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DEATH OF THE PRESIDENT.

As the President of the United States was sitting with his wife in a private box at Ford's Theatre in Washington, on the evening of April 14, 1865, — happy in view of the speedy termination of a protracted civil war, and the fulfilment of his high purpose,

- he received a death-wound from a pistol-shot fired by an assassin. He never spoke afterwards, but lingered until twenty-two minutes past seven o'clock, on the morning of April 15, when he died. The news of his death was received in this city soon after eight o'clock, through a despatch from the Secretary of War, and pro•duced feelings of sadness and alarm never before equalled. By order of His Honor, the Mayor, the bells were immediately tolled, and the flags on all public buildings were displayed at half mast. The places of business and amusement were all closed, and the insignia of mourning appeared on nearly every building, public and private, in the city. An informal meeting was organized early in the day at the Merchants’ Exchange, and a Committee was appointed to prepare and send a despatch to Washington, expressing sympathy for the family of the deceased, and giving an assurance of confidence and support to his constitutional successor ANDREW JOHNSON. The message was forwarded by Mayor Lincoln, with the following indorsement:

MAYOR'S OFFICE, CITY HALL,

Boston, April 15, 1865.
To His EXCELLENCY, ANDREW JOHNSON, WASHINGTON,

D. C.:

I have the honor to forward the accompanying resolution, passed by the citizens of Boston upon hearing of the sad event which has cast the Nation in gloom; and I desire to unite most sincerely in their expression of grief, and in the patriotic resolve to support the constituted authorities in their efforts to uphold the integrity of the Republic.

F. W. LINCOLN, JR., Mayor.

RESOLUTION OF THE CITIZENS.

The citizens of Boston, overwhelmed with grief at the awful calamity which has befallen our common country, in the tragic death of its great and good President, and in the deadly assault upon the wise and sagacious Secretary of State and members of his family, spontaneously assembled at the Merchants’ Exchange, and resolved, that an expression of their strong and fervent sympathy be immediately sent to the surviving members of the afflicted families, in view of the irreparable loss which they and their countrymen have sustained by this sad event; and, also, that a message be sent to Andrew Johnson, the constitutional successor of Abraham Lincoln, as President of these United States, of their confidence in his integrity, his patriotism, and his manhood; and their determination

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RESOLUTION OF THE CITIZENS.

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to give him their undivided and unfaltering support, imploring the blessing of God to guide him with the wisdom and virtue which characterized his lamented predecessor.

ALEXANDER H. RICE,
GEORGE B. UPTON,
JAMES L. LITTLE,
AVERY PLUMER,
ALPHEUS HARDY,
EDWARD S. TOBEY,
PHINEAS STOWE,
E. R. MUDGE,

Committee.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL.

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