Source-book of American History: Ed. for Schools and Readers

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Albert Bushnell Hart
Macmillan, 1899 - United States - 408 pages
This book offers a survey of American history, from the earliest colonial times through the Spanish-American War. The source book is directed at an adolescent crowd, and contains further explanations in the margins. The subject matter is rather balanced between political, military, and societal events and trends.
 

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Page 163 - He is an American, who leaving behind him all his ancient prejudices and manners, receives new ones from the new mode of life he has embraced, the new government he obeys, and the new rank he holds. He becomes an American by being received in the broad lap of our great Alma Mater. Here individuals of all nations are melted into a new race of men, whose labors and posterity will one day cause great changes in the world.
Page 200 - And your covenant with death shall be disannulled, And your agreement with hell shall not stand ; When the overflowing scourge shall pass through, Then ye shall be trodden down by it.
Page 272 - Ez fer war, I call it murder, — There you hev it plain an' flat; I don't want to go no furder Than my Testyment fer that; God hez sed so plump an' fairly, It's ez long ez it is broad, An' you've gut to git up airly Ef you want to take in God.
Page 200 - For the bed is shorter than that a man can stretch himself on it : and the covering narrower than that he can wrap himself in it.
Page 317 - ... and forever free and the executive government of the united states including the military and naval authority thereof will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons and will do no act or acts to repress such persons or any of them in any efforts they may make for their actual freedom...
Page 329 - I claim not to have controlled events, but confess plainly that events have controlled me. Now, at the end of three years' struggle, the nation's condition is not what either party or any man desired or expected.
Page 285 - That the Constitution, and all the laws of the United States which are not locally inapplicable, shall have the same force and effect within the said territory of Nebraska as elsewhere within the United States...
Page 359 - OUR fathers' God! from out whose hand The centuries fall like grains of sand, We meet to-day, united, free, And loyal to our land and Thee, To thank Thee for the era .done, And trust Thee for the opening one.
Page 335 - His was no lonely mountain-peak of mind, Thrusting to thin air o'er our cloudy bars, A sea-mark now, now lost in vapors blind; Broad prairie rather, genial, level-lined, Fruitful and friendly for all human kind, Yet also nigh to Heaven and loved of loftiest stars.
Page 328 - Constitution ? By general law, life and limb must be protected, yet often a limb must be amputated to save a life, but a life is never wisely given to save a limb. I felt that measures, otherwise unconstitutional, might become lawful by becoming indispensable to the preservation of the Constitution through the preservation of the nation.

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