Manœuvres, or Practical observations on the art of war. 2 vols. [in 6 pt. With] The practice of manœuvring a battalion of infantry

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Page 103 - The officers and men will remember what their country expects from them, and what a determined body of soldiers, inured to war, is capable of doing against five weak French battalions, mingled with a disorderly peasantry.
Page 90 - ... attack, and put it out of the general's power to execute his plan. The grenadiers could not suppose that they alone could beat the French army ; and therefore it was necessary that the corps under Brigadiers Monckton and Townshend should have time to join, that the attack might be general.
Page 19 - Pitt be interred at the public charge, and that a monument be erected in the Collegiate Church of St. Peter, Westminster, to the memory of...
Page 45 - Neither officer, non-commissioned officer, or soldier is to leave his platoon, or abandon the colours, for a slight wound; while a man is able to do his duty, and can stand and hold his arms, it is infamous to retire.
Page 17 - General Wolfe's Instructions to Young Officers: also his Orders for a Battalion and an Army. Together with the Orders and Signals used in Embarking and Debarking an Army by Flat-bottom'd Boats, &c.
Page 103 - His aim is to deftijoy the mofl confiderable fettlements of the French in North America : it is not againft the induftrious peafants, their wives and children, nor againft the minifters of religion, that he defigns making war. He laments the...
Page 104 - The refolution the Canadians ought to take is by no means doubtful : the utmoft exertion of their valour will be entirely ulelefs, and will only ferve to deprive them of the advantages that they might enjoy by their neutrality.
Page 21 - Officer then at the head of our army. During the whole war he went on, without interruption, forming the military character; was present at every engagement, and never passed undistinguished.
Page 77 - Women and children," such were the orders of Wolfe, " are to be treated with humanity ; if any violence is offered to a woman, the offender shall be punished with death.
Page 46 - A soldier that takes the musket off his shoulder, and pretends to begin the battle without order, will be put to death that instant : — the cowardice or irregular proceedings of one man is not to put the whole in danger.

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