Works for Children and Young Adults: Biographies

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University of Missouri Press, 2001 - African Americans - 336 pages
The twelfth volume of The Collected Works of Langston Hughes contains Hughes's collections of biographies for children and young adults - Famous American Negroes, Famous Negro Music Makers, and Famous Negro Heroes of America - gathered together for the first time. In these works, Hughes sought to remedy decades of historical and cultural neglect by telling the stories of African Americans who had made vital contributions to the construction of the American identity. Hughes made clear his commitment to an inclusive and diverse accounting of the achievements of African Americans on American soil, from vernacular expression to high culture, oratory to combat, geographical exploration to intellectual introspection. His lively and dramatic portraits of African Americans such as Crispus Attucks, Frederick Douglass, Jackie Robinson, and Mahalia Jackson, battling against exclusivity and adversity to achieve their full potential, present a captivating portrait of America. This volume is a valuable record of the emerging African American struggle for civil rights and positive self- determination. It also documents Hughes's interests as he entered the fifth decade of his life and can be read fruitfully alongside his writings for adults at the time, reflecting his sociocultural and political thought.
 

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Contents

VII
27
VIII
32
X
36
XI
38
XIII
44
XIV
51
XV
59
XVI
62
XLI
171
XLII
174
XLIII
179
XLIV
183
XLV
186
XLVI
190
XLVII
194
XLVIII
197

XVII
65
XVIII
72
XIX
76
XX
82
XXIII
91
XXIV
95
XXV
99
XXVIII
105
XXIX
115
XXX
121
XXXII
129
XXXIII
134
XXXIV
139
XXXV
143
XXXVI
148
XXXVII
153
XXXVIII
158
XXXIX
162
XL
166
XLIX
205
L
211
LII
217
LIII
222
LIV
226
LVI
232
LVII
240
LVIII
246
LIX
261
LX
271
LXI
278
LXII
283
LXIII
291
LXIV
296
LXV
302
LXVI
306
LXVII
309
LXVIII
317
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Page 13 - Should you, my lord, while you peruse my song, Wonder from whence my love of Freedom sprung, Whence flow these wishes for the common good, By feeling hearts alone best understood, I, young in life, by seeming cruel fate Was snatch'd from Afric's fancy'd happy seat: What pangs excruciating must molest, What sorrows labour in my parent's breast? Steel'd was that soul and by no misery mov'd That from a father seiz'd his babe belov'd: Such, such my case. And can I then but pray Others may never feel...
Page 12 - If you should ever come to Cambridge, or near head-quarters, I shall be happy to see a person so favored by the Muses, and to whom nature has been so liberal and beneficent in her dispensations. I am, with great respect, your obedient, humble servant, GEORGE WASHINGTON^ 1 Sparks's Washington, vol.
Page 14 - I, young in life, by seeming cruel fate Was snatch'd from Afric's fancy'd happy seat: What pangs excruciating must molest, What sorrows labour in my parent's breast ? Steel'd was that soul and by no misery mov'd That from a father seiz'd his babe belov'd: Such, such my case. And can I then but pray Others may never feel tyrannic sway ? For favours past, great Sir, our thanks are due, And thee we ask thy favours to renew.

About the author (2001)

Langston Hughes, February 1, 1902 - May 22, 1967 Langston Hughes, one of the foremost black writers to emerge from the Harlem Renaissance, was born on February 1, 1902, in Joplin, Mo. Hughes briefly attended Columbia University before working numerous jobs including busboy, cook, and steward. While working as a busboy, he showed his poems to American poet Vachel Lindsay, who helped launch his career. He soon obtained a scholarship to Lincoln University and had several works published. Hughes is noted for his depictions of the black experience. In addition to the black dialect, he incorporated the rhythms of jazz and the blues into his poetry. While many recognized his talent, many blacks disapproved of his unflattering portrayal of black life. His numerous published volumes include, "The Weary Blues," "Fine Clothes to the Jew," and "Montage of a Dream Deferred." Hughes earned several awards during his lifetime including: a Guggenheim fellowship, an American Academy of Arts and Letters Grant, and a Spingarn Medal from the NAACP. Langston Hughes died of heart failure on May 22, 1967.

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