Essays on the Superstitions of the Highlanders of Scotland: To which are Added, Translations from the Gaelic, and Letters Connected with Those Formerly Published, Volume 1

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1811 - Highlands (Scotland).
 

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Contents

I
3
II
13
III
46
IV
89
V
124
VI
199
VIII
265
X
3
XII
72
XIV
184

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Page 140 - Rise ! Muses, rise ! add all your tuneful breath ; These must not sleep in darkness and in death." She said : in air the trembling music floats, And on the winds triumphant swell the notes ; So soft, though high, so loud, and yet so clear, E'en listening angels lean'd from Heaven to hear : To farthest shores th' ambrosial spirit flies, Sweet to the world, and grateful to the skies.
Page 324 - Between the acting of a dreadful thing And the first motion, all the interim is Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream : The genius, and the mortal instruments, Are then in council; and the state of man, Like to a little kingdom, suffers then The nature of an insurrection.
Page 275 - Through this day's life or death. This day, be bread and peace my lot; All else beneath the sun, Thou know'st if best bestowed or not: And let thy will be done. To thee, whose temple is all space. Whose altar earth, sea, skies, One chorus let all being raise, All nature's incense rise!
Page 265 - Such airy beings awe th* untutor'd swain : Nor thou, though learn'd, his homelier thoughts neglect; Let thy sweet muse the rural faith sustain ; These are the themes of simple, sure effect, That add new conquests to her boundless reign, And fill, with double force, her heart-commanding strain.
Page 208 - Nothing can be more erroneous than the prevalent idea that a Highland chief was an ignorant and unprincipled tyrant, who rewarded the abject submission of his followers with relentless cruelty and rigorous oppression. If ferocious in disposition, or weak in understanding, he was curbed and directed by the elders of his tribe, who, by inviolable custom, were his standing councillors, without whose advice no measure of any kind was decided.
Page 336 - Farewell, happy fields, Where joy for ever dwells! Hail, horrors! hail, Infernal World! and thou, profoundest Hell, Receive thy new possessor — one who brings A mind not to be changed by place or time.
Page 189 - sheep make any resistance, when you " take away the lamb, or any distur" bance afterwards." " Never," was the answer. " How differently am I
Page 72 - But know that in the Soul Are many lesser Faculties that serve Reason as chief; among these Fancy next Her office holds ; of all external things, Which the five watchful Senses represent, She forms Imaginations, Aery shapes, Which Reason joining or disjoining, frames All what we affirm or what deny, and call Our knowledge or opinion; then retires Into her private Cell when Nature rests.
Page 190 - It was a mournful kind of movement, but still it was dancing. The nearest relation of the deceased often began the ceremony weeping ; but did however, begin it, to give the example of fortitude and resignation.
Page 82 - Valley" will not bear a comparison with the " Hall of Eblis." BRIDE OF ABYDOS, A TURKISH TALE. " Hart we never loved so kindly, " Had we never loved so blindly, " Never met or never parted, " We had ne'er been broken-hearted.

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