The New South Wales Law Reports, 1880-1900, Volume 14

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Page 16 - No person is to be required to explain or contradict, until enough has been proved to warrant a reasonable and just conclusion against him, in the absence of explanation or contradiction; but when such proof has been given, and the nature of the case is such as to admit of explanation or contradiction...
Page 17 - ... to warrant a reasonable and just conclusion against him, in the absence of explanation or contradiction ; but when such proof has been given and the nature of the case is such as to admit of explanation or contradiction, if the conclusion to which the proof tends...
Page 255 - Any agreement between members of a trade union as such concerning the conditions on which any members for the time being of such trade union shall or shall not sell their goods, transact business, employ, or be employed.
Page 434 - We may now take for granted that the dealings with these companies are not like dealings with other partnerships, and that the parties dealing with them are bound to read the Statute and the deed of 'settlement. But they are not bound to do more. And the party here, on reading the deed of settlement, would find, not a prohibition from borrowing, but a permission to do so on certain conditions.
Page 537 - It is undoubtedly not competent for the prosecution to adduce evidence tending to show that the accused has been guilty of criminal acts other than those covered by the indictment, for the purpose of leading to the conclusion that the accused is a person likely from his criminal conduct or character .to have committed the offence for which he is being tried.
Page 189 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, . > As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, f We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Page 104 - I think it the duty of this court to adapt its practice and course of proceeding to the existing state of society, and not by too strict an adherence to forms and rules, established under different circumstances, to decline to administer justice, and to enforce rights, for which there is no other remedy.
Page 67 - ... does not in the opinion of the court understand the nature of an oath...
Page 475 - ... any investigation, legal proceeding, or remedy in respect of any such right, privilege, obligation, liability, penalty, forfeiture, or punishment...
Page 534 - On the other hand, the mere fact that the evidence adduced tends to show the commission of other crimes does not render it inadmissible if it be relevant to an issue before the jury, and it may be so relevant if it bears upon the question whether the acts alleged to constitute the crime charged in the indictment were designed or accidental, or to rebut a defence which would otherwise be open to the accused.

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