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72

VOW OF ARAPOOISH.

to their honour; and commanded that whoever had taken the skins, should bring them back: declaring that, as Campbell was his guest and an inmate of his lodge, he would not eat or drink until every skin was restored to him.

The meeting broke up, and every one dispersed. Arapooish now charged Campbell to give neither reward nor thanks to any one who should bring in the beaver skins, but to keep count as they were delivered.

In a little while the skins began to make their appearance, a few at a time; they were laid down in the lodge, and those who brought them departed without saying a word. The day passed away. Arapooish sat in one corner of his lodge, wrapped up in his robe, scarcely moving a muscle of his countenance. When night arrived, he demanded if all the skins had been brought in. Above a hundred had been

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that night, nor tasted a drop of water. In the morning, some more skins were brought in, and continued to come, one and two at a time, throughout the day: until but a few were wanting to make the number complete. Campbell was now anxious to put an end to this fasting of the old chief, and again declared that he was perfecty satisfied. Arapooish demanded what number of skins were yet wanting. On being told, he whispered to some of his people, who disappeared. After a time the number were brought in, though it was evident they were not any of the skins that had been stolen but others gleaned in the village.

"Is all right now?" demanded Arapooish. "All is right," replied Campbell.

"Good! Now bring me meat and drink!"

74

HONOUR AMONG CROws.

When they were alone together, Arapooish had a conversation with his guest.

"When you come another time among the Crows," said he, " don't hide your goods: trust to them and they will not wrong you. Put your goods in the lodge of a chief, and they are sacred; hide them in a cache, and any one who finds will steal them. My people have now given up your goods for my sake; but there are some foolish young men in the village, who may be disposed to be troublesome. Don't linger, therefore, but pack your horses and be off."

way

Campbell took his advice, and made his safely out of the Crow country. He has ever

since maintained, that the Crows are not so black as they are painted.

"Trust to their

honour," says he, "and you are safe: trust to

their honesty and they will steal the hair off of your head."

HONOUR AMONG CROWS.

75

Having given these few preliminary par

ticulars, we will resume the course of our narrative.

76

ROUTE TO THE CROW COUNTRY.

CHAPTER VI.

DEPARTURE FROM GREEN RIVER VALLEY-POPO AGIE-ITS COURSE -THE RIVERS INTO WHICH IT RUNS-SCENERY OF THE BLUFFSTHE GREAT TAR SPRING-VOLCANIC TRACTS IN THE CROW COUNTRY-BURNING MOUNTAIN OF POWDER RIVER-SULPHUR SPRINGS -HIDDEN FIRES-COLTER'S HELL-WIND RIVER- CAMPBELL'S PARTY-FITZPATRICK AND HIS TRAPPERS - CAPTAIN STEWART, AN AMATEUR TRAVELLER-CAPTAIN WYETH-ANECDOTES OF HIS EXPEDITION TO THE FAR WEST-DISASTER OF CAMPBELL'S PARTY

-A UNION OF BANDS-THE BAD PASS-THE RAPIDS-DEPARTURE OF FITZPATRICK-EMBARKATION OF PELTRIES-CAPTAIN WYETH AND HIS BULL BOAT-ADVENTURES OF CAPTAIN BONNEVILLE IN THE BIGHORN MOUNTAINS-ADVENTURES IN THE PLAIN-TRACES OF INDIANS-TRAVELLING PRECAUTIONS-DANGERS OF MAKING A SMOKE-THE RENDEZVOUS.

On the 25th of July, Captain Bonneville struck his tents, and set out on his route for the Bighorn at the head of a party of fifty-six

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