SPEECHES DELIVERED AT A DINNER GIVEN TO THE HON. DANIEL WEBSTER BY THE REFORM CONVENTION OF MARYLAND, AT ANNAPOLIS, TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 1851

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Page 4 - ... accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the Palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned, and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our Country from the rest, or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.
Page 4 - In all our deliberations on this subject we kept steadily in our view that which appears to us the greatest interest of every true American, the consolidation of our Union, in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence.
Page 5 - Webster resumed : " Mr. President and gentlemen : In the lapse of years, and in the rising of one generation after another, it may very possibly happen, and we are sure that it does happen, and has happened, that the exact principles of the union of these States are not always properly conceived.
Page 11 - JUSTUM et tenacem propositi virum Non civium ardor prava jubentium, Non vultus instantis tyranni Mente quatit solida, neque Auster, Dux inquieti turbidus Adriae, 5 Nee fulminantis magna manus Jovis : Si fractus illabatur orbis, * Impavidum ferient ruinae.
Page 8 - ... I think that their feelings have become entirely diseased. I think that they know not what they do. And yet, gentlemen, I do not think it the part of prudence to criminate, or taunt, or to provoke. Leave them to their own consideration. Let them drink in secession many days, and inwardly digest it. And, so far as I have any voice in the councils of the country, this meditation of theirs shall never be disturbed ; not a breath shall ruffle their sensibility until it comes to a point where something...
Page 6 - CROMWELL or of HENRY VANE, whoever he was, feel any less confidence in the integrity and entire patriotism of CHARLES CARROLL, because he was a catholic ? Not at all. Nor did Maryland hesitate to accord the meed of patriotism, whenever it was due, to the ADAMSES, to ALEXANDER HAMILTON, to RUFUS KING, or whoever else belonged to the North, because they were of different sentiments in religion.
Page 6 - ... North, because they were of different sentiments in religion. Their association was political. It was founded upon general policy and union, a sort of confederacy, at that time, to resist the common enemy, and do whatsoever was necessary for the common good. Gentlemen, I hope, for one, never to see the original idea departed from.
Page 6 - The people of the North were not only Protestants but Dissenters. They were of the school of Cromwell and Sir Henry Vane. But what of that ? When all these colonies came together for the general purpose of defence against a common enemy, what did they do ? Did they seek to merge, and confound, and consolidate all these States into one great community ? No such thing. They meant to unite upon those objects which were necessary for the common defence ; and they meant to leave everything else in the...
Page 9 - I hold the importance of maintaining these measures to be of the highest character and nature, every one of them, out and out, and through and through. I have no confidence in anybody who seeks to repeal, or anybody who wishes to alter or modify these constitutional provisions. There they are. Many of these great measures are irrepealable. The settlement with Texas is as irrepealable as the admission of California.
Page 5 - In the lapse of years, and in the rising of one generation after another, it may very possibly happen, and we are sure that it does happen, and has happened, that the exact principles of the Union of these States are not always properly understood. It may not be amiss...

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