Amelia Peabody's Egypt: A Compendium

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Harper Collins, Oct 21, 2003 - Fiction - 336 pages

The Egypt that so enticed and enchanted intrepid archaeologist-sleuth Amelia Peabody in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries was a place of wonder, mystery, danger, and the lure of antiquity. Now, with this monumental volume of Egyptian culture, history, and arcania, readers will be able to immerse themselves in the great lady's world more completely than ever before.

Journey through the bustling streets and markets of Cairo a hundred years ago. Surround yourself with the customs and color of a bygone time. Explore ancient tombs and temples and marvel at the history of this remarkable land -- from the age of the pharaohs through the Napoleonic era to the First World War. Also included in Amelia Peabody's Egypt are a hitherto unpublished journal entry and intimate biographies of the Emersons and their friends, which provide a uniquely personal view of the lives, relationships, opinions, politics, and delightful eccentricities of mystery's first family, as well as unforgettable pearls of wit and wisdom from everyone's favorite fictional Egyptologist herself.

Containing nearly 600 black-and-white photographs and illustrations, and articles by numerous experts, Amelia Peabody's Egypt sparkles with unforgettable glimpses of the exotic and the bizarre, the unusual and the unfamiliar -- a treasure trove that overflows with Egyptological riches, along with wonderful insights into the culture and mores of the Victorian era, including the prevalent attitudes on empire, fashion, feminism, tourists, servants, and much more.

A one-of-a-kind collection that offers endless hours of pleasure for Peabodyphiles and Egypt aficionados alike, here is a tome to cherish; a grand and glorious celebration of the life, the work, and the world of the incomparable Amelia Peabody.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Kimaoverstreet - LibraryThing

A wonderful reference book for fans of Elizabeth Peter's Amelia Peabody series! This is a beautiful book, with deckled edges, pretty type, and gorgeous old photographs and sketches. Well-written ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - miyurose - LibraryThing

Between visiting Egypt in the last couple of years and reading Nefertiti a few months ago, I’ve become quite interested in all things Egypt. I’ve enjoyed the Amelia Peabody series, so I thought this ... Read full review

Contents

Preface Elizabeth Peters
13
Napoleon to World War I
19
An Expert Analysis of the Principles of Islam
101
The Art Architecture of Islam
112
A Sympathetic Scrutiny of the Victorian Philosophy of Childrearing
156
A Scientific Investigation of Technological Developments
165
An Adept Discussion of the Musical Repertoire of the Emerson Family
173
Victorian Visions of Ancient Egypt
189
Foreign Words Phrases
277
A Quick Refresher Course
329
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Page 122 - Beneath whose awful Hand we hold Dominion over palm and pine — Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, Lest we forget — lest we forget!
Page 122 - If, drunk with sight of power, we loose Wild tongues that have not Thee in awe, Such boasting as the Gentiles use Or lesser breeds without the law, Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet, Lest we forget, lest we forget.
Page 142 - ... The Queen is most anxious to enlist everyone who can speak or write to join in checking this mad, wicked folly of 'Woman's Rights,' with all its attendant horrors, on which her poor feeble sex is bent, forgetting every sense of womanly feeling and propriety. Lady ought to get a good whipping.
Page 176 - I have sought, but I seek it vainly, That one lost chord divine, Which came from the soul of the Organ, And entered into mine. It may be that Death's bright angel Will speak in that chord again, It may be that only in Heaven I shall hear that grand Amen.
Page 186 - A shade of sadness, a blush of shame, over the face of the leader came ; the nobler nature within him stirred to life at that woman's deed and word. "Who touches a hair of yon gray head dies like a dog ! March on !
Page 163 - If a youth, after four or five years spent at school, quits it at nineteen, unable to construe an easy bit of Latin or Greek without the help of a dictionary, or to write Latin grammatically, almost ignorant of geography and of the history of his own country, unacquainted with any modern language but his own, and hardly competent to write English correctly...
Page 126 - I must make a man of you, That will stand upon his feet and play the game; That will Maxim his oppressor as a Christian ought to do,' And she sent old Pharaoh Sergeant Whatisname.
Page 186 - Who would have thought the old man had so much blood in him...

About the author (2003)

Elizabeth Peters earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. She was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America in 1998. In 2003, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Malice Domestic Convention. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.

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