Giovanni's Gift

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Viking, 1997 - Fiction - 325 pages
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Imagine a scene of rural serenity, a night scene. Above the mountains surrounding this faraway place, the stars are a menagerie of silver flickering motes. Imagine a solitary ranch, a man and a woman asleep. It would be hard to fathom a purer vision of people at peace in the natural world. Who could foresee that this tranquility would be so brutally shattered by the night visitors?
When Grant hears of the campaign of malice being waged against his only living relatives, he abandons Rome and a crumbling marriage to do what he can to help them. His brash confidence is quickly bruised as the night visits escalate in violence, and the death of Giovanni Trentas, a dear family friend found mutilated in a gorge above the ranch, takes on new meaning. When his aunt presents him with Giovanni's legacy - an old cigar box filled with letters, photos, and seemingly random knick-knacks - Grant finds himself in possession of a puzzle that might hold the answers to much more than Giovanni's death. Grant's unfolding passion for Giovanni's daughter, Helen, forces him to choose between loyalty and love as the night terrors come to their catastrophic end.

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GIOVANNI'S GIFT

User Review  - Kirkus

An elegant unveiling of the dark secrets that often lie submerged beneath grim events, from the novelist whose earlier inclinations toward the gothic (Trinity Fields, 1995; The Almanac Branch, 1991 ... Read full review

Giovanni's gift

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Morrow, whose The Almanac Branch (LJ 5/15/91) was a PEN/Faulkner Award finalist, weighs in with a thriller. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
19
Section 3
31
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

Bradford Morrow is a professor of literature and a Bard Center Fellow at Bard College.

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