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INDEX

Abolitionism, the right way to re-
gard, 13.

Abolitionist, Lincoln declared an,
90.

Abolitionists, southern recruits
among, 76.

Admission of states into Union,
Lincoln's position as to, 117,
118.

Africa, return of negroes to, 76,
103.

African slave-trade, forbidden,

77, 78; revival of, by Doug-
las's popular sovereignty doc-
trine, 146, 147, 196; period of
extinguishment of, 154; Dem-
ocratic call for revival of, 159.
Aliens, Lincoln's attitude toward,
143.

Allen, Col. Robert, letter to, 6.
Ambition, Lincoln's personal, 5 ;
misdirected, 12, 15, 275; well
directed, 14, 275.
American Baptist home mission
society, preamble and resolu-
tions of, 299.
American people, patriotism of,
7, 8, 11-15, 191; resources,
advantages, and powers of,
276, 310; loyalty of, 203, 204,
308, 309, 316.

Amnesty, offer of general pardon
and, 311.

Anarchy, tendencies toward, 11;
relation to secession, 195.
Anderson, W. G., letter to, 28.
Andrews, sentenced to be

shot for desertion, 291.
Antietam, battle of, 259.
Apprenticeship of negroes, 273,

321.

Army of the Potomac, McClel-
lan's plans for movement of,
contrasted with the president's,
216; McClellan relieved from
command of, 260; congratula-
tions to, 269; Hooker assigned
to command, 275.
Asbury, Henry, letter to, 136.
Ashmun, George, letter to, 176.
Assassination, reason for, 163.
Atlanta, Ga., Sherman's march
to Savannah from, 313.
Autobiography of the president,
104, 327.

Baker, Col. E. D., Campbellite
influence for, 47; patriotism
of, 265.

Baltimore, Md., address at sani-
tary fair in, 295.
Banks, Maj.-Gen. Nathaniel P.,

letter to, regarding impedi-

menta, 263.
Barnburners, support Gen. Tay-
lor, 60.

Bedell, Grace, letter to, 178.
Belmont, August, letter to,

239.

Bible, as authority for slavery,
125, 148.

Bixby, Mrs., mother of five sons
killed in battle for the Union,
letter to, 308.

Black Hawk war, Lincoln's ser-
vice in, 64, 104.
Black Republicanism, southern
definition of, 161.

Blair, Frank P., Jr., gradual
emancipation scheme, 130.
Bramlette, Thomas E., governor
of Kentucky, conversation with,
regarding working of emanci-
pation, 293.

Brooks, Preston S., on slavery,
132, 135.

Brown, Gratz, gradual eman-
cipation scheme, 130.
Brown, John, war-cry of Demo-

crats against Republicans, 160;
Republicans not implicated,
160, 161; peculiarity of his
insurrection, 163.
Browning, O. H., 57, 107; letter
to, 209.

Browning, Mrs. O. H., letter to,

21.

Buchanan, James, Pierce's opin-
ion of his election, 93; likened
to Lear, 94.
Bullitt, Cuthbert, letter to, 236.

Burnside, Maj.-Gen. Ambrose E.,
letter to, 281.

Butler, Maj.-Gen. B. F., feeds
negroes at New Orleans, 251';
in Louisiana, 262.

Cabinet, Seward declares that
there must be union in the,
200; question of dismissing a
member of the, 302; disap-
proves the recommendation of
appropriation of money for the
southern states, 316.
Cameron, Simon, suggests arm-
ing of negroes, 294.
Canisius, Theodore, letter to, 143.
Capital, relation of labor and,
213, 214.

Cass, Gen. Lewis, invasion of
Canada, 64; eating and work-
ing capacities of, 65-67.
Central America, question of ne-
gro colonization in, 246, 247.
Chase, Salmon P., Lincoln's opin-
ion of, 147, 175.
Chicago, Ill., fragment of speech
at Republican banquet, 93;
speech at, 105; speech at, 139;
Republican national conven-
tion at, 176; reply to commit-
tee from religious denomina-
tions of, asking the president
to issue a proclamation of
emancipation, 250.

Cincinnati, Ohio, speech at, 147.
Clay, Henry, campaign work for,
in Indiana, 48; on annexation
of Texas, 51; presidential pos-
sibilities, 57; influence on Tay-

lor's nomination, 57; an "old
horse turned out to root," 62;
failure to effect gradual eman-
cipation, 86; position on sla-
very, 115; Lincoln's beau-ideal,
115; on slavery in district of
Columbia, 119.

Cleveland, Ohio, address at,
184.

Colfax, Schuyler, letter to, 144.
Colonization of negroes, question
of. 76, 103, 114, 233; address
to deputation of colored men
on, 243.

Colored troops, at Jacksonville,

Fla., 278; their weight in the
Union scale, 278, 286, 303, 304;
employment of, 287, 294, 297;
the president desires appoint-
ment of Jacob Freese to a reg-
iment of, 289; massacre of, at
Fort Pillow, 296; the duty of
the government toward, 297;
numbers in the Union service,
304; their hope of reward, 304 ;
attempted employment of, by
Confederates, 321.
Columbus, O., speech at, 147;
address to Ohio legislature at,
183.
Compensated emancipation, rec-
ommended to congress, 217,
225, 285; economy of the
scheme, 219; would shorten
the war, 219; appeal to border
state representatives in behalf
of, 232; preliminary proclama-
tion regarding absolute, 254.
Compromise of 1850, 75, 82, 85,

89; a full settlement of the
slavery question, 81.
Confederate States of America,
desire for peace and reunion in,
314; scheme of appropriation
of money for, 315.
Confederate troops, prayer among,
250.

Conkling, James C., letter to,
regarding Union mass meeting
to be held at Springfield, Ill.,

284.

Cooper institute, New York,
speech at, 157–169.
Cotton-gin, effect of its preven-
tion on slavery, 132, 135.

Declaration of Independence,
rights, equality with whites,
status, etc., of negroes under,
75, 99, 109, 111, 113, 115, 124,
126, 156, 170; the negro's share
in framing, 96; mutilation of,
97; Lincoln's interpretation of,
99, 100; its ultimate purpose,
100; called a "self-evident
lie," 84, 86, 124, 141, 203;
wellspring of Lincoln's politi-
cal sentiments, 187; continued
the federal union, 192.
Deist, Lincoln suspected of being
a, 47.

Delahay, M. W., letter to, 142.
Delaware, estimated cost of
emancipation in, 219.
Democratic party, vulnerable
point of, 25; sheltered under
Gen. Jackson's military coat-
tail, 62; views on slavery, 103,

129-131; degradation of ne-
groes by, 103; exultation over
defeat of Blair in Missouri, 130.
Dictators, who can set up, 276.
Dictionary of congress, brief au-
tobiography for, 104.
Divine purpose, 308, 318.
Divine truth and justice, 198.
Divine will, meditation on the,
257.

Dixon, Senator James, conversa-

tion with, concerning emanci-
pation, 293.
Douglas, Stephen A., fracas with
Francis, 27; Lincoln's speech
at Peoria, Ill., in reply to, 75–
85; purpose to nationalize
slavery, 75, 146; bill to organ-
ize Kansas and Nebraska, 75-
85, 89, 98; on equality of ne-
groes and whites, 98, 102;
claims that negroes were not
included in Declaration of In-
dependence, 99, 126, 156; of-
fended with Lincoln's state-
ment as to "house divided
against itself," 105, 106; per-
verts Lincoln's position in vari-
ous speeches, 106, 112; don't
care policy, 110, 115, 130, 133,
169, 173; construction of the
Declaration of Independence,
110, 113, 126, 156; influence of,
115, 125, 156; position regard-
ing status of slavery according
to the fathers and the Constitu-
tion, 132, 135; on slavery in
the Territories, 131, 133, 152,
154; position as between negro

and crocodile, 149, 173; popular
sovereignty, 152; essay in
Harper's Magazine, 153. See
also Joint Debates, Negroes,
Popular Sovereignty, Slavery,
and other topics of discussion.
Dred Scott decision, Lincoln on
the, 96-102, 110, 128, 156;
Douglas's position on, 96–102,
110.

Duel, arrangements for, with Gen.
Shields, 45.

Durant, Thomas J., letter to
Cuthbert Bullitt from, 236.

Election of 1860, views on fusion
for, 142, 143, 175; danger of
local issues in, 144, 145, 146;
use of money in, 175; nomina-
tion of Lincoln for the presi-
dency, 176.

Emancipation, plans for gradual,
77, 86, 130, 162, 216, 232, 254 ;
Henry Clay on, 115; Washing-
ton on, 158; Jefferson on, 162;
effect of, on suppression of re-
bellion, 217; compensated, 217,
219, 225, 232, 254, 285; mili-
tary, 224, 294; appeals to border
states for, 232, 294; letter to
Greeley on, 248; reply to com-
mittee from religious denomi-
nations of Chicago asking issu-
ance of proclamation of, 250;
its effect in Europe, 252; brings
on the crisis of the contest,
291; unaccompanied by servile
insurrection, 290; conversa-
tion with Gov. Bramlette and

Senator Dixon on working of,
293; letter to A. G. Hodges
concerning working of, 293 ;
the test for complainers of,
294; results of a year of trial,
294; its purpose to save the
Union, 294; in Louisiana, 321.
Emancipation proclamation, pre-
liminary, 253; issued Jan. 1,
1863, 270; a military measure,
272, 286, 290, 294; not to be
retracted by the president, 272 ;
notice of, given beforehand,
276; alleged to be unconstitu-
tional, 286; dislike of, 286.
Equality, definition of, 100.
Everett, Edward, letter introduc-
ing, 255.

Fast day, appointment of a na-
tional, 206.

Federal Union, Lincoln's devo-
tion to, 81, 89, 91, 186, 248, 293;
influence of slavery on the
stability of, 81, 104, 105, 153,
171, 181, 944; house divided
against itself, 104; Lincoln
does not expect it to be dis-
solved, 105, 106; threatened
secession of south in event of
election of Republican presi-
dent, 151, 166; threatened
disruption of, 164, 184, 193;
the one thing necessary to the
salvation of, 182; devotion of
the people to, 182, 186; the
preservation of the business of
the people, 183; perpetuity of,
191; older than the Constitu-

tion, 192; unbroken by ordi-
nances of secession, 192; physi-
cal reasons against secession,
196; confederate avowal of
purpose to sever, 201; its in-
tegrity the primary object of
the contest, 248; the president
declares its restoration his sole
purpose in carrying on war,
248, 303; feeling in the border
states, 253; proposed meeting
at Springfield, Ill., of uncondi-
tional Union men, 286; com-
promise embracing mainte-
nance of, impossible, 286; the
president's endeavor to pre-
serve failing his re-election, 306.
Fort Pillow, massacre at, 296.
Fort Sumter, effects of assault of,
201.

Fortress Monroe, negotiation for

meeting with confederate com-
missioners at, 314.
Free labor, 215; contrasted with
slavery, 74; hurtful effect of
slavery upon, 127, 149, 171.
Free negroes, colonization of, 244.
Freese, Jacob, president desires
his appointment as colonel of
colored regiment, 289.
Frémont, J. C., presidential can-
didacy of, 94; correspondence
with, 207; emancipation proc-
lamation of, 207; need of as-
sistance, 208; visit of Mr. Blair
to, 209; no imputation against
his honor, 209; his proclama-
tion discussed, 210, 211, 294;
in Shenandoah valley, 230; at-

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