Property Rules: Political Economy in Chicago, 1833-1872

Front Cover
University of Chicago Press, Oct 25, 1991 - Business & Economics - 295 pages
In Property Rules, Robin L. Einhorn uses City Council records-previously thought destroyed-and census data to track the course of city government in Chicago, providing an important reinterpretation of the relationship between political and social structures in the nineteenth-century American city.

A Choice "Outstanding Academic Book"
"[A] masterful study of policy-making in Chicago."—Choice

"[A] major contribution to urban and political history. . . . [A]n excellent book."—Jeffrey S. Adler, American Historical Review

"[A]n enlightening trip. . . . Einhorn's foray helps make sense out of the transition from Jacksonian to Gilded Age politics on the local level. . . . [She] has staked out new ground that others would do well to explore."—Arnold R. Hirsch, American Journal of Legal History

"A well-documented and informative classic on urban politics."—Daniel W. Kwong, Law Books in Review

From inside the book

Contents

2The Booster System
28
3The Introduction of Segmentation
61
4The Mechanics of Local Control
104
5The Politics of Segmentation
144
6The New Public Interest
188
The Great Fire and the New Public
231
Citation of Poll Books and Election Returns
246
Bibliography
269
Index
285
Copyright

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