Japan in Our Day

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Scribner, 1892 - Japan - 293 pages
 

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Page 2 - ... and the windows also have golden ornaments. So vast, indeed, are the riches of the palace, that it is impossible to convey an idea of them. In this island there are pearls also in large quantities, of a red color, round in shape, and of great size ; equal in value to, or even exceeding, that of the white pearls.
Page 2 - It is customary with one part of the inhabitants to bury their dead, and with another part to burn them. The former have a practice of putting one of these pearls into the mouth of the corpse. There are also found there a number of precious stones. Of so great celebrity was the wealth of this island, that a desire was excited in the breast of the grand khan Kubla'i, now reigning, to make the conquest of it, and to annex it to his dominions.
Page 1 - They have gold in the greatest abundance, its sources being inexhaustible; but as the king does not allow of its being exported, few merchants visit the country, nor is it frequented by much shipping from other parts. To this circumstance we are to attribute the extraordinary richness of the sovereign's palace, according to what we are told by those who have access to the place. The entire roof is covered with a plating of gold, in the same manner as we cover houses, or more properly churches, with...
Page 1 - It is of considerable size; its inhabitants have fair complexions, are well made, and are civilized in their manners. Their religion is the worship of idols. They are independent of every foreign power, and governed only by their own kings. They have gold in the greatest abundance, its sources being inexhaustible, but as the king does not allow of its being exported, few merchants visit the country, nor is it frequented by much shipping from other parts.
Page 235 - The Empire of Japan shall be reigned over and governed by a line of Emperors unbroken for ages eternal.
Page 24 - Heusken on horseback with two guards, then his norimono bearers, etc. Next followed a long retinue bearing packages containing my bedding, chairs, food, trunks, and packages containing presents ; my cook and his following. The vice-governor of Shimoda followed with his train, then the Mayor of Kakizaki, and lastly the private secretary of the Governor of Shimoda. A Dutch interpreter was carried in a kago in Mr. Heusken's rear. The whole train numbered some three hundred and fifty persons.
Page 2 - The entire roof is covered with a plating of gold, in the same manner as we cover houses, or more properly churches, with lead. The ceilings of the halls are of the same precious metal ; many of the apartments have small tables of pure gold, of considerable thickness ; and the windows also have golden ornaments. So vast, indeed, are the riches of the palace that it is impossible to convey an idea of them.
Page 278 - By yet another gateway, sculptured and embellished to an extraordinary height, of semibarbarous, but splendid beauty, the step is led to the central shrine itself. All around are detached buildings, soberly but splendidly adorned with the very best which Japanese art could lavish on them, in perfect joinery, gilding, coloring, lacquer, metal-work, painting, and carving. The whole place is full of symbolism. On the outer screens, shutting off the first court, you may have noticed waves of the sea,...
Page 276 - Religion and pleasure go hand in hand in Japan. Observe the old lady, with shaven eyebrows and blackened teeth, belonging to by-gone Japan ; her two daughters, who are of the newer style, and proudly carry European umbrellas, and even black silk gloves. They wash their hands from the temple well by means of a small wooden ladle; approach the altar, pull the thick cord which makes the gong sound, and, the attention of heaven having been engaged, they pray their silent prayers with bowed heads and...
Page 235 - We, the Successor to the prosperous Throne of Our Predecessors, do humbly and solemnly swear to the Imperial Founder of Our House and to Our other Imperial Ancestors that, in pursuance of a great policy co-extensive with the Heavens and with the Earth, We shall maintain and secure from decline the ancient form of government.

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