The United States Magazine and Democratic Review, Volume 17

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Langtree and O'Sullivan, 1846 - United States
 

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Page 151 - Poetry lifts the veil from the hidden beauty of the world, and makes familiar objects be as if they were not familiar...
Page 252 - And it came to pass that night, that the angel of the LORD went out, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians an hundred fourscore and five thousand : and when they arose early in the morning, behold, they were all dead corpses.
Page 5 - ... our manifest destiny to overspread the continent allotted by Providence for the free development of our yearly multiplying millions.
Page 155 - THE FRUITS AND FRUIT TREES OF AMERICA, Or, the Culture, Propagation, and Management in the Garden and Orchard of Fruit Trees generally; with descriptions of all the finest varieties of fruit, native and foreign, cultivated in this country.
Page 124 - Thus much I should perhaps have said, though I were sure I should have spoken only to trees and stones; and had none to cry to but with the prophet
Page 218 - Labor is worship !" — the robin is singing; " Labor is worship !" — the wild bee is ringing : Listen ! that eloquent whisper upspringing Speaks to thy soul from out Nature's great heart. From the dark cloud flows the life-giving shower ; From the rough sod...
Page 153 - Where we worshipped, in the days of yore, Ere the garden of my heart was blighted To the core! I have come to see that grave once more. " Angel," said he sadly, " I am old; Earthly hope no longer hath a morrow, Now, why I sit here thou hast been told." In his eye another pearl of sorrow, Down it rolled ! " Angel," said he sadly,
Page 443 - I am loth to quote, yet inasmuch as the laws of all nations are doubtless raised out of the ruins of the civil law, as all governments are sprung out of the ruins of the Roman Empire, it must be owned that the principles of our law are borrowed from the civil law and therefore grounded upon the same reason in many things.
Page 454 - We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not breaths; In feelings, not in figures on a dial. We should count time by heart-throbs. He most lives Who thinks most — feels the noblest — acts the best.
Page 65 - As they who shunned the household maid Beheld the crown upon her, So all shall see your toil repaid With hearth and home and honor. Then let the toast be freely quaffed, In water cool and brimming, — " All honor to the good old Craft, Its merry men and women ! " fall out again your long array, In the old time's pleasant manner : Once more, on gay St.

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