1829-1836

Front Cover
J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1865 - United States
 

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Contents

To Joseph C Cabell Montpellier September 7
47
Disregard of the state of things at the date of the proceedings
52
J Ingersoll Richmond January 8
57
To N P Trist Montpellier February 15
61
To Mr McDuffie Montpellier March 30
67
L Hurlbert Montpellier May
73
To Edward Livingston May 8
80
for peace Raynevals statements 82
82
Van Buren Montpellier June 3
88
To Edward Everett Montpellier August 5
94
Has within each State the same authority as the constitution of
96
Inefficiency of a supremacy in a law of the land without a supremacy
101
To Edward Everett Montpellier August 20
106
c in Congress New Constitution J s remark as to a hereditary
111
To Henry Clay Montpellier October 9
117
MEMORANDUM NOT USED IN LETTER TO MR STEVENSON
131
To J K Tefft December 3
139
To Richard Rush
142
To Stephen Bates January 24
150
To Robert Walsh
159
To James Robertson March 27
166
To James Robertson Montpellier April 20
171
To James Monroe Montpellier April 21
178
Το June 22
187
To Robert Walsh Montpellier August 22
194
To Joseph C Cabell Montpelier October 5
197
To N P Trist December
204
To N P Trist December 21
212
To E D White M C Montpellier February 14
215
To Philip Doddridge Montpellier June 6
221
To David Hoffman June 13
223
To Joseph C Cabell Montpellier December 27
230
To Professor Davis Montpellier
232
Alleged inequality and want of uniformity and of limitation in case
237
The intention of those who adopted the Constitution guide in
243
Action of the Executive Department Extracts from Executive mes
248
Journal of Convention of 1787 Erroneous inference from the rejec
253
Personal adherence to doctrine stated in letters to Cabell i e free
259
To Thomas S Grimke January 10
266
To Major Henry Lee Montpellier November 26
340
To Edward Livingston Montpellier August 2
346
executive and judicial departments of U S to each other and
349
To Edward Coles Montpellier August 29
354
of the embargo Historical fact Causes of the failure of the
359
To Edward Coles October 15
366
To the New England Society in New York December 20
372
Van Buren February 18
376
To W Cranch First Vice President Washington National Monument
382
To Charles J Ingersoll Montpellier November 8
386
New doctrine that sovereignty is in its nature indivisible c and that
391
Main and immediate object of Virginia evidently being to produce
397
The 7th Resolution always skipped over by the nullifying commen
401
Course c of the reasoning shows that the interposition meant
405
Expressed confidence that the necessary and proper measures would
406
Attempt to father this newfangled theory on Jefferson in the teeth
410
Abstract and technical modes of expounding and designating its char
420
liberty on the face of the earth Considerations An effective pro
426
Fenimore Williston March 19
431
Fenimore Williston May 13
433
ADVICE TO MY COUNTRY
439
ADDRESS TO THE STATES BY THE UNITED STATES IN CONGRESS ASSEMBLED
448
ESSAYS ETC 454484
454
POLITICAL OBSERVATIONS April 20 1795
489
VIRGINIA RESOLUTIONS 1798 1799
506
OF VIRGINIA January 23 1799
515
Objection that collective interposition could not have been meant
519
To Henry Clay Montpellier August 30 1816
556
To Joseph Jones December 5 1780
563
s speech on the bill modifying the tariff Anodyne Surplus rev
568
To Gen La Fayette June 15 39
572
TION
577
approved May 15 1820 III Stat L 582 See letter to Mr Jefferson December 10 1820 Anie
583
To G W Featherstonhaugh Montpellier December 8
603
The nullifying claim for a single State probably irreconcilable with
618
Το
619
Startling consequences Extravagant presumption that no State
650
Comment of the Report on the 7th Resolution Extracts Answer
688

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Popular passages

Page 225 - In that compact; and that, in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers not granted by the said compact, the States, who are parties thereto, have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose, for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits the authorities, rights, and liberties, appertaining to them.
Page 506 - ... copied from the very limited grant of powers in the former Articles of Confederation, were the less liable to be misconstrued) so as to destroy the meaning and effect of the particular enumeration which necessarily explains, and limits the general phrases, and so as to consolidate the states by degrees into one sovereignty, the obvious tendency and inevitable result of which would be, to transform the present republican system of the United States into an absolute, or at best, a mixed monarchy.
Page 547 - ... resist, oppose, or defeat any such law or act, or to aid, encourage or abet any hostile designs of any foreign nation against the United States, their people or government, then such person, being thereof convicted before any court of the United States having jurisdiction thereof, shall be punished by a fine not exceeding two thousand dollars, and by imprisonment not exceeding two years.
Page 546 - The conventions of a number of the states having, at the time of their adopting the constitution, expressed a desire, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers, that further declaratory and restrictive clauses should be added...
Page 517 - States are parties, as limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting that compact; as no further valid than they are authorized by the grants enumerated in that compact ; and that, in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers not granted by the said compact, the States, who are parties thereto, have the right and are in duty bound to interpose for arresting...
Page 521 - All charges of war, and all other expenses that shall be incurred for the common defence or general welfare, and allowed by the united states in congress assembled, shall be defrayed out of a common treasury, which shall be supplied by the" several states, in proportion to the value of all land within each state, granted to or surveyed for any Person, as such land and the buildings and improvements thereon shall be estimated according to such mode as the united states in congress assembled, shall...
Page 506 - That the General Assembly doth particularly protest against the palpable and alarming infractions of the Constitution, in the two late cases of the "alien and sedition acts," passed at the last session of Congress, the first of which exercises a power nowhere delegated to the Federal Government; and which by uniting legislative and judicial powers to those of executive, subverts the general principles of free government, as well as the particular organization and positive provisions of the federal...
Page 524 - Constitution ; and the other of which acts, exercises in like manner, a power not delegated by the Constitution, but on the contrary, expressly and positively forbidden by one of the amendments thereto ; a power, which more than any other, ought to produce universal alarm, because it is levelled against...
Page 253 - To establish public institutions, rewards, and immunities for the promotion of agriculture, commerce, trades, and manufactures.
Page 315 - Constitution, to decide in the last resort, this resort must necessarily be deemed the last in relation to the authorities of the other departments of the government; not in relation to the rights of the parties to the constitutional compact, from which the judicial, as well as the other departments, hold their delegated trusts. On any other hypothesis, the delegation of judicial power would annul the authority delegating it; and the concurrence of this department with the others in usurped powers,...

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