History of the United States of America: 1861-1865. The civil war

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As this is a history of the Civil War, it is unlikely to have been written in 1800.
Google Books' inaccuracy in recording publication dates and the lack of any mechanism to fix them is annoying.

Contents

Militia of Northwestern States defend Mississippi Valley
48
Antagonism of slave and free labor systems slave expansion
60
Southern military appointments Lee the Johnstons and Jack
66
First theory of rebellion appeal for the Union as unchanged
68
President Lincolns message confident national resources
74
Retreat to Washington loyaltys sterner task
80
Congress provides men and means the Crittenden resolution
89
Lyons prompt measures disloyalists put to flight
96
FACT
97
Emancipation controversy with President Fremont displaced
102
Grant and his tardy recognition promotion to brigadier
108
Europes attitude toward disunion concert of England
114
Spies and sympathizers checked passports political arrests
120
Our State Department Sewards character and constancy 127McClellan in Washington flattery and high expectation
130
The Union navy Southern disadvantage blockaderunning
137
Buell in Kentucky Thomas victorious at Mill Springs
144
Section VIII
152
Stantons character and energetic methods
158
Johnston confronts McClellans army all the winter
165
Expedition to New Orleans Butler and Porter
169
Island No 10 Albert Sidney Johnston and Beauregard 175Halleck in full Union command relations with Buell and Grant 176 Grant in disfavor appro...
179
Campaign prematurely ended Halleck called to Washington
186
McClellan in the peninsula his morbid distrust
192
From Williamsburg to the Chickahominy
199
The seven days battles base changed to the James
206
Second battle of Bull Run Washington in danger
212
Philanthropic drift in 1862 slavetrade treaty with Great Britain
219
Closer relations with the Northern abolitionists
225
Section XII
232
McClellans military character considered
240
Union assault at heights of Fredericksburg severe repulse
246
Hallecks errors at the West Buell detached Bragg invades
252
Butler at New Orleans intense antipathy Banks succeeds him
260
The slavetrade treaty British philanthropy
272
New policy of 1863 border slave States hesitate to abolish
278
Ample borrowing powers popular investments invited
284
CHAPTER II
290
Composition of armies infantry cavalry and artillery
296
Soldiers monuments North and South
302
Section II
316
Battle of Champions Hill Pemberton reaches Vicksburg
387
Siege of Vicksburg begun its progress 893
393
Distress of the besieged Pembertons surrender 305
400
Vindication of Presidents policy Southern opinion
406
Draft and volunteering on the Union side
414
New enrolment act of 1863 opposition to conscription
416
Civil arrests sweeping conscription act Confederate financial
420
Burnside sustained Vallandighams temporary banishment
422
Flight of Juarez government crown offered to Maximilian
428
Russian relations treaties with China and other nations
435
Rosecrans in Tenuessee Bragg forced southward Chattanooga
442
Return of Bragg battle of Chickamauga 444 Thomass firmness Bragg invests Chattanooga 446 Grant summoned to command Rosecrans relieved ne...
451
Long session opened House organizes President offers amnesty
460
Burnside at Knoxville a loyal welcome Longstreets move
466
Chase leaves the Cabinet Fessenden succeeds 468 Dissensions in Congress reconstruction policy 469Fruitless peace missions temporary despondency ...
472
Section IX
478
Grants high subordinates preparations to move in concert
486
Night march to Spottsylvania Lee opposes
493
Promotions and more troops new march by the flank
500
Sherman commands at the West resources and preparations
506
Hood evacuates Atlanta important capture
513
Section XI
519
Changes in the Cabinet Blair Bates and Fessenden retire
525
Compassion for the negro a freedmans bureau the franchise 631
532
Last efforts of the Davis government 637
538
Grants dogged purpose Burnsides mine approach of winter 644
546
Milledgeville reached the seacoast Savannah captured
552
Hood before Nashville Thomass anxious responsibility
558
CHAPTER III
565
Last session of Confederate Congress public recriminations 669
571
Blockaderunning stopped a hazardous commerce
578
Sherman confers at City Point and returns
584
Lee strongly confronted Sheridans fight at Five Forks
590
The chase to Appomattox a summons to surrender
596
The Confederate government leaves Richmond
604
The last Cabinet meeting reconciling policy proposed
610
Andrew Johnsons accession a sterner policy foreshadowed
616
Great Britain tenders indemnity new treaty negotiated
622
APPENDIX
635
Attitude of our government Mexican default in foreign debt 261Joint invasion of England France and Spain capture of Vera
646

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Page 5 - I shall have the most solemn one to "preserve, protect, and defend it." I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
Page 223 - Mr. President, I approve of the proclamation, but I question the expediency of its issue at this juncture. The depression of the public mind, consequent upon our repeated reverses, is so great that I fear the effect of so important a step. It may be viewed as the last measure of an exhausted government, a cry for help ; the government stretching forth its hands to Ethiopia, instead of Ethiopia stretching forth her hands to the government.
Page 8 - William H. Seward, of New York, Secretary of State; Salmon P. Chase, of Ohio, Secretary of the Treasury; Simon Cameron, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of War; Gideon Welles, of Connecticut, Secretary of the Navy; Caleb B. Smith, of Indiana, Secretary of the Interior; Montgomery Blair, of Maryland, Postmaster-General; and Edward Bates, of Missouri, Attorney-General.
Page 211 - I have come to you from the West, where we have always seen the backs of our enemies— from an army whose business it has been to seek the adversary, and to beat him when found, whose policy has been attack and not defence.
Page 40 - In answer to your requisition for troops from Arkansas, to subjugate the Southern States, I have to say that none will be furnished. The demand is only adding insult to injury. The people of this Commonwealth are freemen, not slaves, and will defend to the last extremity, their honor, lives, and property, against Northern mendacity and usurpation.
Page 56 - In all such territory the institution of negro slavery, as it now exists in the Confederate States, shall be recognized and protected by Congress and by the Territorial government...
Page 60 - With all my devotion to the Union, and the feeling of loyalty and duty of an American citizen, I have not been able to make up my mind to raise my hand against my relatives, my children, my home.
Page 278 - And I further declare and make known, that such persons, of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service. And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind and the gracious favor of Almighty God.
Page 216 - My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it; and if I could do it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that.
Page 75 - That number of men is about one-tenth of those of proper ages within the regions where, apparently, all are willing to engage; and the sum is less than a twenty-third part of the money value owned by the men who seem ready to devote the whole.

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