WOMAN'S WORK IN THE CIVIL WAR: A RECORD OF HEROISM, PATRIOTISM AND PATIENCE.

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Contents

MRS MARY A BICKERDYKE
172
Skotch of her personal appearanceHer gentle tender winning waysThe American Florence
187
MRS STEPHEN BARKER
200
BRADLEY
212
MRS ARABELLA GRIFFITH BARLOW
227
Parentage and early historyRemoval to New OrleansHer son urged to enlist in the rebel
240
MRS WILLIAM H HOLSTEIN
251
The death of her husband Governor Louis P HarveyHer intense griefShe resolves to devote
265
Her birth and educationHer preparation for service in the hospitalsReceives instruction
273
MRS ALMIRA FALES
279
Early labors for the soldiersMr Vassars testimonyGettysburg The campaign of 1864
284
THE HOSPITAL TRANSPORT SERVICE
299
OTHER LABORS OF SOME OF THE MEMBERS OF THE HOSPITAL
316
THE MISSES WOOLSEY
324
ANNA MARIA ROSS
343
Her parentage and familyEarly devotion to works of charity and benevolencePraying
351
Miss Safford a native of Vermont but a resident of CairoHer thorough and extensive mental
357
A native of BostonCame to St Louis in 1861 and entered upon hospital work in January
384
Her birth and parentageHer residence in Germany and SwitzerlandHer fondness for study
394
CLARA DAVIS
399
of Union prisonersTyphus fever ragingThe dangers greater than those of the battle
416
JESSIE HOME
422
PAGI
431
MRS SARAH P EDSON
440
C HALL
448
The cruelties which had been practiced on the Union men in rebel prisonsDuties of the nurses
455
OTHER LABORS OF SOME OF THE MEMBERS OF THE ANNAPOLIS
461
MRS E J RUSSELL
477
sutlerTake this bread and give it to that womanThe Sedgwick HospitalOrdering
480
A scion of an eminent family At Benton Barracks HospitalAt MemphisReturn to
489
Wife of Colonel H CanfieldHer husband killed at ShilohBurying her sorrows in her heart
495
A teacher in IowaVolunteered as a nurse in Benton Barracks hospital Very eficientDied
502
MRS ANNIE WITTENMEYER
509
MRS MARY A LIVERMORE
576
GENERAL AID SOCIETY FOR THE ARMY BUFFALO
590
tifarious laborsThe Military Hospitals in DetroitThe Soldiers Home in Detroit
593
The origin of the CommissionIts early laborsMrs Porters connection with itHer determi
603
The Pittsburg Sanitary Committee and Pittsburg Subsistence CommitteeOrganization of
615
I
617
DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH
621
ST LOUIS LADIES UNION AID SOCIETY
630
Gettysburg and at Mine RunHer health injured by her exposure and excessive labors
643
LADIES AID SOCIETY OF PHILADELPHIA
645
WOMENS RELIEF ASSOCIATION OF BROOKLYN AND LONG ISLAND
650
MRS ELIZABETH M STREETER
659
MRS CURTIS T FENN
666
MRS JAMES HARLAN
676
LADIES DISTINGUISHED FOR SERVICES AMONG
681
MRS LUCY GAYLORD POMEROY
691
MARIA R MANN
697
SARAH J HAGAR
704
MRS JOSEPHINE R GRIFFIN
707
Mrs Harris laborsMiss Tyson and Mrs BeckMiss Jane Stuart WoolseyMrs Governor
713
MRS O E HOSMER
719
MISS HATTIE WISWALL
725
MISS CHARLOTTE BRADFORD
731
PAAR Aunty BigeluwMrs Bigelow a native of WashingtonHer services in the Indiana Hospital
740
MRS ANNIE ETHERIDGE
747
PAGS
754
BURGER STEARNS
760
OTHER DEFENDERS OF THE FLAG
767
THE WOMEN OF GETTYSBURG
775
PAG Names of loyal Southern Women already mentionedThe loyal women of RichmondTheir
779
Miss Jones birth and lineageShe aids in equipping the companies of Union soldiers organized
786
The many necessarily unnamedLadies who served at Antietam Point Lookout City Point
794
farly historyHer first work for the soldiersCollecting suppliesThe clothing contract
796

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Page 762 - Flapped in the morning wind: the sun Of noon looked down, and saw not one. Up rose old Barbara Frietchie then, Bowed with her fourscore years and ten; Bravest of all in Frederick town, She took up the flag the men hauled down; In her attic window the staff she set, To show that one heart was loyal yet.
Page 761 - UP from the meadows rich with corn, Clear in the cool September morn, The clustered spires of Frederick stand Green-walled by the hills of Maryland.
Page 762 - In her attic window the staff she set. To show that one heart was loyal yet. Up the street came the Rebel tread, Stonewall Jackson riding ahead. Under his slouched hat left and right He glanced; the old flag met his sight. 0 Halt! " — the dust-brown ranks stood fast •Fire!
Page 327 - I am not eager, bold, Nor strong — all that is past; I am ready not to 'do At last, at last. My half day's work is done, And this is all my part ; I give a patient God My patient heart, And grasp His banner still, Though all its blue be dim ; These stripes, no less than stars, Lead after Him.
Page 762 - It shivered the window, pane and sash; It rent the banner with seam and gash. Quick, as it fell, from the broken staff Dame Barbara snatched the silken scarf. She leaned far out on the window-sill, And shook it forth with a royal will. ' Shoot, if you must, this old gray head, But spare your country's flag,' she said. A shade of sadness, a blush of shame, Over the face of the leader came; The nobler nature within him stirred To life at that woman's deed and word: 'Who touches a hair of yon gray head...
Page 141 - O, praise an' tanks ! De Lord he come To set de people free ; An' massa tink it day ob doom, An' we ob jubilee. De Lord dat heap de Red Sea waves He jus' as 'trong as den ; He say de word : we las' night slaves ; To-day, de lord's freemen.
Page 769 - I have given to my country all I had to give — my husband — such a gift! Yet I have freely given him for freedom and my country.
Page 762 - Over the mountains winding down, Horse and foot, into Frederick town. Forty flags with their silver stars, Forty flags with their crimson bars, Flapped in the morning wind: the sun Of noon looked down, and saw not one.
Page 86 - ... miles around, everywhere eloquently pleading the needs of the blue-coated soldier boys in the hospitals, the eloquence everywhere acting as an open sesame to the granaries. Now they obtained a little from a rich man, and then a great deal from a poor man — deeds of benevolence are half the time in an inverse ratio to the ability of the benefactors — till they had accumulated nearly five hundred bushels of wheat. This they sent to market, obtained the highest market price for it, and forwarded...
Page 329 - ... was managed at first: The surgeons left in care of the wounded three or four miles out from the town, went up and down among the men in the morning, and said, ' Any of you boys who can make your way to the cars can go to Baltimore/ So off start all who think they feel well enough; anything better than the ( hospitals/ so called, for the first few days after a battle.

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