The Naval and Military Magazine, Volume 3

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T. Clerc Smith, 1828 - Great Britain
 

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Page 484 - It is as well as it is. I had rather it should go out of the field with me ;" and in that manner, so becoming to a soldier, Moore was borne from the fight.
Page 486 - Opposing sound military views to the foolish projects so insolently thrust upon him by the ambassador, he conducted his long and arduous retreat with sagacity, intelligence, and fortitude ; no insult disturbed, no falsehood deceived him, no remonstrance shook his determination; fortune frowned without subduing his constancy ; death struck, but the spirit of the man remained unbroken when his shattered body scarcely...
Page 98 - I am to acquaint you, that his royal highness the prince regent has been pleased, in the name and on the behalf of his majesty, to approve and confirm the finding -and sentence of the court.
Page clxii - Provided always, and be it further enacted. That nothing in this act shall extend or be construed to extend to the publication of banns, nor to notice of the celebration of divine service or of sermons...
Page 486 - ... preserved by the decisive vigour of his actions. He maintained the right with a vehemence bordering upon fierceness; and every important transaction in which he was engaged increased his reputation for talent, and confirmed his character, as a stern enemy to vice, a steadfast friend to merit — a just and faithful servant of his country. The honest loved him, the dishonest feared him; for while he lived he did not shun, but scorned and spurned the base — and with characteristic propriety,...
Page 76 - The veteran, with the stripling of a day. The nameless trooper, and the leader of a hundred hosts. Friend lies by friend. The steed with his rider. And foes, linked in their long embrace — their first and last — the gripe of death. Far o'er the field they lie, a gorgeous prey to ruin ! White plume and steel morion...
Page 486 - Thus ended the career of sir John Moore, a man whose uncommon capacity was sustained by the purest virtue, and governed by a disinterested patriotism more in keeping with the primitive than the luxurious age of a great nation. His tall graceful person, his dark searching eyes, strongly denned forehead, and singularly expressive mouth, indicated a noble disposition and a refined understanding.
Page 484 - Elvina, was struck on the left breast by a cannon-shot ; the shock threw him from his horse with violence, but he rose again in a sitting posture, his countenance unchanged, and his steadfast eye still fixed upon the regiments engaged in his front, no sigh betraying a sensation of pain.
Page 411 - It was expected, from this alternation, that they would possess, in an eminent degree, the advantage of sailing; that, separately, they would be superior to any single European frigate of the usual dimensions; that, if assailed by numbers, they would be always able to lead ahead; that they could never be obliged to go into action but on their own terms, except in a calm; and that, in heavy weather, they would be capable of engaging double-decked ships. These are the principal advantages contemplated...
Page 167 - Captain , because I considered him a " diligent, attentive, and skilful officer; butthecon" duct which is imputed to him has always met my " decided reprobation, as being big with the most " dangerous consequences, and subversive of all real " discipline." When the offence was of such a nature that the necessity of corporal punishment was manifest, Captain Collingwood was present, as is customary, but suffering from his wounded feelings greater pain probably than the culprit himself; and on these...

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