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LINCOLN,

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225;

ABRAHAM.-Continued.
troversy over fee, 118; meels Stan.
ton in McCormick case, 119-121;
case before magistrate, 121; Rock

Island Bridge case, 122.
Anti-Nebraska Campaign. Divides

time with Douglas at Springfield,
130, at Peoria, 131-138; favors grad.
ual emancipation, 134; slavery un-
just, 136; beaten for Senatorsbip,
138; takes no part in Know-Nothing
movement, 139; letter to Speed,
140-142; at first Republican State
Convention, 144; receives 110 votes
for Vice Presidential nomination at
Puiladelplia Convention, 144; de-
clines proposed nomination for Gov-
eruor, 145; speaks at Springfield,
148-152; on Dred Scott decision, 149,
defends Armstrong, 153; defends

young Linder, 155.
Lincoln-Douglas Debate.--Selected as

Republican candidate for Senator-
ship, 158; speech before conven-
tion, 158-161; "a house divided
against itself cannot stand," 159;
hears Douglas at Chicago, 162-164;
replies, 164-166; speaks at Spring-
field, 166-168; challenges Douglas to
debate, 168; debate begins at Ot-
tawa, 170; speech of Douglas, 170
173; Lincoln's answer, 173-176; reply
of Douglas, 176; opens at Freeport,
177, 178; questions Douglas, 178;
answered by Douglas, 179-181: Frce-
port doctrine, 179; reply, 182; at
Jonesboro, 183-187; at Charleston,
188; at Galesburg, 189, 190; at
Quincy, 191, 192; at Alton, 193-195;

letter to Judd, 196.
Aller the Battle.-Law cases, 196; on

lecture platform, 197; speaks at Chi-
cego, 197; suggested for Presidency,
198; Jefferson birthday letter, 198,
199; German-American letter, 200,
201; to Colfax, 201, 202; to Gallo-
way, 202-204; in Ohio, 204; speaks at
Cincinnati, 205, 206; at Milwaukee,
207; letter to Dungy, 208; furnishes
speeches for publication, 209;
speaks in Kansas, 211, 212;

Candidate for Presidency.- Presented

by Judd, 218; receives nomination on
third ballot, 219; vote analyzed, 219-
234; hears news, 244; notified by
committee,

accepts, 225;
watches campaign from Springfield,
229; visited by Weed, 232; elected
to Presidency, 324; considers Cabi-
net, 239-242; meets Hamlin, 242; let.
ter to Washburne, 242; criticised by
Pugh, 247; letters to Stephens, 245,
249; starts for Washington, 200;
farewell speech, 260; speaks at In-
dianapolis, 261, 262; at Cincinnati,
263; at Cleveland, 264; at Buffalo,
265; at Albany, 263; at New York,
266, 267; at Trenton, 267, 268; at
Philadelphia, 269, 270; at Harris-
burg, 270, 271; receives threatening
letters, 271; warned by Seward and
Scott, 272; arrives at Washington,
273; calls at White House, 274; re-

vises inaugural, 275.
President.-Inaugurated, 277-282; 10-

augural address, 279-282; sworn la
by Taney, 282; nominates Cabinet,
282; and foreign representatives,
283; declines to receive Confederate
Commissioners, 287; consults Fox,
288; consults Cabinet as to Sumter,
289; orders Sumter relieved, 289; re-

jects Seward's "policy," 292,
The War of Secession.-Attack upon

Sumter, 293, 294; calls for troops,
205; calls extra session, 296; Inter-
view with Douglas, 296, 297; with
Virgiria committee, 298; letter to
Fox, 299; to Baltimore committee,
302; to Governor Hicks, 303; inter-
view with Mayor Brown, 303; let.
ter from Law, 305; proclaims block-
ade, 309; second call for troops, 312;
receives Maryland legislative com-
puittee, 313; affected by Ellsworth's
death. 316; message to Congress,
321-325; supported by Congress, 325-
328; calls for more troops, 328; “Re-

LINOOLN, ABRAHAM.-Continued.

publican Court," 339; transfers Me-
Dowell, 340; summons McClellan,
341; letter from Fremont, 349; modi-
fies Fremont's order as to emanci-
pation, 332, 333; relieves Fremont
from command, 353; asks McClel-
lan's views, 303; McClellan “memo-
randum," 363-366; endeavors to rec-
oncile Scott and McClellan, 367;
visits Pennsylvania camp, 369; grief
at Baker's death uncontrollable, 372;
Scott's tribute to President, 373; ac-
cepts Scott's request for retirement,
373: appoints McClellan as General-
in-chief, 374; message to Congress,
374; elides Cameron's suggestion as
to arming slaves, 375; directs sur-
render of Mason and Slidell, 377.

Vol. II.
Second Stage of the War Initiated.-

Letter to Halleck, 2; to Buell, 3, 4, 5;
appoints Stanton, 7; reference to
Cameron, 8; General War Order No.
1; loses son Willie, 17, 31; submits
memorandum to McClellan, 32; or-
ders adrance, 33; letter to McClel-
lan, 34; order of March 8, 36; re-
lieves McClellan as Commander-in-
chief, 38; directs Immediate ad-
vance, 40; urges McClellan to strike
a blow, 41-43; visits army of Old
Point Comfort, 46; letter to McClel-
lan, 48, 49; confers with McDow-
eli, 51; telegrams to McClellan, 51-53,
56, 59; “responsibility” dispatch and
replies, 60, 61; calis for more troops,
67; plans spoiled by Fremont, 68;
letters to Fremont, 69, 70; appoints
Halleck Generai-in-chief, and Pope
to command Army of Virginia, 71;
correspondence with McClellan, 72-
71; visits camp at Harrison's Land-
ing, 74; political letter from MC-
Clellan, 74-76; submits questions to

Cenerals, 76-79.
The Fundamental Cause.--Abolishment

of slavery, 80; consults border Con-
gressmen, 81; slavery resolution
adopted, 81; disapproves Hunter's

LINCOLN,

ABRAHAM.-Continued.
order, 81, 82; approves District
emancipation bill, 82; approves act
to suppress treason, etc., 83; also
Arnold act, 84; final appeal to Bor-
der State representatives, 84; to col-
ored delegation, 85; Durant letter,
86-88; letter to Gasparin, 89; Gree-
ley's “Prayer of Twenty Millions,"

21; answers Greeley, 92, 93.
The Army Under McClellan, Pope and

Burnside.-Advises McClellan as to
Pope, 103; conference with Hallock
and McClellan, 103; asks McClel-
lan's intluence with army, 104; puts
capital under

McClellan's protec-
tlon, 105; congratulates McClellan
after South Mountain, 107; emanci.
pation under consideration, 111-117;
preliminary emancipation proclama-
tion, 117-119; not satisfied with MC-
Clellan, 130; visits him in camp,
130; orders him to give battle,
131; warns McClellan against over-
cautiousness, 131-134; dismisses Key,
134, 135; urges McClellan to action,
136-137; relieves McClellan and ap-
points Burnside, 138. Sunday proc-
lamation, 139; religion, 140; letter to
Reed, 140; message to Congress, 141-

145.
Third Stage of the War; Emancipa-

tion. – Distress at Fredericksburg
loss, 157; address to army, 157; Sen.
atorial committee asks removal of
Seward, 160; refuses, 161; Seward
and Chase's resignations declined,
162; Emancipation Proclamation,
162 164; reply to Manchester work-
Ingmen, 165; letter to Burnside, 106;
displaces Burnside for Hooker, 168;
West Virginia, Arizona and Mon-
tana, 168; Conscription Act, 168; ap.
points slavery compensation com-
missioners, 168; letter about Ger-
mans, 170; interview with St. Louis
Germans, 171-173; letter to Schofield,
173; to Drake, 173, 174; Vallan-
digham case, 175-177; messages
to Hooker, 178, 179; Chancel-
lorsville, 180-184; messages to Hook.

vol. ii.-26

LINOOLN, ABRAHAM.-Continued.

nual message, 313-315; appoints
Chase Chief Justice, 315; appoints
Speed Attorney-General, and Mc-
Culloch Secretary of Treasury, 316;
approves the anti-slavery ameud.
ment, 316, 317; Sherman's Christmas
gift, 323; peace negotiations, 325-
333; passes Blair through the lines,
326; Hampton Roads conference,
330; Charles I. anecdote, 332; "root,
hog or die,” 333; receives notice of
electoral count, 334; Lee's peace
proposal, 333; instructions to Grant,
336; second inaugural, 336-338;
speech to Indiana soldiers, 339; in-
terriew with Speed, 340; releases
prisoners, 340, 341; visits Grant at

City Point, 342.
End of War and Death.-In Rich-

mond, 346; James Speed's recollec-
tions, 347, Mendenhall's recol-
lections, 348, 349; returns to Wash-
ington, 349; addresses public for
last time, 349-352; Campbell Inter-
view, 352, 353; last Cabinet council,
355, 356; shot at Ford's Theatre,
April 14, 1865, 357-339; death, 360;

obsequies, 360, 361.
Memorabilia. - Education, 362; early

political disappointments, 363; per-
sonal appearance, 365, 366; relations
with Collamer, Seward, Chase, Sum-
ner, Wade and others of his party,
366-371; writer's meetings with Lin.
coln, 374-378; memoranda of meet-
ings, 373-375; illustrative anecdotes,
576-378; anecdotes by General
Palmer, 379, 380; literary side, 380-
383; “words of wisdom,” 381, 382;
impromptu speeches, 384; love of
Shakespeare, 385; accuracy
names and words; in Jefferson
Davis's chair, 387; Lincoln monu-

as

to

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM.-Continued.

ei, 184, 185; Vicksburg and message
to Grant, 189, 190; messages to
Hooker, 191, 192; calls militia into
service, 194; puts Meade in place of
Ilooker-Gettysburg, 194-8; personal
anecdotes, 199; letters to Hackett,
200, 201; letter to Conkling, 202-
206;

Thauksgiving proclamation,
206; Gettysburg speech, 207-210;
letter from Everett, 209; thanks
Grant, 215; annual message, 219;
final Proclamation of Emanci.
pation, 220; Amnesty Proclama-
tion, 221; Reconstruction,

223-227;
letters to Hahn and Shepley, 224,
225; telegram to Maynard, 227; ap-
points Grant Lieutenant General,
229; meets Grant, 230; renomination
favored, 230; correspondence with
Chase with reference to Pomeroy
circular, 232-234; “Union” opposition,
235; black troops, 235-241; letter to
Hodges, 239: speaks at Baltimore
fair, 242; Fort Pillow, 243-245;

letter to Grant, and answer, 248-249.
Second Campaign and Re-election to

Presidency. Renominated, 260-263;
comment on Johnson's nomination,
264; accepts nomination, 265, 266;
uses influence for Thirteenth
Amendment, 270; speaks at Phlla-
delphia fair, 274; appoints Smith to
judgeship and Usher to Interior De-
partment, 274; accepts Chase's
resignation, 274, 275; Tod declines
Secretaryship, and Fessenden ap-
pointed, 276; offers to receive nego-
tiations for peace, 276-279; over-
rules Stanton, 282; ignores Vallan-
digham, 282; calls for more volun-
teers, 291; scheme to substitute
another nominee, 291-296; proclama-
tion as to Davis reconstruction bill,
292; attacked in Democratic Con-
vention, 296-298; asks Blair's resig-
dation, 305; appoints Dennison as
successor,

305; October elections,
303; visited by Tennessee delega-
tion, 307; answer, 308; Confederate
cipher dispatch, 308; re-elected, 310;
congratulations, 311, 312; last

ment at Springfield, 388.
Lincoln, Abraham, of Worcester, I., 3.
Lincoln, Abraham, son of Mordecai,

I., 3.
Lincoln, Abraham, son of Mordecal,

Jr., I., 4.
Lincoln, Abraham, son of John, and

grandfather of the President, I., 5.

an :

Lincoln, General Benjamin, I., 2.
Lincoln, Daniel, I., 2.
Lincoln, Edward, born March 10, 1846;

died February 1, 1850; I., 114.
Lincoln, Enoch, Governor, I., 3.
Lincoln, Hannah, wife of Mordecal,

Jr., daughter of Judge Richard

Salter, I., 14.
Lincoln, Isaac, son of Mordecai, I., 3.
Lincoln, Isaac, son of John, I., 5, 7.
Lincoln, Jacob, son of Mordecai, I., 3.
Lincoln, Jacob, son of John, I., 5.
Lincoln, John, son of Mordecai, Jr.,

I., 1, 4, 5.
Lincoln, John, son of John, I., 5.
Lincoln, Josiah, son of Abrabam and

uncle of President, I., 6.
Lincoln, Levi, Harvard graduate and

Attorney General, I., 13.
Lincoln, Levi, Jr., Governor, I., 3.
Lincoln, Mary Todd, see Mary Todd;

1., 115, 115, 215; 261, 273, 316; II.,

341, 346, 357.
Lincoln, Mordecai, son of Samuel the

settler, I., 1, 3.
Liucoln, Mordecal, Jr., I., 3, 4.
Lincoln, Mordecai, son of Abraham

and uncle of President, I., 5, 6.
Lincoln, Mordecai, I., 7.
Lincoln, Nancy Hanks, I., 8, 9, 10,

15, 16.
Lincoln, Robert Todd, born August 1,

1843, I., 114; 214; II., 355, 374.
Lincoln, Sally Bush, I., 16, 17, 18.
Lincoln, Samuel, the settler, I., 1, 2, 3.
Lincoln, Samuel, Jr., son of Samuel

the settler, I., 3.
Lincoln, Sarah, wife of Mordecal,

daughter of Abraham Jones, I., 3.
Lincoln, Sarah, sister of President, I.,

9, 10, 16, 19, 20.
Lincoln Station, I., 12, 13.
Lincoln, Thomas, the cooper, I., 2.
L!ncoln, Thomas, the weaver, I., 2.
Lincoln, Thomas, son of John Lincoln,

I., 5.
Lincoln, Thomas, of Abraham,

grandson of John, and father of
President, I., 6, 7; marrles Nancy
Hanks, 8, 9, 10; leaves Kentucky, 11,
12; loses wife, 15; marries Mrs.
Johnston, 17; moves to Illinois, 25;

settles in Coles County, 28; dies

1851; 115.
Lincoln, Thomas, “Tad," born April

4, 1853, I., 114.
Lincoln, William, born December 21,

1830, I., 114; II., 17, 31.
Linder, U. F., I., 10; son defended by

Lincoln, 155.
Lineage, see Lincoln.
Link horn, I., 1.
“ Linkborne sheire," I., 2.
Linklon, I., 1.
Little Pigeon Creek, I., 3, 25.
Logan, John A., II., 289.
Lugan, Stephen T., I., 50; Lincoln's

law partner, 67; terminates partner.

ship, 78; beaten for Congress, 102.
"Long Nine," I., 44,46, 48.
Longstreet, James, II., 54, 62, 63, 101,

154, 182, 193, 196, 213, 213, 309, 336.
Loring W. W., II., 20, 21.
"Lost Township" letter, I., 75.
Louisiana Purchase, I., 124.
Louisiana, The, II., 29.
Lovejoy, Elijah P., I., 195.
Lovejoy, Owen, resolution as to fugl.

tive slares, I., 347.
Lorell, Mansfield, II., 30.
Lucas, J. M., I., 106.
Lyon, Nathaniel, saves Missouri, I.,

814; occupies Jefferson City and de-
feats Price at Booneville, 319, 348;

killed at Wilson's Creek, 350.
McCall, George A., I., 370; II., 57, 62,

65, 99.
McCauley, Charles S., I., 307; II., 36.
McClellan, George B., I., 118, 311;

Major-General, 313, 316; proclama.
tion, 317; Laurel Hill, Rich Moun.
tain and Carrick's Ford, 318; in
command of Army of Potomac, 341,
358, 362; submits plan to President,
363-366; reviews situation to Scott,
366; Scott's reply, 366-368; overrates
enemy, 369; criticised for Ball's Bluff,
372; visits camp, 372; succeeds Scott,
373, 374; II., 1, 2, 5, 10, 31, 32, 34;
occupies Centreville and Manassas,
36; relieved as Commander-in-chief,
38; plan of campaign, 38; lands at
old Point Comfort, 40; besleges
Yorktown, 40; urged to action by

son

Lincolu, 41; Williamsburg, 43, 45;
reorganizes corps, 47-49; letters from
Lincoln and Stanton, 19; strength of
army, 49; telegrams from Lincoln,
61-53; on defensive, 55; Fair Oaks,
63-56; still delays for reinforcements,
57; correspondence with Lincoln, 58,
59; promises and delays, 59, 60; "re-
sponsibility” dispatch, 60; Stanton's
reply, 60; Lincoln's reply, 61;
strength of army in June, 61; at-
tacked, 62; Beaver Dam Creek, 62.
Gaines's MIII, 63; Savage's Station,
64. “You have done your best to
sacrifice this army"dispatch to Stan-
ton, 64; White Oak Swamp, Glen.
dale, 64; Malvern HII, 65-66; retreats
to Harrison's Landing, 66; explains
change of base, 66-67; 70, 71; cor-
respondence with Lincoln, 73-74; po-
litical letter, 74-76; answers Lin-
coln's interrogations, 76-78; on
Pope's orders, 95; ordered to with-
draw from Peninsula, 95, 96, 98, 99;
telegrams to Halleck, 102, 103; Lin-
coln's advice, 103; conference with
Lincoln and Halleck, 103; promises
to influence army, 104; placed in
control of protection of capital, 105;
takes field, 103; South Mountain, 106;
telegraphs victory to Lincoln, 107;
Antletam, 107-110; compared to
Fabius and others, 128; supported
by Democrats, 129; visited by Lin.
colu, 130; ordered to glve battle, 131;
warned by Lincoln against over.
cautiousness, 131-134; correspond-
eace as to advance, 136, 137; re-
lieved from command, 138; 158, 159;
nominated for Presidency, 296; let.
ter of acceptance, 298; defeated,

310.
McClure, A. K., II., 263.
M¢Clernand, John A., I., 44; II., 11,

14, 24, 25, 152, 153, 186-189.
McCook, A. McD., II., 26, 27, 123, 124,

146, 147, 211, 212.
McCown, J. P., II., 22.
McCormick, Cyrus H., I., 119.
M¢Culloch, Ben., I., 348-351; II., 18, 19.
McCulloch, Hugh, II., 273, 316.

McDowell, Irvin, I., 318; at Bull Run,

332-338, 340; II., 35, 39-42, 49, 51:

53, 61, 69, 70, 71, 95, 98, 101, 172.
McDowell, James, I., 86.
MeIntosh, James M., II., 19.
McLane, R. M., I., 86.
McLaws, Lafayette, II., 105, 107, 182.
McLean County tax case, 117.
McLean, John, I., 105; 110; hears

McCormick case, 120; defeated by
Fremont for Republican Domina-
tion, 144; before Chicago Conven.

tion, 218, 222; II., 364.
McPheeters, Samuel B., II., 174.
McPherson, J. B., II., 187-189, 254,

255, 288, 289.
Macon County, I., 26.
Maftit, J. N., II., 257.
Magoffin, Beriah, response to Lin-

coln's proclamation, I., 296; 356.
Magrath, Judge, resigas, I., 238,
Magruder, John B., I., 275, 277, 278,

311, 321, 330; II., 40, 42, 54, 61, 64,

159.
Maine and South Carolina vote com-

pared, I., 135.
Nalet, Sir Edward, II., 365.
Malvern Hill, II., 65, 66.
Manassas Junction, I., 319, 332-338;

11., 100, 101.
Manassas, The, II., 129.
Manny, John H., I., 119.
Mansfield, Joseph K. F., 1., 311;

crosses Potomac, 315, 319; II., 107,

108, 109.
Marsh, George P., I., 85.
Marshall, Joseph G., decllnes Gov.

ernorship of Oregon, I., 109.
Marshall, Humphrey, quoted, I., 14.
Maryland, against disunion, I., 258,

296; remains loyal, 298, 300; pro-
tests against Federal troops, 312;
Union feeling in, 312; legislative
committee from, 313; pacified, 313;

abolishes slavery, II., 305.
Mason, James M., I., 317, 360,377.
Massachusetts Sixth, I., 299; attacked

by. Baltimore mob, 300, 301; Eighth,

passes through Maryland, 306.
Matteson slave case, I., 58,
Matteson, John A., I., 138.

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