The scale of medicines with which merchant vessels are to be furnished, with observations on the means of preserving the health and increasing the comforts of merchant seamen; directions for the use of the medicines, and for the treatment of various accidents and diseases

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Page 195 - ... neglects to serve out the lime or lemon juice, and sugar and vinegar in the case and manner...
Page 2 - ... The master of every such vessel shall serve the lime or lemon juice, and sugar and vinegar, to the crew, within ten days after salt provisions mainly have been served out to the crew, and so long afterward as such consumption of salt provisions continues; the lime or lemon juice and sugar daily at the rate of half an ounce each per day; and the vinegar weekly at the rate of half a pint per week for each member of the crew.
Page 58 - I do think that the use of spirits in cold weather is generally prejudicial. I speak from my own experience. It is very pleasant. The glass of grog warms the mouth, the throat, and the abdomen ; and this, when one is wet and cold, with no fire, and just before turning into damp blankets, is very enticing. But it never did me one atom of good ; the extremities are not warmed by it ; and, when a continuance of exertion or endurance is called for, the spirit does harm, for then you are colder or more...
Page 8 - Every place in any ship occupied by seamen or apprentices, and appropriated to their use, shall have for every such seaman or apprentice a space of not less than seventy- two cubic feet, and of not less than twelve superficial feet, measured on the deck or floor of such place.
Page 58 - Author,—"Several of the men on board our ship, and amongst them some of the best, never touched grog during one or more of the Antarctic cruises. They were not one whit the worse for their abstinence, but enjoyed the same perfect health that all the crew did throughout the four years' voyage. Many of our men laid in large stocks of coffee; and when practicable, had it made for them after the watch on deck. These men, I believe, would willingly have given up their spirits in exchange for coffee;...
Page 196 - ... vinegar, in the case and manner herein-before directed, he shall for each such offence incur a penalty not exceeding five pounds...
Page 9 - Every place so occupied shall be kept free from goods or stores of any kind not being the personal property of the crew in use during the voyage; and if any such place is not so kept free...
Page 192 - Trade shall from time to time issue and cause to be published a scale of medicines and medical stores suitable to accidents and diseases arising on sea voyages : (2.) The owner of every ship navigating between the United Kingdom and any place out of the same shall provide and cause to be...
Page 9 - Every such place shall be properly caulked, and in all other respects securely and properly constructed and well ventilated. And if any such place in any ship is not in the whole sufficiently large to give such space for each seaman and apprentice as hereinbefore required, or is not properly caulked, and in all other respects securely and properly constructed and well ventilated, the owner shall for every such failure to comply with the provisions of this section incur a penalty not exceeding...
Page 4 - Vessels, he shall signify the same in writing to the Chief Officer of Customs of the Port where such Ship is lying, and also to the Master, Owner, or Consignee thereof, and thereupon the Master of such Ship, before proceeding to Sea, shall produce to such Chief Officer of Customs a Certificate under the Hand of such Medical Inspector or of some other Medical Inspector, to the Effect that such Deficiency has been supplied or remedied, or that such improper Vessels have been replaced by proper Vessels,...

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