Page images
PDF
EPUB

و

1. See opposite

our

2. Everett, Edward. Yurers of

republic

Questions of the day

1860.

3.

.

1861.

[merged small][graphic][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed][subsumed]

AN ELEGANT SERIAL IN PAMPHLET FORM,

CONTAINS

PHONOGRAPHIC REPORTS

OF THE BEST

SERMONS, POPULAR LECTURES,

ORATIONS, ETC.
ANDREW J. GRAHAM and CHARLES B. COLLAR,

Reporters and Editors.
TWELVE NUMBERS, $1 00 IN ADVANCE ; SINGLE NUMBER, 10 CENTS.

The special object in the publication of this Serial, is to preserve in convenient form the best thoughts of our most gifted men, just as they come from their lips ; thus retaining their freshness and personality. Great favor has already been shown the work, and its long continuance is certain. The successive numbers will be issued as often as Discourses worthy a place in the Serial can be found ; out of the many reported, we hope to elect twelve each year.

EIGHT NUMBERS ARE READY. No. 8.-EDWARD EVERETT'S ORATION at the Inauguration of the Statue of Daniel Webster, at Boston, Sept. 17, 1859. This is justly regarded as one of Mr. Everett's greatest efforts.

No. 7.-COMING TO CHRIST. The last sermon in the celebrated Academy of Music Course. By Rev. HENRY MARTIN SCUDDER, M.D., D.D., Missionary to India.

No. 6.—THE TRIBUTE TO HUMBOLDT ; being the interesting and scholarly Addresses on the career of the great Cosmopolitan, by Hon. Geo. BANCROFT, Rev. Dr. THOMPSON, Profs. AGASSIZ, LJEBER, BACHE, and Guyot.

No. 5.- The Great Sermon of Rev. A. KINGMAN Nott (recently deceased), on JESUS AND THE RESURRECTION, delivered in the Academy of Music, New York, February 13, 1859.

No. 4.—THE PROGRESS AND DEMANDS OF CHRISTIANITY. By the Rev. Wm. H. MILBURN (the blind preacher). With an interesting Biographical Sketch.

No. 3.-The eloquent Discourse of Prof. O. M. MITCHELL, of the Cincinnati Observatory, on the GREAT UNFINISHED PROBLEMS OF THE UNIVERSE.

No. 2.-The celebrated Addresses of the Rev. IIENRY WARD BEECHER and JAMES T. Brady, Esq., on MENTAL CULTURE FOR WOMEN.

No. 1.--The Rev. T. L. CUYLER'S Sermon on CHRISTIAN RECREATION AND UNCHRISTIAN AMUSEMENT.

Numbers are promptly mailed from the office, on receipt of the price.

H. H. LLOYD & Co., Publishers,
12 Appleton's Building, 348 Broadway, New York.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Oration delivered by the Hon. Edward Everett, on the occasion of the dedication

of the Statue of Mr. Webster, in Boston, Sept. 17th, 1859.”

[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY:

On behalf of those by whose contributions this statue of Mr. Webster has been procured, and of the committee intrusted with the care of its erection, it is my pleasing duty to return to you, and through you to the Legislature of the Commonwealth, our dutiful acknowledgments for the permission kindly accorded to us, to place the Statue in the Public Grounds. We feel, sir, that in allowing this monumental work to be erected in front of the Capitol of the State, a distinguished honor has been paid to the memory of Mr. Webster.

To you, sir, in particular, whose influence was liberally employed to promote this result, and whose personal attendance and participation have added so much to the interest of the day, we are under the highest obligations.

To you, our distinguished guests, and to you, fellow-citizens, of either sex, who come to unite with us in rendering these monumental honors, who adorn the occasion with your presence, and cheer us with your countenance and favor, we tender a respectful and grateful welcome.

To you, also, Mr. Mayor, and to the City Council, we return our cordial thanks for your kind consent to act on our behalf, in delive ering this cherished memorial of our honored fellow-citizen into the custody of the Commonwealth, and for your sympathy and assistance in the duties of the occasion.

It has been the custom, from the remotest antiquity, to preserve and to hand down to posterity, in bronze and in marble, the counterfeit presentment of illustrious men. Within the last few years modern research has brought to light, on the banks of the Tigris, huge slabs of alabaster, buried for ages, which exhibit in relief the faces and the persons of men who governed the primeval East in the gray dawn of History. Three thousand years have elapsed since they lived and reigned, and built palaces, and fortified cities, and waged war, and gained victories, of which the trophies are carved upon these monuinental tablets—the triumphal procession, the chariots laden with spoil, the drooping captive, the conquered monarch in chains,—but the legends inscribed upon the stone are imperfectly deciphered, and little beyond the names of the personages, and the most general tradition of their exploits is preserved.

« PreviousContinue »