The National Capital: Past and Present. The Story of Its Settlement, Progress, and Development

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Post publishing Company, 1885 - Washington (D.C.) - 351 pages
 

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Page 209 - The muffled drum's sad roll has beat The soldier's last tattoo ; No more on life's parade shall meet That brave and fallen few. On Fame's eternal camping ground Their silent tents are spread, And Glory guards with solemn round The bivouac of the dead.
Page 74 - And I further declare and make known that such persons of suitable condition will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service. And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution upon* military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind and the gracious favor of Almighty God.
Page 246 - About ten o'clock I bade adieu to Mount Vernon, to private life, and to domestic felicity; and, with a mind oppressed with more anxious and painful sensations than I have words to express, set out for New York in company with Mr.
Page 276 - He shall not be afraid of evil tidings : his heart is fixed, trusting in the LORD.
Page 261 - States, to which the youths of fortune and talents from all parts thereof might be sent for the completion of their education in all the branches of polite literature ; in arts and sciences, in acquiring knowledge in the principles of politics and good government...
Page 96 - This southeast corner-stone of the Capitol of the United States of America in the city of Washington, was laid on the 18th day of September, 1793, in the thirteenth year of American Independence, in the first year of the second term of the presidency of George Washington, whose virtues in the civil administration of his country have been...
Page 262 - Washington, and his heirs, (partly in consideration of an intimation to his deceased father, while we were bachelors, and he had kindly undertaken to superintend my estate during my military services, in the former war between Great Britain and France, that, if I should fall therein, Mount Vernon, then less extensive in domain than at present, should become his property,) I give and bequeath all that part thereof, which is comprehended within the following limits, viz.
Page 135 - Is given by inserting in every copy published, on the title-page or the page following, if it be a book ; or if a map. chart, musical composition, print, cut, engraving, photograph, painting, drawing, chromo, statue...
Page 258 - ... employment,) to remain in the situation he now is, it shall be optional in him to do so ; in either case, however, I allow him an annuity of thirty dollars, during his natural life, which shall be independent of the victuals and clothes he has been accustomed to receive, if he chooses the...
Page 24 - But it was finally agreed, that whatever importance had been attached to the rejection of this proposition, the preservation of the Union and of concord among the States was more important, and that, therefore, it would be better that the vote of rejection should be rescinded, to effect which some members should change their votes.

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