The Great Invasion of 1863: Or, General Lee in Pennsylvania. Embracing an Account of the Strength and Organization of the Armies of the Potomac and Northern Virginia; Their Daily Marches with the Routes of Travel, and General Orders Issued; the Three Days of Battle; the Retreat of the Confederate and Pursuit by the Federals; Analytical Index ... with an Appendix Containing an Account of the Burning of Chamberburg, Pennsylvania, a Statement of the General Sickles Controversy, and Other Valuable Historic Papers

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W. J. Shuey, 1887 - Chambersburg (Pa.) - 613 pages

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the part I looked up was well researched

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Page 521 - It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us,— that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to...
Page 524 - Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We are met to dedicate a portion of it as the final resting-place of those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.
Page 546 - The prevailing ideas entertained by him and most of the leading statesmen at the time of the formation of the old Constitution were, that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature ; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically.
Page 418 - Never mind, General, all this has been MY fault — it is I that have lost this fight, and you must help me out of it in the best way you can.
Page 546 - Constitution were that the enslavement of the African was in violation of the laws of nature; that it was wrong in principle, socially, morally, and politically. It was an evil they knew not well how to deal with; but the general opinion of the men of that day was that, somehow or other, in the order of Providence, the institution would be evanescent and pass away.
Page 460 - This view seems to be supported by the fact that in the great battles between the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia, an assault by either upon a strongly fortified position held by its opponent, was almost without exception a failure.
Page 547 - ... rests upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man, that slavery, subordination to the superior race is his natural and normal condition.
Page 547 - Our new government is founded upon exactly the opposite idea; its foundations are laid, its corner-stone rests upon the great truth, that the negro is not equal to the white man ; that slavery — subordination to the superior race — is his natural condition.
Page 547 - Those ideas, however, were fundamentally wrong. They rested upon the assumption of the equality of races. This was an error. It was a sandy foundation, and the idea of a government built upon it ; when the " storm came and the wind blew, it fell.
Page 358 - A shell tore up the little step of the Headquarters Cottage, and ripped bags of oats as with a knife. Another soon carried off one of its two pillars. Soon a spherical case burst opposite the open door — another ripped through the low garret. The remaining pillar went almost immediately to the howl of a fixed shot that Whitworth must have made.

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