The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, Volume 52

Front Cover
A. and C. Black, 1852 - Science
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 91 - Memmi. arma antiqua manus ungues dentesque fuerunt et lapides et item silvarum fragmina rami, et flamma atque ignes, postquam sunt cognita primum. : >Ss posterius ferri vis est aerisque reperta. et prior aeris erat quam ferri cognitus usus, quo facilis magis est natura et copia maior.
Page 302 - If brethren dwell together, and one of them die, and have no child, the wife of the dead shall not marry without unto a stranger: her husband's brother shall go in unto her, and take her to him to wife, and perform the duty of an husband's brother unto her.
Page 92 - It is drawn, and cometh out of the body; yea, the glittering sword cometh out of his gall: terrors are upon him.
Page 76 - Son of man, the house of Israel is to me become dross: all they are brass, and tin, and iron, and lead, in the midst of the furnace ; they are even the dross of silver.
Page 335 - Pharaohs, and in rocky folds of Lebanon still untouched by the tool. So long as Ocean exists, there must be disintegration, dilapidation, change ; and should the time ever arrive when the elevatory agencies, motionless and chill, shall sleep within their profound depths, to awaken no more, — and should the sea still continue to impel its currents and to roll its waves, — every continent and island would at length disappear, and again, as of old, " when the fountains of the great deep were broken...
Page 303 - Ye are forbidden to marry your mothers, and your daughters, and your sisters, and your aunts both on the father's and on the mother's side, and your brother's daughters, and your sister's daughters, and your mothers who have given you suck, and your foster-sisters, and your wives...
Page 66 - Assuming, therefore, that the sun's light is the result of some peculiar action by which it brings forth into visible existence the element of light, which I conceive to be latent in and diffused throughout space, we have but to imagine the existence of a very probable condition ; namely, the unequal diffusion of this light-yielding element, to catch a glimpse of a reason why our sun may, in common with his solar brotherhood, in some portions of his vast stellar orbit, have passed, and may yet have...
Page 335 - Reasoning from what we know,' — and what else remains to us? — an earth without a sea would be an earth without rain, without vegetation, without life, a dead and doleful planet of waste places, such as the telescope reveals to us in the moon. And yet the Ocean does seem peculiarly a creature of time, — of all the great agents of vicissitude and change, the most influential and untiring ; and to a state in which there shall be no vicissitude and no change, — in which the earthquakes shall...
Page 222 - And life, in rare and beautiful forms, Is sporting amid those bowers of stone, And is safe when the wrathful spirit of storms Has made the top of the wave his own...
Page 334 - ... stillness amid the calm of the arid and rainless desert, where no spring rises and no streamlet flows, and the long caravan plies its weary march amid the blinding glare of the sand, and the red unshaded rays of the fierce sun. But once and again, and yet again, has the roar of Ocean been there. It is his sands that the winds heap up ; and it is the skeleton remains of his vassals — shells, and fish and the stony coral — that the rocks underneath enclose.

Bibliographic information