Roman Ingarden's Ontology and Aesthetics

Front Cover
University of Ottawa Press, 1997 - Philosophy - 245 pages
A leading Polish philosopher of the twentieth century, Roman Ingarden is principally renowned in Western culture for his work in aesthetics and the theory of literature. Jeff Mitscherling demonstrates, in this extensive work, how Ingarden's thought constitutes a major contribution to the more fundamental fields of ontology and metaphysics.
Mitscherling provides a study of Ingarden's life, career, and works, and focuses on the genesis and development of this great thinker's philosophical position in relation to that of Edmund Husserl. He summarizes, explains, and illustrates a number of Ingarden's most important investigations presented in The Controversy Over the Existence of the World, a work clarifying the debate between realism and idealism in a more thorough manner than has ever been attempted. He continues by focusing on Ingarden's examination of various sorts of works of art in particular (the dramatic work, the musical work, the painting, and the architectural work) and on his contributions to aesthetics in general.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
A Sketch of Ingardens Life Career and Works
9
Ingardens Interpretation of Husserl
41
Controversy Over the Existence of the World
79
The Literary Work of Art
123
Ingardens Analyses of Other Sorts of Artworks
163
Ingarden and Contemporary Aesthetics
193
Bibliography of Works Cited
215
Index of Subjects
227
Index of Proper Names
235
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 152 - It will be observed that the words, "from out my heart," involve the first metaphorical expression in the poem. They, with the answer, " Nevermore," dispose the mind to seek a moral in all that has been previously narrated. The reader begins now to regard the raven as emblematical ; but it is not .until the very last line of the very last stanza, that the intention of making him emblematical of mournful and never-ending remembrance is permitted distinctly to be seen...
Page 150 - ... in mere pursuance of the ideas I have already explained on the subject of Beauty, as the sole true poetical thesis. The locale being thus determined, I had now to introduce the bird, and the thought of introducing him through the window was inevitable. The idea of making the lover suppose, in the first instance, that the flapping of the wings of the bird against the shutter is a
Page 152 - It will be observed that the words, " from out my heart," involve the first metaphorical expression in the poem. They, with the answer, " Nevermore," dispose the mind to seek a moral in all that has been previously narrated. The reader begins now to regard the Raven as emblematical — but it is not until the very last line of the very last stanza, that the intention of making him emblematical of Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance is permitted distinctly to be seen...
Page 148 - thing of evil—prophet still, if bird or devil! By that Heaven that bends above us, by that God we both adore, Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn, It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore: Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore!
Page 148 - Raven has, is in their combination into stanza ; nothing even remotely approaching this combination has ever been attempted. The effect of this originality of combination is aided by other unusual and some altogether novel effects, arising from an extension of the application of the principles of rhyme and alliteration.
Page 147 - When it most closely allies itself to Beauty: the death then of a beautiful woman is unquestionably the most poetical topic in the world...
Page 144 - It is my design to render it manifest that no one point in its composition is referable either to accident or intuition — that the work proceeded step by step to its completion with the precision and rigid consequence of a mathematical problem.
Page 148 - My first object (as usual) was originality. The extent to which this has been neglected in versification is one of the most unaccountable things in the world. Admitting that there is little possibility of variety in mere rhythm, it is still clear that the possible varieties of metre and stanza are absolutely infinite, and yet, for centuries, no man, in verse, has ever done, or ever seemed to think of doing, an original thing.
Page 150 - ... in a desire to admit the incidental effect arising from the lover's throwing open the door, finding all dark, and thence adopting the half-fancy that it was the spirit of his mistress that knocked.
Page 123 - world". — And then (on a higher level) the question of how these idealities can take on spatio-temporally restricted existence, in the cultural world (which must surely be considered as real, as included in the spatio-temporal universe), real existence, in the / form of historical temporality, as...

About the author (1997)

Jeff Mitscherling teaches philosophy at the University of Guelph.

Bibliographic information