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whereon never man sat, saying to them, Loose him and bring him to me, and, if any man say aught, tell him the master hath need of him. And they brought the ass, and they spread garments upon him, and Jesus sat upon him. And they cast their garments and the branches of the trees in the way, and the multitudes that went before, and they that followed, cried, "Hosanna! blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!"

And it came to pass in the processes of the Christian generations, as they neared the ends and fulfilments of the dispensation, that certain two discipleships, Religious Faith and Natural Science, were sent forth in the earth by the Master to the region where the mechanical earth powers were hitherto tied up-a beast of work whereon never man sat. And they loosed these earth forces, and they have brought them unto the service of the Master in his kingdom of a Christian manhood. And behold! the fire and the water and the lightning and the light obey and become organic and serving entities. And now the Christian man bids these powers move his machinery, grind and prepare his food, and spin and weave his raiment, and print and carry his thought, and scatter the seeds of universal education and religion and freedom throughout the habitations of men-and they do it! He builds him a huge palace upon the waters, fills it with tons of notions, and bids the water and the fire move it to this point and to that, through a continent, across seas and vast oceans-and they do it! And when Nature's road is out of the way, he mounts his servant upor wheels, and again, at the nod of his master, away he darts with huge burdens, taken from the backs of beasts and men, across mountain, plain, and river, woodland and prairie, with scarce notice to the buffalo and the wild man to clear the track.

But again, he wants a more fleet messenger, to go on errands; and he calls down the lightning of heaven, bids it go, exchange thought and sympathy, and carry tidings between the ends of the earth-and it does it!

But the steam factory and the steamboat and the steamship and the steam-car and the steam-press and the telegraph and the photograph and the world expositions, however wonderful as facts, as results, are lost to the view in their ominous significance of the

the instrumentality of the lowest principles of nature. And that the eternal Son of God again descended into our world is a cause whose effects must follow, a prophecy which the characteristic events of this present age are explaining. Behold! what manner of man is his discipleship of this day, that even the water and the fire and the light and the lightning obey and serve him? And as his dialectic vision shall be further opened toward the supernatural, and his scientific intelligence more opened toward nature, who may dream or guess what and how many servants in Nature's realm yet wait the bidding of this young master? Already, indeed, upon the instrumentality of organized science, that "colt whereon never man sat before," the discipleship of this generation is realizing a triumphal procession into its Jerusalem of marvellous fulfilments.

Hear the summary, as condensed in the comprehension of the Great Napoleon. Said he: "I know men, and I tell you that Jesus is not a man. The religion of Christ is a mystery which subsists by its own force, and proceeds from a mind which is not a human mind. We find in it a marked individuality, which originated a train of words and maxims and events distinctively its own. Jesus borrowed nothing from our knowledge. He exhibited in himself a perfect example of his precepts. Jesus is not a philosopher; his proofs are miracles and he came into the world to reveal the mysteries of heaven and the laws of the spirit. Alexander, Cæsar, Charlemagne, and myself founded empires; but upon what did we rest the creations of our genius? Upon force. Jesus Christ alone founded his empire upon love. hour millions of men would die for him.

And at this

"It was not a day or a battle which achieved the triumph of his cause in the world. No. It was a long war, a contest of centuries, begun by the apostles, and then continued by the floods of Christian generations. In this war, all the kings and potentates of the earth were on one side. On the other, I see no army, but a mysterious force-some men, scattered here and there in all parts of the world, and who have no other rallying point than one common faith in the mysteries of the cross. I die before my time, and my body will be given back to the earth, to become the food for worms. Such is the fate of him who has been called the great

whereon never man sat, saying to them, Loose him and bring him to me, and, if any man say aught, tell him the master hath need of him. And they brought the ass, and they spread garments upon him, and Jesus sat upon him. And they cast their garments and the branches of the trees in the way, and the multitudes that went before, and they that followed, cried, "Hosanna! blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!"

And it came to pass in the processes of the Christian generations, as they neared the ends and fulfilments of the dispensation, that certain two discipleships, Religious Faith and Natural Science, were sent forth in the earth by the Master to the region where the mechanical earth powers were hitherto tied up-a beast of work whereon never man sat. And they loosed these earth forces, and they have brought them unto the service of the Master in his kingdom of a Christian manhood. And behold! the fire and the water and the lightning and the light obey and become organic and serving entities. And now the Christian man bids these powers move his machinery, grind and prepare his food, and spin and weave his raiment, and print and carry his thought, and scatter the seeds of universal education and religion and freedom throughout the habitations of men-and they do it! He builds him a huge palace upon the waters, fills it with tons of notions, and bids the water and the fire move it to this point and to that, through a continent, across seas and vast oceans-and they do it! And when Nature's road is out of the way, he mounts his servant upor wheels, and again, at the nod of his master, away he darts with huge burdens, taken from the backs of beasts and men, across mountain, plain, and river, woodland and prairie, with scarce notice to the buffalo and the wild man to clear the track.

But again, he wants a more fleet messenger, to go on errands; and he calls down the lightning of heaven, bids it go, exchange thought and sympathy, and carry tidings between the ends of the earth-and it does it!

But the steam factory and the steamboat and the steamship and the steam-car and the steam-press and the telegraph and the photograph and the world expositions, however wonderful as facts, as results, are lost to the view in their ominous significance of the

the instrumentality of the lowest principles of nature. And that the eternal Son of God again descended into our world is a cause whose effects must follow, a prophecy which the characteristic events of this present age are explaining. Behold! what manner of man is his discipleship of this day, that even the water and the fire and the light and the lightning obey and serve him? And as his dialectic vision shall be further opened toward the supernatural, and his scientific intelligence more opened toward nature, who may dream or guess what and how many servants in Nature's realm yet wait the bidding of this young master? Already, indeed, upon the instrumentality of organized science, that "colt whereon never man sat before," the discipleship of this generation is realizing a triumphal procession into its Jerusalem of marvellous fulfilments.

Hear the summary, as condensed in the comprehension of the Great Napoleon. Said he: "I know men, and I tell you that Jesus is not a man. The religion of Christ is a mystery which subsists by its own force, and proceeds from a mind which is not a human mind. We find in it a marked individuality, which originated a train of words and maxims and events distinctively its own. Jesus borrowed nothing from our knowledge. He exhibited in himself a perfect example of his precepts. Jesus is not a philosopher; his proofs are miracles and he came into the world to reveal the mysteries of heaven and the laws of the spirit. Alexander, Cæsar, Charlemagne, and myself founded empires; but upon what did we rest the creations of our genius? Upon force. Jesus Christ alone founded his empire upon love. And at this hour millions of men would die for him.

"It was not a day or a battle which achieved the triumph of his cause in the world. No. It was a long war, a contest of centuries, begun by the apostles, and then continued by the floods of Christian generations. In this war, all the kings and potentates of the earth were on one side. On the other, I see no army, but a mysterious force-some men, scattered here and there in all parts of the world, and who have no other rallying point than one common faith in the mysteries of the cross. I die before my time, and my body will be given back to the earth, to become the food for Worms. Such is the fate of him who has been called the great

eternal kingdom of Christ, which is proclaimed, loved, and adored, and which is extending over the whole earth. Call you this dying? Is it not living, rather?"

No; the divinity of this dispensation is not dead. And it is precisely because this divinity, who now sitteth aloft, delivered aforetime the curriculum of this generation, and, as Prophet, Priest, and King leads from on high this mortal race unto its fulfilments, that they that have an eye to see may see, exalted in the heaven, the God of the faith and the God of the country; and not a volatile thing of sense or imagination, but a presence manifesting itself in the forms of social thought and deed. Over religion, philosophy, politics, science, art, broods a mighty world-spirit whose name is Christian. And there is to be seen, visible in all terrestrial things-not in this nor in that ism-not in this nor in that carcass where the eagles are gathered together-but in the diffusion of a distinctive increment of heat and light into the universal mind, manifest as the lightning that shineth out of the East even unto the West-there is to be seen, by those that have the goodly prospect, establishing itself through the lapse' of the centuries, upon the vestiges of the former times and faiths, an invincible empire, united, homogeneous, and all-powerful to fulfil its destinies and its impulses, embracing within its broad arms the men of every nation, creed, and clime. And all the combined hosts of earth, hierarchs, and autocrats, and sham democracies cannot move a printingpress, or construct a railroad, or plant a telegraph post, or stir the deep waters of the public mind, or lash its shoals into commotion, except as the servants and instruments of this empire. Here is manifest the supernatural factor in the Church. The God of the dispensation rules, and therefore men may work and trust.

And this factor is a universal in history. There never was a human country without a god. There never was a historic faith that wrought miracles in the earth by the hand of man without a god. Man does not previde; man does not provide. Man does not frame and project the curricula of the terrestrial generations; man does not arbitrate the social destinies of the race. Therefore it still gets truly said that the idea of divinity threads and unifies

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