of Central America against the wishes of the people and government of this republic.

His excellency the president of Nicaragua is pleased to see confirmed the sentiments which he always expected of a government friendly and respectful of the rights of other people, in which hope he trusted, notwithstanding the rumors and publications which alarmed the people of Nicaragua. Through our minister in Washington he has already manifested to the government of the United States the repugnance of the people and government of Nicaragua to the establishment in her territory of colonies under the protection of another gov. ernment, and even without that, especially to the colonization of free negroes; but it may not be amiss here to repeat it to your excellency, which I now do in answer to your esteemned despatch above named.

I have the honor to remain, with sentiments of respect and esteem, your excellency's obedient'servant,

PEDRO ZELEDON.

[Translation.]

Mr. Zeledon to Mr. Dickinson.

(Confidential.]

MANAGUA, September 12, 1862. My Dear Sir: I have had the pleasure to receive your valued favor of the 10th instant, through our mutual friend, Don Pedro Alvarado, as also the official communication of the same date and substance, the answer to which accompanies this.

It is true that various publications in the newspapers of New York, inviting associations for colonization in Nicaragua without having obtained the sanction of this government, in connexion with the acts of the United States Congress, authorizing that government to procure transportation and colonize free negroes TT 3 Toten in TDP countries, and the design of the President to prefa

Lerica. 1252 **- a king of opposition among the people of NicaI stue - Lunars. And this government has, in order to prevent

I E DIC-12 nera to notify that government of its repug. *****57 L rng rssi chat the government of the United States Di Tin-Tour, the sovereignty and the territories of

1 ui ad letter, which I answer, is a gratifying ? 12 vui se government of Nicaragua has for that of

HI 1 Imenss of kindness and friendship which your sorun vak such good results. con present a your excellency my most distinguished az ide tient werint.

PEDRO ZELEDON. 1- Shay

ut de Cated States.

I seris Mr. Dickinson.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 6, 1862. * i Sytember 12 and 15 (Nos. 27 and 29) have been

suring the government of Nicaragua that its Imericans of African derivation within the

specte are approved. Zrmaga. copies of the correspondence on that 26. je terween his excellency Mr. Molina and

1 ay 30er to the Secretary of the Interior on the

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. 13. It Nicaragua.

Sadesues with So. 24.]
Be E. Smri September 19. 1862.

in. Spoember 24, 1862.
Seni Spoember 29, 1862.

s vetober I. 1862.

coder 1862.

Str. Dickinson,

DEPARTNEXT OF STATE,

Tashington, October 9, 1862. me or sur india a copy of an instruction of the 30th

un in contemplated colonization of persons of susset or shis department to several of the diplomatic

is tünel to governments of Europe who have

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. * . r, Nicaragua.

COSTA RICA, NICARAGUA, AND

NICARAGUA, AND HONDURAS.

Mr. Molina to Mr. Seward.

[Translation )

LEGATION OF Costa Rica, NICARAGUA, AND HONDURAS,

Washington, September 19, 1862. SIR : Referring to the interviews in which I have had the honor to manifest o your excellency and, in your absence, to the honorable Assistant Secretary f State the views of the republics of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Honduras, in reference to the project of establishing upon the territories of Central America :olonies of persons of color exported from these States, with the aid of the reources decrced for the purpose by the last Congress, I deem it my duty and, n conformity with the frankness and the friendly spirit of the repeated interriews to which I refer, to reduce to writing what has taken place at them, and he understanding which has resulted therefrom.

I flatter myself that your excellency does justice to the motives of the elabo ate effort with which I have endeavored to avoid a controversy in writing nd thus to divert your important attention, under circumstances in which, vrobably, it is occupied, from affairs more urgent and transcendental to your ountry. I write the present at the request of the honorable Assistant Secretary f State, and in the confidence of having brought about a perfect understanding ounded upon the good faith, the equity, and the justice which the present adainistration has proposed to itself as the guide of its policy, especially in its preign relations so fortunately confided to your excellency.

About the middle of June last, having been informed through private though eliable sources that it was formally contemplated to carry into effect the aforcventioned colonization into the territories of Central America, and especially pon the isthmus of Chiriqui, I had the honor to inform your excellency that one of the governments which I represent would consent to the formation upon s territory of independent colonies, whatever might be their color and place of eparture, nor under the auspices and protection of any foreign government; hat they desire and are disposed to promote the immigration of industrious ersons, and capable of contributing to the improvement and advancement of he country, and of identifying themselves with the inhabitants, under the exlusive control of its laws; and they reserve to themselves the right of reguiting the matter as may suit them, and the exercise of the other rights which ppertain to them as sovereign states; and that the project in question, even apposing that it did not tend to give an inadmissible character of independence , the colony, would not meet with the favor in Central America, of whose erritories it seemed to dispose of, without notice to, nor the consent of, the roprietors, for the purpose of importing a plague of which the United States esire to rid themselves. Your excellency seemed to appreciate the natural ttitude of the governments which I represent by assuring me that the United tates do not intend to establish independent colonies, nor to send colonists to 'entral America, without previously obtaining the consent of the respective

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under its protection in suitable countries, and the design of the President to prefer Central America, have excited a feeling of opposition among the people of Nicaragua against such colonization. And this government has, in order to prevent it, instructed its minister in Washington to notify that government of its repug. nance to consent to it, being persuaded that the government of the United States respects, and will respect, for its own honor, the sovereignty and the territories of the Spanish-American nationalities.

Therefore, your esteemed despatch and letter, which I answer, is a gratifying confirmation of the opinion which the government of Nicaragua has for that of the United States, and the sentiments of kindness and friendship which your excellency cultivates in Nicaragua with such good results.

I take the present occasion to present to your excellency my most distinguished regards, and remain your obedient servant.

PEDRO ZELEDON. Mr. A. B. DICKINSON,

Minister resident of the United States.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Dickinson.

No. 24.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 6, 1862. SIR: Your despatches of September 12 and 15 (Nos. 27 and 29) have been received. Your proceedings in assuring the government of Nicaragua that its objection to the colonization of Americans of African derivation within the limit of that republic will be respected are approved.

I give you, for your better information, copies of the correspondence on that subject, which has taken place here between his excellency Mr. Molina and this department, and a copy of my letter to the Secretary of the Interior on the same subject. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. A. B. Dickinson, Esq., gc., gc., fr., Nicaragua.

(Enclosures with No. 24.]
Mr. Molina to Mr. Seward, September 19, 1862.
Mr. Seward to Mr. Molina, September 24, 1862.
Mr. Molina to Mr. Seward, September 29, 1862.
Mr. Seward to Mr. Molina, October 1, 1862.
Mr. Seward to Mr. Smith, October 6, 1862.

Mr. Seward to Mr. Dickinson,

No. 25.)

DEPARTMENT OF STATE,

Washington, October 9, 1862. Sir: I transmit for your information a copy of an instruction of the 30th September, upon the subject of the contemplated colonization of persons of African extraction, addressed by this department to several of the diplomatic agents of the United States, accredited to governments of Europe who have possessions within the tropics. I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, ANDREW B. DICKINSON, Esq., sc., fr., &c., Nicaragua.

COSTA RICA, NICARAGUA, AND HONDURAS.

Mr. Molina to Mr. Seward.

[Translation)

LEGATION of Costa Rica, NICARAGUA, AND HONDURAS,

Washington, September 19, 1862. Sir:

: Referring to the interviews in which I have had the honor to manifest to your excellency and, in your absence, to the honorable Assistant Secretary of State the views of the republics of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Honduras, in reference to the project of establishing upon the territories of Central America colonies of persons of color exported from these States, with the aid of the resources decreed for the purpose by the last Congress, I deem it my duty and, in conformity with the frankness and the friendly spirit of the repeated interviews to which I refer, to reduce to writing what has taken place at them, and the understanding which has resulted therefrom.

I flatter myself that your excellency does justice to the motives of the elabo rate effort with which I have endeavored to avoid a controversy in writing and thus to divert your important attention, under circumstances in which, probably, it is occupied, from affairs more urgent and transcendental to your country. I write the present at the request of the honorable Assistant Secretary of State, and in the confidence of having brought about a perfect understanding founded upon the good faith, the equity, and the justice which the present administration has proposed to itself as the guide of its policy, especially in its foreign relations so fortunately confided to your excellency.

About the middle of June last, having been informed through private thongh reliable sources that it was formally contemplated to carry into effect the aforcmentioned colonization into the territories of Central America, and especially upon the isthmus of Chiriqui, I had the honor to inform your excellency that none of the governments which I represent would consent to the formation upon its territory of independent colonies, whatever might be their color and place of departure, nor under the auspices and protection of any foreign government; that they desire and are disposed to promote the immigration of industrious persons, and capable of contributing to the improvement and advancement of the country, and of identifying themselves with the inhabitants, under the exclusive control of its laws; and they reserve to themselves the right of regulating the matter as may suit them, and the exercise of the other rights which appertain to them as sovereign states; and that the project in question, even supposing that it did not tend to give an inadmissible character of independence to the colony, would not meet with the favor in Central America, of whose territories it seemed to dispose of, without notice to, nor the consent of, the proprietors, for the purpose of importing a plague of which the United States desire to rid themselves. Your excellency seemed to appreciate the natural attitude of the governments which I represent by assuring me that the United States do not intend to establish independent colonies, nor to send colonists to Central America, without previously obtaining the consent of the respective

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