The Theory and Practice of Banking, Volume 2

Front Cover
Longmans, Green, Reader, & Dyer, 1886 - Banks and banking - 4 pages

From inside the book

Contents

The circumstances of this failure prove the solidity of
16
securities
17
Their description of the extraordinary debasement of
18
General revival of prosperity in 1823
21
His evidence on the subject
24
Banking panic in the autumn and winter of 1825
28
They recommend an assimilation of the English and Irish
30
Evidence of Mr Chambers
32
Fifth exampleThe American banking convulsions of 183739 264
33
55
37
Demonstration of the fallacy of this theory on the principles
39
Report of 1810 identical in principal with that of 1804
42
Bullion is only the regulator of its amount
45
Discussion of the points of difference
48
The circulation of Scotch 1 notes in England forbidden 129
49
Effects of the action of this principle
51
Discussion on second point of difference between the
54
First appearance of the heresy that bills of exchange form
55
The same continued
60
in favour of England
63
The same continued
66
116
71
The same continued
72
The crisis an example of the truth of the principles of
80
129
83
Table shewing the chief variations in the marketprice
95
Mismanagement of the Bank in 1818
98
Great drain of bullion in 181819appointment of Com
110
Opinion of Mr Ward Director of the Bank
116
The speculative mania not attributable to the Bank or
120
38
121
Opinion of Mr Baring
122
Speech of Sir Robert Peel
126
Scotch Banking system
128
Decline of bullion in the Bank in 1836
139
CHAPTER XII
150
Judicious conduct of the Bank during this drain
164
25
168
Improved management of the Bank
178
Meeting of Parliament in November 1847
188
Notes issued in excess of the
190
Third Suspension of the Bank Charter
195
2
199
The optional clauses in the Bank Notes
205
The Ayr Bank
209
Great Commercial Crisis in 1793
217
On the Right of the Scotch Banks to open Branches in England
237
82
242
ON SOME
243

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 484 - Where the instrument contains or a person adds to his signature words indicating that he signs for or on behalf of a principal, or in a representative capacity, he is not liable on the instrument if he was duly authorized; but the mere addition of words describing him as an agent, or as filling a representative character, without disclosing his principal, does not exempt him from personal liability.
Page 496 - Partial, that is to say, an acceptance to pay part only of the amount for which the bill is drawn ; 3.
Page 490 - In the hands of any holder other than a holder in due course, a negotiable instrument is subject to the same defenses as if it were non-negotiable. But a holder who derives his title through a holder in due course, and who is not himself a party to any fraud or illegality affecting the instrument, has all the rights of such former holder in respect of all parties prior to the latter.
Page 474 - Where a banker in good faith and without negligence receives payment for a customer of a cheque crossed generally or specially to himself, and the customer has no title, or a defective title, thereto, the banker shall not incur any liability to the true owner of the cheque by reason only of having received such payment.
Page 342 - ... any body politic or corporate whatsoever created or to be created, or for any other persons whatsoever united or to be united in covenants or partnership exceeding the number of six persons in that part of Great Britain called England, to borrow, owe, or take up any sum or sums of money on their bills or notes payable on demand or at any less time than six months from the borrowing thereof...
Page 484 - But if any such instrument, after completion, is negotiated to a holder in due course, it is valid and effectual for all purposes in his hands, and he may enforce it as if it had been filled up strictly in accordance with the authority given and within a reasonable time.
Page 531 - Interest thereon from the time of presentment for payment if the bill is payable on demand, and from the maturity of the bill in any other case : (c.) The expenses of noting, or, when protest is necessary, and the protest has been extended, the expenses of protest.
Page 524 - Notice of dishonor may be waived, either before the time of giving notice has arrived, or after the omission to give due notice, and the waiver may be express or implied.
Page 523 - Where the instrument has been dishonored in the hands of an agent, he may either himself give notice to the parties liable thereon, or he may give notice to his principal. If he give notice to his principal, he must do so within the same time as if he were the holder, and the principal upon the receipt of such notice has himself the same time for giving notice as if the agent had been an independent holder.
Page 433 - Act had not passed), to pass and transfer the legal right to such debt or chose in action from the date of such notice, and all legal and other remedies for the same, and the power to give a good discharge for the same, without the concurrence of the assignor...

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