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Quinn's Hamlet, 174; The Suspicious
Husband, 174, 321; The Foundling,
175, 321; Dryden's plots, 175, 322; an
Easter homily, 175, 323; on prose and
poetry, 176, 325; Spirit in writing,
176, 325; the Reformer ceases, 177,
328; Longinus, 178; Epithalamium on
Richard Shackleton's marriage, 178

“confined ridicule," 239; accused of
being

“ damned absolute,” 239; on
luxury, 242; thanked for his presidency,
243; the Stadtholdership, 243; leniency
to the Scotch rebels, 244; sea pirates,
245; receives the grand thanks, 246;
Huske at Falkirk, 247; painting,
poetry and philosophy, 248; as Brutus
the First, 250; an absentee tax, 252;
the Sermon on the Mount, 252; ac-
cusation of Dennis, 253; the ecliptic,
261; Chesterfield's viceroyalty, 263,
264; excused during examinations,
265; Molock's speech, 266; multi-
plicity of laws, 267; on the passions,
268; literary piracy, 272; moves that
Shackleton be permitted to wear his
hat, 274; on malice, 275, 276; as
Coriolanus, 276; punishes Buck, 277;
appointed censor, 279; accuses Arde-
soif, 279; law as to presidents' powers,
280; fined, 280; speech as censor, 280;
receives minor thanks, 281; president,
281; on piety, 281; censures Ardesoif
and Hamilton, 285; on hours of meet-
ing, 285; as a senator against Caesar,
287; sheep stealing; the death penalty,
289; as Othello, 289; “not perfect,
291; on oratory, 291; on alcohol
drinking, 291, 292; censures Dennis,
293; speech from Milton
fect," 293; as Ulysses, 293

The Reformer, articles by Burke,
see Appendix II, 297-329

Lucas Controversy, pamphlets and
articles submitted written by
Burke, see “Lucas Controversy,
Appendix III, 331–395

manner

The Lucas Controversy, 180–202;
Charles Lucas, Henry Brooke, 180;
legend that Burke satirised them, 180-
182; no evidence for it, 180; Burke's
attacks on The Cork Surgeon, 183; Sir
R. Cox, the Cork surgeon mistaken
for Lucas, the Dublin apothecary,
182; A Free Briton's Advice, four
pamphlets, signed Helvidius Priscus,
331, 337, 342, 349; written by Burke,
190, 191; Lucas, Epaminondas; The
Naked' Truth, pamphlet, 191, 356;
description of Lucas and 'La Touche,
192, 357, 360; two Letters to the
Citizens of Dublin, 195, 363, 372; the
“Court Patriot,” 195, 364;, exposure
of The Cork Surgeon's Antidote, 196,
364; parodies him, 200; a “Patriot
Parliament,” 200, 380-384; Burke's
authorship of pamphlets against Cox,
201, 336, 389

Foundation of “the Club,” 203;
Burke's energy, 214;

of
speaking, 214; Irish accent, 215;
Dennis refers to his marriage, 211;
pamphlet-writing for the
Ones," assisting Lord Egmont and
Lord Granville, 211; Dennis criticises
the Sublime and Beautiful, 212; com-
parison with Hutcheson, 212; Burke
visits Dennis, 213; “A Colossus,
213; sends him the Sublime and
Beautiful, 213; Burke's early character-
istics in debate, 214-218; "damned
absolute,” 216, 239; impeachments in
the Club, 216; the Via Media, 216; on
absenteeism, 218, 252; leaves T.C.D.,
219; letter to Matthew Smith, 219;
description of London; Westminster
Abbey, 220; references to Peg Wof-
fington and Henry Brooke, 221, 222;
Matthew Smith's reply, 222; enigma
on the daughters of Cadmus, 222; Peg
Woffington, 223; Henry Brooke, 224

Burke in the Club, accused of scur-
rility, 226; approves Buck's draft
laws, 227; essay on society, 230; on
Alcibiades, 230; on the Genoese, 230;
thanked for matter of oration but not
for its delivery, 231; on the Dutch;
the Barrier Treaty; the English in the
war, 232; wool trade; “ticklish sub-
jects"; freedom of debate, 236, 237;
the Passions, 236, 268; harangue on
Presidency, 238; on pride, 238; a

London Evening Post, articles and
correspondence with R. Shackleton,

see Appendix IV, 396–404
Burke, Edmund, an infant, buried in St

James' churchyard, 3, 4
Burke, Ellen, infant sister of Edmund,

born, 4, 55
Burke, Garret, brother of Edmund, 2, 3,

6, 8, 10, 42, 85, 95, 96, 143, 150;
father's executor and residuary legatee,

406
Burke, Juliana, sister of Edmund,

baptismal certificate, 3; marries Patrick
French, 6; marriage licence, 7; her
firtation with R. Shackleton, 41, 45;
Julia and Belinda, 45, 151, 153, 164;
Dulcinea's commands, 48; father's

legacies to, 406
Burke, Mary (Mary Nagle), mother of

Edmund, 1, 5, 402; marriage licence
bond, 2; illness, 55, 97, 98, 101;
Burke's affection for her, 97; hus-

band's legacies to, 405
Burke, Mary, two infant sisters of

Edmund, so baptised, 4

« Great

as

Burke, Richard, father of Edmund,

marries Mary Nagle, 2-5; marriage
licence bond, 2; will, 3, 50, 405;
children of, 3, 4; birth and burial
certificates of infants, 3, 4; attorney
of Exchequer, 5; penal laws, 5, 6;
high professional standing, 5; splenetic,
5, 95; his friend Harding, 50, 405;
opposes Burke's residing in college,
95; Dennis' description of, 96; op-
poses Edmund going to America, 97;
changes residence from Arran Quay

to 3 Lower Ormond Quay, 106
Burke, Richard (Dick), brother of

Edmund, 2, 6; baptism, 4; at dame's
school, 8; at Ballitore, 10, 17, 29, 31,
33; Edmund anxious about his be-
haviour, 43; and cleanliness, 50;
mentioned, 58, 88; taken from Bal-
litore, 92; returns, 92, 102; Edmund

advises his reading, 106
Burney, Miss, on Burke's oratory, 215
Butchery, stage, 169, 305
Cadmus, the daughters of, 221; enigma,

222
Cambridge Union Society, 205
Cambridge University, early connection

with T.C.D., 28, 29
Capulets, the Tomb of," 221
Carey, H., 49
Cartesian philosophy, 67.
Castletown-Roche, parish register, 3
Cebes, 27, 28, 100
Censor, Lucas' paper, 189; attacks on Sir

R. Cox and Chief Justice Marlay, 189,

389; Burke's contributions to,390–395
Centlivre, Susanna, her plays, 166, 300
Chappel, Wm., D.D., Provost, a Ramist,

28; Milton's tutor, 29
Charlemont, Lord, 202, 216
Chesterfield, Earl, Lord-Lieutenant, 25,
73, 88-90; Bur!

on, 263
Chrononhotonthologos, King, 49
Cibber, 50, 300, 322
Cicero, 24, 100, 104, 129, 190, 331, 337,

342, 349, 390, 393
Club, the “Correspondence,” 25, 26, 73,

78
Club, the, founded in T.C.D., 26, 134,

203 ; germ of College Historical Society,
134, 137, 203; originated by Burke,
64, 65, 203; letter of Burke and
Dennis describing proceedings, 139;
the Minute Book, 203-207; see Ap-
pendix I, 225-295; rules drawn by
Buck approved by Burke, 227; Pro-
ceedings, Debates, etc., Coriolanus,
Alcibiades, 230; the Genoese, 230;
Lord Lovat, 232; the Dutch in the
War, 232; Milton, 233 ; linen and wool
trade restrictions, 234;

ticklish
points,” 235, 237; the passions, 236,

268; poetry, 238; pride, 238; ridicule,
239; Hamilton's and Mohun's trials,
239; Buck's trial, 240; Roman luxury;
Dennis as Cato; Buck as Scipio;
Shackleton as a Roman; Burke's sum-
mary, 240–242; Shackleton on the
Decalogue, 242; Burke thanked for
his presidency, 243; on the Stadt-
holder, 243; on the Scotch rebels,
244, 245; piracy at sea, 245; battle of
Falkirk, 247; painting, 248; philo-
sophy and poetry, 249; Admiral
Anson, 249; poverty, 251; on the
scholars and the riot, 251; an ab-
sentee tax, 252; Burke on Sermon
on the Mount, 252; Burke impeaches
Dennis, 253, 254; absence of the
president, 255; on history, 257; the
ecliptic, 257-263; Chesterfield as
Lord-Lieutenant, 263; Molock's
speech, 266; multiplicity of laws, 267;
literary piracy, 269–274; Shackleton
and his hat, 274; Burke on “Malice,'
275, 276; Burke as Coriolanus, 276;
Satan's speech, 277; commonplace by
Buck on Numbers xxiii. 10, 277;
election of censor, 278; Ardesoif im-
peached, 279; Burke's law as to presi-
dent's power, 280; Burke fined, 280;
Burke's speech as censor, 281; Burke
president, 281; on piety, 281; the laws,
282; Hamilton accused, 283; good
nature, 284; deaths of Scipio, Han-
nibal and Philipoemon, 284; atheism,
285; Buck's faulty minutes, 285;
Hamilton and Ardesoif censured, 285;
stationery allowances, 286; hours of
meeting, 286; Caesar's command in
Gaul, 287; charity, 289; earthquake
at Lima, 289; sheep stealing and
death penalty, 289; Prussias and
Hannibal, 290; Shackleton's Latin
verses, 291; alcohol, 291-293; Dennis
censured, 293; embassy of Ulysses,

294; Regulus and Carthage, 295
Cock's Hill, 26, 64, 72
College Historical Society, T.C.D.,

origin, 26, 64, 134, 137, 203, 205
Comedy, “Weeping," 175, 322
Complaints of Dublin, the, 187
Conditions of Life, On the Several, poem,

170, 308
Congreve, Wm, dramas, 157, 166, 168,

301
Cooke, John, M.A., article on "The

Club,” 225
Cooper's Hill, 150
Cork assizes, 78
Cork Surgeon, the, see Cox, Sir Richard
Corruption, directors of, 198, 373;

methods of, 336, 352-355
Cotter, Joseph, publisher, 140, 160
Cotter, Sarah, 140, 150

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Court Patriot, the (Sir R. Cox), 195, 199, Don Bellianis of Greece, Burke's refer-
364, 365, 375

ences to, 45; Kirkman's edition, 46;
Cowley, 56

description of Ireland in, 46, 47
Cox, Cornelius, merchant, 26, 64, 72 Dorset, Letter to the Duke of, 199, 201,
Cox, Sir Richard, M.P. (the Cork 202, 375–378, 387, 388

Surgeon), Lucas' opponent, 182; The Dryden's dramas, 167, 174, 302, 320
Cork Surgeon's Antidote; “Anthony Dunciad, the, 29, 50, 104
Litten,” 182, 196, 202, 364, 388; Dunkin, Rev. Wm., D.D., his Boeotia,
attacked by Burke, 183, 196, 364, 385; 129, 130; Swift's friendship; head
carries resolution that Lucas was a master of Portora, 131
public enemy, 194; the Court Patriot,
195, 364, 375; exposed in Letters to Egmont, Lord, Burke assists, 211
the Citizens of Dublin, 195, 363, 372; Epaminondas, Lucas referred to as, 180,
his writings parodied, 200, 378; his 191, 332, 393
Letter to the Duke of Dorset, 199, 2017

Epictetus, 28, 30
376, 385-388; his dream,” 366, 386 Epithalamium, Burke's, on Shackleton's
Crawfurd, Wm., article in National marriage, 178

Magazine on Burke's and Dennis' Essay on Waters, by Lucas, Johnson's
letters, 137-139

recommendation, 202
Croly, Rev. George, LL.D., Life of Euripides, 304

Burke, misrepresents Burke's college Eusebius,” letter in London Evening
career, 99; reiterates the Burke and

Post, 397, 402
Lucas legend, 180, 193
Crump, Rev. George, LL.D., his Utopia Falkirk, battle of, 89, 247
or Apollo's Golden Days, 155

Fame, 248, 356, 391–393
Culloden, battle of, 89, 91, 217

Fleckno's Ghost, by Brennan, 128

Fleming, Mr, verses on Peg Woffington,
Damer, Joseph, 52; Burke's panegyric, 221, 223

54, 104, 107, 147; afforestation, Foolish Miscellany, The, 177, 327
147

Foote, the actor, 173, 174, 319, 320
Dedication to the Cork Surgeon, The, Foote, Lundy, auditor C.H.S., 206
201, 202, 385

Fortune's Tricks in Forty Six, 155
Delaney, Josey, a servant at Ballitore, Foster, Rev. John, F.T.C.D., examines

Burke for scholarship, 94
Denham, Sir John, 150, 157,

Foundling, The (E. Moore's play), Burke
Dennis, William,

Burke's college chum, criticises, 175, 321, 322
54; enters T.C.D., 209; description Free Briton's Advice to the Citizens of
of Burke's father, 96; writes Brutus' Dublin, four pamphlets signed Hel-
Letter to the Town, 119, 128, 209; vidius Priscus, submitted as written
criticism on Othello, 131, 148; Burke's by Burke, 190; support Lucas, 191,
poem Dennis Turning Critick, 132; his 336 (see Lucas Controversy Pam-
lost correspondence, 138; joint letter phlets, Appendix III, 332-395)
with Burke describing Club debates French, Patrick, marries Juliana Burke, 6
and Black Dog Riot, 139–141; joint French and English acting contrasted,
letter with Burke, 148-150; Burke's

168, 304, 305
correspondence with, 154; original Fuller, Elizabeth (Richard Shackleton's
member of the Club, 202; panegyric first wife), 45, 151, 153, 164, 178 (see
on Lord Chancellor Jocelyn, 209;

“Belinda'')
censor, 209; his career, 209–214; his
poem, Man's Redemption, 210; Burke's Genoese, Burke on, 230
marriage, 211; on Burke and Lord Gentleman, The, “But of the Run," 129
Egmont, 211; controversy with Gentlemen's Party,” the, Smock Alley
Sheridan, 212; his exposition of The

riot, 118
Sublime and Beautiful, 212; contrasts Georgics, Burke's translation, 91, 92, 153
Burke and Hutcheson, 212; letter to Goldsmith, Oliver, on Burgersdyck, 29;
Shackleton, 214; treasurer of the Club, his tutor Wilder, 75; a college spree,
247 (see Club Minutes, passim, Ap- 75; his medical degrees, 75, 76; the
pendix I, 225-295)

Black Dog Riot, 144; admonished, 145;
Dependence of Ireland, 184, 188, 234- Bishop Barnard “sly boots,” 145; On
237, 364-369, 376-379

the Several Conditions of Life(?),
Diabetes, 180, 198

170, 308
Dillon, John, his duel with Keatinge, 76 Granville, Lord, Burke's association
Dix, E. R. McC., Mr, 160, 269

with, 211

22, 38

a

Hamilton, Joseph, member of the Club,

143, 207 (see Club Minutes passim,
App. I, 225-295)
Harding, Ambrose, friend of Burke's

father, 50; his clerk's suicide, 51;

mentioned in Richard Burke's will, 405
Harrington, Earl, Lord-Lieutenant, 187,

194 (see Lucas Controversy)
Hastings, John, F.T.C.D., 94
Hawley, General, 89, 247
Hazlitt, on Burke and Lord Egmont, 211
Helim to Aram, letters, 61-63
Helvidius Priscus, 190, 191, 336
Henley, Dr, 177
Hennessy, Miss Polly, 101
Hennessy, Mrs, 97
Herbert, Newcomen, a friend of Burke,

23, 25; describes comet of 1743, 26;
referred to, 36, 40, 53; joint letter
with Burke, 72; describes alarms in
Dublin in 1745, 73; sails for East
Indies, captured at sea, 74,88; Burke's

description of him, 78
Hibernia, magazine, 138
Hiffernan, Dr Paul, The “Tickler,” at-

tacks on Sheridan and Lucas, 119; criti-
cises the Reformer, 163, 309; the Lucas

Controversy, 171, 172, 182, 309, 336
Hill, Hugh, enters T.C.D. along with

Burke, 20, 21
Hissing, in theatres, 169, 305
Historical Club (see College Historical

Society), 26, 64, 134, 203, 205
Homer, 22, 24, 100, 167, 302, 303, 357
Horace, 22, 23, 24, 80, 83, 193, 358
Huguenots at Ballitore, 39, 55
Huske, General, 247
Hutcheson, Francis, on Beauty and

Virtue, 212
Ikerrin, Lord and Lady, portraits by

Sisson, 102
Immoral plays, 168, 169, 299, 300, 321
Ireland (see Boeotia), (see Dependence

of Ireland)
Ireland Sixty Years Ago, 74, 113
Irish manufactures, 169, 234, 306, 307
Jacobite rising (1745-6), 89, 90, 217, 244
Johnson, Dr,

commends Lucas, 202
Jones, Henry (“The Bricklayer"), poem

Kearney, Rev. Michael (F.T.C.D.), 24,

on Booth's lectures, 66
Jonson, Ben, Burke's admiration for,

166, 301
Judge, tenure, 185, 187; office of, 394
Julia and Belinda, Shackleton's poem,

45, 151, 153, 164
Justice, article by “B” in Censor, 394
Juvenal, 24, 98, 100, 106, 129, 386
Kearney, Benjamin (Attorney), 58, 152
Kearney, Rev. John (F.T.C.D.), Pro-

vost, 152

27, 64, 65; on T.C.D. matriculation,

24; examined by Burke, 152
Keatinge, Maurice, duel with Dillon, 76
Kirkman's Don Bellianis of Greece, 45-48
Kissing, on stage, 168, 304
Labourers, Irish, miserable condition,

172, 316
La Touche, James Digges, 186, 188,

193, 202 (see The Naked Truth pam-

phlet, 356–360)
Lecky, on Burke in T.C.D., 135; the

Annual Register, 216
Lecturer Lectured, The, skit on Dr J.

Taylor, 86
Lee, Nathaniel,“fustian tragedies," 166,

169, 300, 304
Leland, Thomas, F.T.C.D., 94
Letter to a Member of Parliament,198,372
Letter to the Cork Šurgeon, 202, 388
Letter to the Duke of Dorset, 199, 301,

376–385, 388
Letters to the Citizens of Dublin, The,

195, 196, 199; First, 363-371; Second,

372–384
Lettres Persanes, Montesquieu's, 60
Liberty of the Press, 196, 197, 379
Liffey, its “dead dogs,"36; floods, 63,83
Litten, Anthony, The Cork Surgeon, 182,

189, 364, 388 (see Cox, Sir Richard)
London Evening Post, description of

Burke, 14, 402; misunderstanding and
correspondence between Burke and

R. Shackleton, 15, 398-401
Longinus, 109, 126, 178, 394
Lovat, Lord, debate in Club, 231
Love, 51–53
Love for Love, Congreve's play, 301
Lucas Detected, by Sir James Taylor, 182
Lucas, Charles, defends students' action

in theatre riot, 118, 119; The Book of
the Prophet Lucas, 120; the Lucasian
controversy, 180-202; his pamphlets,
181; groundless legend that Burke
opposed him, 180; his style, 182; The
Dublin Apothecary (Lucas) mistaken
for the Cork Surgeon (Sir Richard
Cox), 183; the Dublin Corporation,
185; contest with Aldermen, 186; re-
fused a Quo Warranto, 186; The
Complaints of Dublin, 187; Earl Har-
rington, 187, 194; attacks on Chief
Justice Marlay, 187; Irish depend-
ence, 188, 358; La Touche and Lucas,
candidates for Parliament, 188; Lucas'
petition to George II, 188; refused by
Lord Justices, 189; the Censor, 189,
389; the Free Briton's pamphlets, 190;
Epaminondas, 191, 332; Sir R. Cox
carries resolution that Lucas is an
enemy to his country, 194; Chief Jus-
tice Marlay's charge, 195; Lucas flies,

195; Aristides, 197, 198, 371; M.P., patriot of 1731 contrasted with the
M.D. honoris causa, 198

supple courtier of 1749
Lucas Controversy Pamphlets (1748– The Letter to the Duke of Dorset

1749) (submitted as Burke's), Ap- (1731), an analysis and comparison,
pendix III, 332–395

376–379; a review of the British con-
A Free Briton's Advice to the Free stitution, 379; A Patriot Commonalty,
Citizens of Dublin, no. I, 331; an 380-384
individual may rouse a nation from A Patriot's Letter to the Duke of
despondency; Thrasybulus, Phocion, Dorset (1731), etc. with A Dedication
Epaminondas, 332; Fabricius, 333; to the Cork Surgeon, 385, 386;
Cincinnatus, Regulus, Cato, 334; ap-

Machiavel's politics outdone, 386;
peal to citizens of Dublin; the spirit the Cork Surgeon's dream, 386
of liberty, 335; dangers of corruption, A Letter to the Cork Surgeon, 388;
336; Helvidius Priscus, 336

Peter Wilson's advertisement, 388
A Free Briton's Advice, etc., no. II, The Censor, no. VIII, patriotism
337–342; the constitution—the pro- and faction; Brutus' letter to Cicero,
perty of every individual, 337;

balance 390; no. X, the teachings of history,
of power in the community, 338; Cyrus, The Cyropedia, 391; no. XIII,
sketch of the constitution of repub- Fame, Themistocles, Athens, Phocion,
lican Rome; nobles and commoners; Xenophon, a saying of Socrates, 392,
the Valerian law; the consuls and 393; no. XXII, Fame (continued),
tribunes, 339; lessons for Dublin, Pompey, Epaminondas, the phases of
340; the spirit of liberty, 341; the vanity, 394; no. XXIII, judges and
mean between faction and licence, 342 the administration of justice, 394;

A Free Briton's Advice, etc., no. III, Reference to Lucas and Chief Justice
342–348; the Roman constitution Marlay, 395
(continued), 343; struggles of the
factions, 344-346; warning to Dublin Machiavel,the Cork Surgeon outdoes,386
citizens, 347; freedom of election MacKnight,

Thomas, Life of Burke, on
must be preserved, 348; a dawn of Burke in T.C.D., 135; rejects legend
liberty, 348

that Burke attacked Lucas, 180; on
A Free Briton's Advice, etc., no. IV, Burke and Shakespeare, 166
349–355; the fall of the Roman Re- Maevius (Burke), 133, 134
public, 349-352; “patriotism sicken- Malebranche, 68
ed, corruption forged, and faction Mallow races, 78
rivetted the fetters,” 352; warning to Marlay, Chief Justice (see Lucas), 185;
Dublin; the methods of corrupters, charge to Dublin Grand Jury, 195,
bribery of classes, self enslavement of 197, 395 (see Liberty of the Press)
the community, 353; appeal to the Mechel, the dancer, 169, 305
Dublin electors, 355

Meddler, The, a Dublin miscellany, 50,
The Naked Truth, etc. etc., 356–362; 61; letters from Helim to Aram, 61, 63
the coming election, 356; Lucas de- Microcosm, the, 23, 27
scribed, 357–360; La Touche describ- Milton, Sin and Death, 161, 297; Il
ed, 360, 361; appeal to the electors Penseroso, 221; read in the Club, 138,
to support them, 362

230, 233, 250; Molock's speech, 266;
A Letter to the Citizens of Dublin, Satan's speech, 277,288, 293 ; 386,388,
363-371; “Court Patriots,” 364; the 391
Cork Surgeon examined; “pernicious

Mirza (Burke), 59
tendency and absurdity of his writ- Mohun, Mathew, member of Club, 139;
ings,” 364; his doctrine of depend- first president, 203; 207 (see Club
ency, 365-369; the woollen manu- Minutes passim, 225-295)
facture, 367; his slanders on Lucas Monanimy, 2,8
and Dublin, 369; freedom of the press, Montesquieu, 60,
370; Lucas compared to Aristides, 371 Moore, Edward, his play The Foundling,

A Second Letter to the Citizens of 174, 321
Dublin, and Letter to a Member of Morley, Lord, 36, 98, 180, 181, 214, 215
Parliament, 372–375; the patriot Mulla, river, 9, 111
Prince; the tottering constitution, Murray, John, schoolfellow of Burke, 54
373; the directors and tools of cor-
ruption, 373; an intrepid minority, Nagle, Mary, mother of Edmund Burke
374; necessity for a coalition, 375; (see Burke, Mary)
The Second Letter, etc., 375–384; the Nagles, of Ballyduff, 5; see Richard
Court Patriot again, 376; the furious Burke's will, 407

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