Transition of Power: Britain's Loss of Global Pre-eminence to the United States, 1930–1945

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 15, 1999 - History - 403 pages
This book addresses one of the least understood issues in modern international history: how, between 1930 and 1945, Britain lost its global pre-eminence to the United States. The crucial years are 1930 to 1940, for which until now no comprehensive examination of Anglo-American relations exists. Transition of Power analyses these relations in the pivotal decade, with an epilogue dealing with the Second World War after 1941. Britain and the United States, and their intertwined fates, were fundamental to the course of international history in these years. Professor McKercher's book dissects the various strands of the two powers' relationship in the fifteen years after 1930 from a British perspective - economic, diplomatic, naval and strategic.
 

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Contents

Prologue Power and purpose in AngloAmerican relations 19191929
1
1 The end of AngloAmerican naval rivalry 19291930
32
2 The undermining of war debts and reparations 19291932
63
3 Disarmament and security in Europe and the Far East 19301932
95
4 The unravelling of cooperation 19321933
126
5 Moving away from the United States 19331934
157
6 Britain the United States and the global balance of power 19341935
186
7 From Abyssinia to Brussels via London Madrid and Peking 19351937
216
8 Appeasement deterrence and AngloAmerican relations 19381939
248
9 Belligerent Britain and the neutral United States 19391941
278
Epilogue A new order of things 19411945
308
Select bibliography
344
Index
372
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