The Early Life, Correspondence and Writings of the Rt. Hon. Edmund Burke, LL. D.: With a Transcript of the Minute Book of the Debating "Club" Founded by Him in the Trinity College, Dublin

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The University Press, 1923 - Dublin (Ireland) - 418 pages
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Page 266 - My sentence is for open war : of wiles, More unexpert, I boast not : them let those Contrive who need, or when they need, not now...
Page 101 - Methought I heard a voice cry " Sleep no more ! Macbeth does murder sleep" — the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast, — Lady M.
Page 228 - O thou, that, with surpassing glory crown'd, Look'st from thy sole dominion like the god Of this new world ; at whose sight all the stars Hide their diminish'd heads ; to thee I call, But with no friendly voice, and add thy name, 0 sun ! to tell thee how I hate thy beams, That bring to my remembrance from what state I fell, how glorious once above thy sphere...
Page 101 - Sleep no more ! Macbeth doth murder sleep, the innocent sleep; Sleep, that knits up the ravell'd sleave ' of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast ; — Lady M. What do you mean ? Macb. Still it cried, Sleep no more ! to all the house : Glamis hath murdered sleep; and therefore Cawdor Shall sleep no more ; Macbeth shall sleep no more .
Page 56 - If e'er ambition did my fancy cheat, With any wish so mean as to be great, Continue, Heaven, still from me to remove The humble blessings of that life I love.
Page 314 - Poor naked wretches, wheresoe'er you are, That bide the pelting of this pitiless storm, How shall your houseless heads and unfed sides, Your loop'd and window'd raggedness, defend you From seasons such as these ? O, I have ta'en Too little care of this ! Take physic, pomp ; Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel, That thou mayst shake the superflux to them, And show the heavens more just.
Page 266 - Main reason to persuade immediate war Did not dissuade me most, and seem to cast Ominous conjecture on the whole success...
Page 107 - Against th' unwarlike Persian and the Mede, Whose hasty flight did, from a bloodless field, More spoils than honour to the victor yield. A race unconquer'd, by their clime made bold, The Caledonians, arm'd with want and cold, Have, by a fate indulgent to your fame, Been from all ages kept for you to tame. Whom the old Roman wall...
Page 217 - It is reconciled in policy ; and politics ought to be adjusted, not to human reasonings, but to human nature ; of which the reason is but a part, and by no means the greatest part.
Page 277 - Who can count the dust of Jacob, and the number of the fourth part of Israel ? let me die the death of the righteous, and let my last end be like his...

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