Abraham Lincoln and His Books

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M. Field, 1920 - 108 pages
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Page 57 - succeed. With that assistance, I cannot fail. Trusting in Him who can go with me, and remain with you, and be everywhere for good, let us confidently hope that all will yet be well. To His care commending you, as I hope in your prayers you will commend me, I bid you an affectionate farewell.
Page 17 - The mossy marbles rest On the lips that he has pressed, In their bloom; And the names he loved to hear Have been carved for many a year On the tomb.
Page 58 - our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, a proclamation was issued by the President of the United States, containing, among other things, the following, to wit: "That on the first day of January, in
Page 59 - the United States, in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this first day of January, in the year
Page 67 - seemed to me, the best natural talent in that department I ever knew. And yet he was singularly modest and deferential in social intercourse. My acquaintance with him began less than two years ago; yet through the latter half of the intervening period it was as intimate as the disparity of our ages and my engrossing
Page 60 - Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the independence of the United States of America the eighty-seventh. ABRAHAM LINCOLN. By the President: WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary
Page 67 - pastimes; and I never heard him utter a profane or an intemperate word. What was conclusive of his good heart, he never forgot his parents. The honors he labored for so laudably, and for which in the sad end he
Page 58 - BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OP AMERICA: A Proclamation Whereas, on the twenty-second day of September, in the year of
Page 23 - party than for the glory of the nation and the honor of the dead. We pass over the silly remarks of the President; for the credit of the nation we are willing that the veil of oblivion shall
Page 13 - his zeal and so lavish in praise of his every act that one is almost driven to believe that Burke never made a mistake or a failure in his life. History is not history unless it is the truth.

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