On the Trail of Grant and Lee: A Narrative History of the Boyhood and Manhood of Two Great Americans

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D. Appleton, 1911 - 305 pages
 

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Page 102 - Yours of this date, proposing armistice and appointment of Commissioners to settle terms of capitulation, is just received. No terms except an unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works.
Page 270 - April 9, 1865. GENERAL: — I received your note of this morning, on the picket line, whither I had come to meet you, and ascertain definitely what terms were embraced in your proposal of yesterday, with reference to the surrender of this army. I now ask an interview in accordance with the offer contained in your letter of yesterday for that purpose.
Page 264 - GENERAL : — I have received your note of this date. Though not entertaining the opinion you express on the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia...
Page 80 - Save in defense of my native state, I never desire again to draw my sword.
Page 264 - GENERAL :-The result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood, by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the Army of Northern Virginia.
Page 195 - Never mind, General, all this has been MY fault — it is I that have lost this fight, and you must help me out of it in the best way you can.
Page 199 - I am specially indebted for uniform kindness and consideration. You have done everything in your power to aid me in the work committed to my charge, without omitting anything to promote the general welfare. I pray that your efforts...
Page 261 - I see no prospect of doing more than holding our position here till night. I am not certain that I can do that. If I can I shall withdraw to-night north of the Appomattox, and, if possible, it will be better to withdraw the whole line to-night from James river. The brigades on Hatcher's run are cut off from us...
Page 56 - In this enlightened age there are few, I believe, but will acknowledge that slavery as an institution is a moral and political evil in any country.
Page 265 - AM, to-day, could lead to no good* I will state, however, General, that I am equally anxious for peace with yourself, and the whole North entertains the same feeling. The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying down their arms, they will hasten that most desirable...

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