Republicanism in America: A History of the Colonial and Republican Governments of the United States of America, from the Year 1607 to the Year 1869. To which are Added Constitutions, Proclamations, Platforms, Resolutions. Also, a Brief History of All the Existing Republics in the World

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J. M. Stoddart & Company, 1872 - United States - 653 pages
 

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Page 639 - The Congress of the united states shall have power to adjourn to any time within the year, and to any place within the united states, so that no period of adjournment be for a longer duration than the space of six months, and shall publish the Journal of their proceedings monthly, except such parts thereof relating to treaties, alliances or military operations, as in their judgment require secrecy...
Page 62 - There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said territory otherwise than in the punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted; Provided, always, That any person escaping into the same, from whom labor or service is lawfully claimed in any one of the original States, such fugitive may be lawfully reclaimed and conveyed to the person claiming his or her labor or service as aforesaid.
Page 341 - With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive...
Page 630 - Peace, peace! — but there is no peace. The war is actually begun! The next gale that sweeps from the North will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms!
Page 638 - States under their direction; to appoint one of their number to preside; provided, that no person be allowed to serve In the office of president more than one year in any term of three years; to ascertain the necessary sums of money to be raised for the service of the United States, and to appropriate and apply the same for defraying the public...
Page 286 - Must a government, of necessity, be too strong for the liberties of its own people, or too weak to maintain its own existence...
Page 636 - Freedom of speech and debate in Congress shall not be impeached or questioned in any court, or place out of Congress...
Page 42 - And the articles of this confederation shall be inviolably observed by every State, and the union shall be perpetual ; nor shall any alteration at any time hereafter be made in any of them ; unless such alteration be agreed to in a Congress of the United States, and be afterwards confirmed by the legislatures of every State.
Page 638 - ... either case transmitted to Congress, and lodged among the acts of Congress for the security of the parties concerned : provided that every commissioner, before he sits in judgment, shall take an oath to be administered by one of the judges of the Supreme or Superior Court of the State where the cause shall be tried, "well and truly to hear and determine the matter in question, according to the best of his judgment, without favor, affection, or hope of reward :" provided also that no State shall...
Page 573 - Constitution for the United States and of amendments thereto, they constituted a general government for special purposes, delegated to that government certain definite powers, reserving each State to itself, the residuary mass of right to their own self-government; and that whensoever the general government assumes undelegated powers, its acts are unauthoritative, void, and of no force...

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