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APPENDIX.

VARIOUS PROCLAMATIONS, LETTERS, ETC., OF PRESIDENT LINCOLN,

NOT CONTAINED IN THE BODY OF THE WORK.

RESPECTING SOLDIERS ABSENT WITHOUT LEAVE.
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-A PROCLAMATION.

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

WASHINGTON, March 10, 1863. In pursuance of the twenty-sixth section of the act of Congress, entitled an act for enrolling and calling out the National forces, and for other purposes, approved on the third of March, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, I, Abraham Lincoln, President and Commander-in-chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, do hereby order and command that all soldiers enlisted or drafted into the service of the United States, now absent from their regiments without leave, shall forth with return to their respective regiments; and I do hereby declare and proclaim that all soldiers now absent from their respective regiments without leave, who shall, on or before the first day of April, 1863, report themselves at any rendezvous designated by the general orders of the War Department, No.58, hereto annexed, may be restored to their respective regiments without punishment, except the forfeiture of pay and allowances during their absence; and all who do not return within the time above specified, shall be arrested as deserters, and punished as the law provides ;

AND WHEREAS, Evil-disposed and disloyal persons, at sundry places, have enticed and procured soldiers to desert and absent themselves from their regiments, thereby weakening the strength of the armies and prolonging the war, giving aid and comfort to the enemy, and cruelly exposing the gallant and faithful soldiers remaining in the ranks to increased hardships and dangers;

I do, therefore, call upon all patriotic and faithful citizens to oppose and resist the aforementioned dangerous and treasonable crimes, and aid in restoring to their regiments all soldiers absent without leave, and assist in the execution of the act of Congress for “enrolling and calling out the National forces,

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and for other purposes," and to support the proper authorities in the prosecution and punishment of offenders against said act, and aid in suppressing the insurrection and the rebellion.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand.

Done at the city of Washington, this tenth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-seventh. By the President:

ABRAHAM LINCOLN. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

A NATIONAL FAST.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION.

WHEREAS, The Senate of the United States, devoutly recognizing the supreme authority and just government of Almighty God, in all the affairs of men and of nations, has, by a resolution, requested the President to designate and set apart a day for National prayer and humiliation;

AND WHEREAS, It is the duty of nations, as well as of men, to own their dependence upon the overruling power of God, to confess their sins and transgressions in humble sorrow, yet with assured hope that genuine repentance will lead to mercy and pardon, and to recognize the sublime truth announced in the Holy Scriptures, and proven by all history, that those nations only are blessed whose God is the Lord;

And, insomuch as we know that, by His divine law, nations, like individuals, are subjected to punishments and chastisements in this world, may we not justly fear that the awful calamity of civil war, which now desolates the land, may be but a punishment inflicted upon us for our presumptuous sins, to the needful end of our National reformation as a whole people ? We have been the recipients of the choicest bounties of Ileaven. We have been preserved, these many years, in peace and prosperity. We have grown in numbers, wealth, and power, as no other nation has ever grown. But we have forgotten God. We have forgotten the gracious hand which preserved us in peace, and multiplied and enriched and strengthened us; and we have vainly imagined, in the deceitfulness of our hearts, that all these blessings were produced by some superior wisdom and virtue of our own. Intoxicated with unbroken success, we have become too self-sufficient to feel the necessity of redeeming and preserving grace, too proud to pray to the God that made us !

It behooves us, then, to humble ourselves before the offended Power, to confess ous National sins, and to pray for clemency and forgiveness.

Now, therefore, in compliance with the request, and fully con

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curring in the views of the Senate, I do, by this my proclamation, designate and set apart Thursday, the thirtieth day of April, 1863, as a day of National humiliation, fasting, and prayer. And I do hereby request all the people to abstain on that day from their ordinary secular pursuits, and to unite, at their several places of public worship and their respective homes, in keeping the day holy to the Lord, and devoted to the humble discharge of the religious duties proper to that solemn occasion.

All this being done, in sincerity and truth, let us then rest humbly in the hope, authorized by the Divine teachings, that the united cry of the nation will be heard on high, and answered with blessings, no less than the pardon of our National sins, and restoration of our now divided and suffering country to its former happy condition of unity and peace.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, on this thirtieth day [L. s.]

of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the Independence of

the United States the eighty-seventh. By the President:

ABRAHAM LINCOLN. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

THE DRAFT-A PROCLAMATION BY THE PRESIDENT.

WASHINGTON, May 8, 1863.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA- PROCLAMATIOX.

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WHEREAS, The Congress of the United States, at its last session, enacted a law, entitled “An act for enrolling and calling out the National forces, and for other purposes," which was approved on the 3d day of March last; and

WHEREAS, It is recited in the said act that there now exists in the United States an insurrection and rebellion against the authority thereof, and it is, under the Constitution of the United States, the duty of the Government to suppress insubordination and rebellion, to guarantee to each State a republican form of government, and to preserve the public tranquillity; and

WHEREAS, For these high purposes, a military force is indispensable, to raise and support which all persons ought willingly to contribute ; and

WHEREAS, No service can be more praiseworthy and honorable than that which is rendered for the maintenance of the Constitution and the Union, and the consequent preservation of free government; and

WHEREAS, For the reasons thus recited it was enacted by

the said statute that all able-bodied male citizens of the United States, and persons of foreign birth who shall have declared on oath their intentions to become citizens under and in pursuance of the laws thereof, between the ages of twenty and forty-five years, with certain exemptions not necessary to be

here mentioned, are declared to constitute the National forces, and shall be liable to perform military duty in the service of the United States, when called out by the President for that purpose; and

WHEREAS, It is claimed, on and in behalf of persons of foreign birth, within the ages specified in said act, who have heretofore declared on oath their intentions to become citizens under and in pursuance to the laws of the United States, and who have not exercised the right of suffrage, or any other political franchise under the laws of the United States, or of any of the States thereof, that they are not absolutely precluded by their aforesaid declaration of intention from renouncing their purpose to become citizens; and the

on the contrary, such persons, under treaties and the law of nations, retain a right to renounce that purpose, and to forego the privilege of citizenship and residence within the United States, under the obligations imposed by the aforesaid act of Congress :

Now, therefore, to avoid all misapprehensions concerning the liability of persons concerned to perform the service required by such enactment, and to give it full effect, I do hereby order and proclaim that no plea of alienage will be received, or allowed, to exempt from the obligations imposed by the aforesaid act of Congress any person of foreign birth who shall have declared on oath his intention to become a citizen of the United States, under the laws thereof, and who shall be found within the United States at any time during the continuance of the present insurrection and rebellion, at or after the expi. ration of the period of sixty-five days from the date of this proclamation; nor shail any such plea of alienage be allowed in favor of any such person who has so, as aforesaid, declared his intention to become a citizen of the United States, and shall have exercised at any time the right of suffrage, or any other political franchise within the United States, under the laws thereof, or under the laws of any of the several States.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this 8th day of [l. s.] May, in the year of our Lord 1863, and of the inde

pendence of the United States the eighty-seventh. By the President:

ABRAHAM LINCOLN. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

PRESIDENT'S LETTER TO GEN. SCHOFIELD RELATIVE TO THE

REMOVAL OF GEN. CURTIS.

EXECUTIVE MANSION,

WASHINGTON, May 27, 1863. Gen. J. M. SCHOFIELDDear Sir: Having removed Gen. Curtis and assigned you to the command of the Department of the Missouri, I think it may be of some advantage to me to ostate to you why I did it I did not remove Gen. Curtis because of my full conviction that he had done wrong by commission or omission. I did it because of a conviction in my mind that the Union men of Missouri, constituting, when united, a vast majority of the people, have entered into a pestilent, factious quarrel among themselves, Gen. Curtis, perhaps not of choice, being the head of one faction, and Gov. Gamble that of the other. After months of labor to reconcile the difficulty, it seemed to grow worse and worse, until I felt it my duty to break it up somehow, and as I could not remove Gov. Gamble, I had to remove Gen. Curtis. Now that you are in the position, I wish you to undo nothing merely because Gen. Curtis or Gov. Gamble did it, but to exercise your own judgment, and do right for the public interest. Let your military measures be strong enough to repel the invaders and keep the peace, and not 80 strong as to unnecessarily harass and persecute the people. It is a difficult role, and so much greater will be the honor if you perform it well. If both factions, or neither, shall abuse you, you will probably be about right. Beware of being assailed by one and praised by the other.

Yours, truly, A. LINCOLN.

Preceded by a band of music, many of the citizens of Washington, filled with joy at the defeat of the Rebels at Gettysburg, visited the White House on the evening of the 4th of July, 1863, and serenaded the President, who acknowledged the compliment in the following terms:

FELLOW-CITIZENS: I am very glad indeed to see you tonight, and yet I will not say I thank you for this call; but I do most sincerely thank Almighty God for the occasion on which you have called. How long ago is it-eighty odd years— sinče, on the 4th of July, for the first time in the history of the world, a nation, by its representatives, assembled and declared as a self-evident truth, “ that all men are created equal."' That was the birthday of the United States of America. Since then the 4th of July has had several very peculiar recognitions. The two men most distinguished in the framing and

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