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HUNTING ARRANGEMENTS.

"where to choose," and the trader of a rival

company at hand, ready to pay for their services-it was necessary to bend to their wishes. Captain Bonneville fitted them out therefore, for the hunting ground in question; appointing Mr. Hodgkiss to act as their partisan, or leader, and fixing a rendezvous where he should meet them in the course of the ensuing winter. The brigade consisted of twenty-one free trappers, and four or five hired men as camp-keepers.

This was not the exact arrangement of a trapping party; which, when accurately organized, is composed of two-thirds trappers, whose duty leads them continually abroad in pursuit of game, and one-third campkeepers; who cook, pack, and unpack; set up the tents, take care of the horses, and do all other duties usually consigned by the Indians to their women. This part of the

DISPERSION OF THE CAMPS.

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service is apt to be fulfilled by French creoles from Canada and the valley of the Mississippi.

In the mean time, the associated Indians having completed their trade, and received their supplies, were all ready to disperse in various directions. As there was a formidable band of Blackfeet just over a mountain to the north-east, by which Hodgkiss and his free trappers would have to pass; and as it was known that those sharp-sighted marauders had their scouts out, watching every movement of the encampments, so as to cut off stragglers, or weak detachments, Captain Bonneville prevailed upon the Nez Percés to accompany Hodgkiss and his party, until they should be beyond the range of the enemy.

The Cottonois, and the Pends Oreilles, determined to move together at the same

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DISPERSION OF THE CAMPS.

time; and to pass close under the mountain infested by the Blackfeet; while Captain Bonneville, with his party, was to strike in an opposite direction to the south-south-east, bending his course for Pierre's Hole, on his way to Green river.

Accordingly, on the 6th of July, all the camps were raised at the same moment; each party taking its separate route. The scene was wild and picturesque: the long lines of traders, trappers, and Indians, with their rugged, and fantastic dresses and accoutrements; their varied weapons, their innumerable horses, some under the saddle, some burthened with packages, others following in droves; all stretching in lengthening caravans across the vast landscape, and making for different points of the plains and mountains.

PRECAUTIONS ON THE MARCH.

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CHAPTER II.

PRECAUTIONS In dangerous DEFILES-TRAPPERS' MODE OF DEFENCE

ON A PRAIRIE-A MYSTERIOUS VISITER ARRIVAL IN GREEN RIVER VALLEY-ADVENTURES OF THE DETACHMENTS-THE FORLORN PARTISAN-HIS TALE OF DISASTERS.

As the route of Captain Bonneville lay through what was considered the most perilous part of all this region of dangers, he took all his measures with military skill, and observed the strictest circumspection. When

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PRECAUTIONS ON A PRAIRIE.

on the march, a small scouting party was always thrown in the advance, to reconnoitre the whole country through which they were

to pass.

The encampments were selected with the

reatest care, and a continual watch was kept up night and day. The horses were brought in and picketed at night, and at daybreak a party was sent out to scour the neighbourhood for half a mile round, beating up every grove and thicket that could give shelter to a lurking foe. When all was reported safe, the horses were cast loose and turned out to graze. Were such precautious generally observed by traders and hunters, we should not so often hear of parties being surprised by the Indians.

Having stated the military arrangements of the captain, we may here mention a mode of defence on the open prairie, which we

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