Proceedings of the ... Annual Meeting of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin

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State Historical Society of Wisconsin., 1891 - Wisconsin
 

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Page 11 - Are higher rank than a' that. Then let us pray that come it may — As come it will for a' that — That sense and worth, o'er a' the earth, May bear the gree, and a' that ; For a
Page 74 - ... countries like Germany, where, since the introduction of parliamentary government, appropriations for university education have greatly increased. The total cost of maintaining the Prussian universities, as shown by the reports of our Commissioner of Education, is about two million dollars a year. Only about nine per cent, of this enormous outlay is met by tuition fees. The State contributes all the rest in endowments and appropriations. Prussia now gives to her universities more than twice as...
Page 71 - ... to praise the lawgivers of antiquity ; we help to perpetuate the fame of Solon and Lycurgus; but I doubt whether one single law of any lawgiver, ancient or modern, has produced effects of more distinct, marked, and lasting character than the Ordinance of 1787. We see its consequences at this moment, and we shall never cease to see them, perhaps, while the Ohio shall flow.
Page 78 - Alexandria, Rome and Athens under the emperors. It endured at Constantinople and Ravenna. It was revived at Bologna, Paris, Prague, Heidelberg, Oxford and Cambridge under varying auspices, whether of city, church or state; and was sustained by the munificence of merchants, princes, prelates, kings and queens. Ideas of higher education were transmitted to a new world by Englishmen who believed in an educated ministry and who would not suffer learning to perish in the wilderne'ss. The collegiate foundations...
Page 10 - Cursed be the social wants that sin against the strength of youth! Cursed be the social lies that warp us from the living truth! Cursed be the sickly forms that err from honest Nature's rule! Cursed be the gold that gilds the straitened forehead of the fool!
Page 13 - Society, for the election of curators and the transaction of other business relating to the affairs of the Society, shall be held at such time and place, in the month of December in each year, and be conducted in such manner, as the executive committee shall designate.
Page 78 - ... kings, and queens. Ideas of higher education were transmitted to a new world by Englishmen who believed in an educated ministry and who would not suffer learning to perish in the wilderness. The collegiate foundations laid by John Harvard in Massachusetts and Commissary Blair in Virginia were the historic models for many similar institutions, north and south. George Washington, the chancellor of William and Mary, when he became President of a Federal republic, caught up, in the capital of a westward-moving...
Page 74 - The encouragement of higher education by government aid, in one form or another, has been a recognized principle of public policy in every enlightened state, whether ancient or modern. Older than the recognition of popular education as a public duty was the endowment of colleges and universities at public expense for the education of men who were to serve church or state. It is a mistake to think that the foundation of institutions by princes or prelates was a purely private matter. The money or...
Page 96 - A noble popularity must be given to science and art in America. The people of every State should be led to see that the higher learning is not for the benefit of a favored few, but that it is beneficial and accessible to the sons of citizens, of whatever statio'n. In the proper co-ordination of the common school system with the high school and university, the Western States are leading this republic to a more thoroughly democratic state of society, with fewer artificial distinctions of culture, with...
Page 71 - We are accustomed to praise the law-givers of antiquity ; we help to perpetuate the fame of Solon and Lycurgus ; but I doubt ichether one single law of any lawgiver, ancient or modern, has produced effects of more distinct, marked and lasting character than the ordinance of 1787.

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