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A RECORD

OF

HEROISM, PATRIOTISM AND PATIENCE.

3

13
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BY

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L. BROCKETT, M.D.,
AUTHOR OF HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR," "PHILANTHROPIC RESULTS OF THE WAR," “OUR GREAT

CAPTAIN8,"

" "LIFE OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN,” “THE CAMP, THE BATTLE

FIELD, AND THE HOSPITAL," &c., &o.

AND

MRS. MARY O. VAUGHAN.

WITH AN INTRODUCTION,

BY HENRY W. BELLOWS, D.D.,

President U. S. Sanitary Commission.

ILLUSTRATED WITH SIXTEEN STEEL ENGRAVINGS.

ZEIGLER, MOCURDY & CO.,
PHILADELPHIA, PA.; CHICAGO, ILL.; CINCINNATI, OHIO;

ST. LOUIS, MO.
R. H. CURRAN,
48 WINTER STREET, BOSTON, MASS.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1867, by

L. P. BROCKETT,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Eastern

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WHOSE PATRIOTIC CONTRIBUTIONS, TOILS AND SACRIFICES, ENABLED THEIR

SISTERS, WHOSE HISTORY IS HERE RECORDED, TO MINISTER

RELIEF AND CONSOLATION TO OUR WOUNDED

AND SUFFERING HEROES ;

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AND WHO BY THEIR DEVOTION, THEIR LABORS, AND THEIR PATIENT ENLURANCE

OF PRIVATION AND DISTRESS OF BODY AND SPIRIT, WHEN CALLED

TO GIVE UP THEIR BELOVED ONES FOR THE

NATION'S DEFENSE,

HAVE WON FOR THEMSELVES ETERNAL HONOR, AND THE UNDYING REMEM.

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.

PREFACE.

THE preparation of this work, or rather the collection of material for it, was commenced in the autumn of 1863. While engaged in the compilation of a little book on "The Philanthropic Results of the War” for circulation abroad, in the summer of that year, the writer became so deeply impressed with the extraordinary sacrifices and devotion of loyal women, in the national cause, that he determined to make a record of them for the honor of his country. A voluminous correspondence then commenced and continued to the present time, soon demonstrated how general were the acts of patriotic devotion, and an extensive tour, undertaken the following summer, to obtain by personal observation and intercourse with these heroic women, a more clear and comprehensive idea of what they had done and were doing, only served to increase his admiration for their zeal, patience, and self-denying effort.

Meantime the war still continued, and the collisions between Grant and Lee, in the East, and Sherman and Johnston, in the South, the fierce campaign between Thomas and Hood in Tennessee, Sheridan's annihilating defeats of Early in the valley of the Shenandoah, and Wilson's magnificent expedition in Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia, as well as the mixed naval and military victories at Mobile and Wilmington, were fruitful in wounds, sickness, and death. Never had the gentle and patient ministrations of woman been so needful as in the last year of the war; and never had they been so abundantly bestowed, and with such zeal and self-forgetfulness.

From Andersonville, and Millen, from Charleston, and Florence, from Salisbury, and Wilmington, from Belle Isle, and Libby Prison, came also, in these later months of the war, thousands of our bravest and noblest heroes, captured by the rebels, the feeble remnant of the tens of thousands imprisoned there, a majcrity of whom had perished of cold, nakedness, starvation, and disease, in those charnel houses, victims of the fiendish malignity of the rebel leaders. These poor fellows, starved to the last degree of emaciation, crippled and dying from frost and gangrene, many of

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