History of the United States of America: 1861-1865. The civil war

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Dodd, Mead, 1899 - United States
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Written 1899, not 1800 as shown

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

As this is a history of the Civil War, it is unlikely to have been written in 1800.
Google Books' inaccuracy in recording publication dates and the lack of any mechanism to fix them is annoying.

Contents

xiii
91
Europes attitude toward disunion concert of England
114
Expedition against Mexico Russia friendly to the Union
116
Demand of Great Britain an amicable surrender
122
SECTION VII
129
Philanthropic drift in 1862 slavetrade treaty with Great Britain
133
Failure at Balls Bluff an inactive autumn
135
Buell in Kentucky Thomas victorious at Mill Springs
144
Kentucky treated with delicacy fallacy of neutrality shown
145
SECTION VIII
152
Stantons character and energetic methods o
158
Johnston confronts McClellans army all the winter
165
THE MISSISSIPPI CAMPAIGN
169
New Orleans captured Farraguts supreme achievement
174
The first days dangers Grant commands arrival of Buell
180
Campaign prematurely ended Halleck called to Washington
186
McClellan in the peninsula his morbid distrust
192
New enrolment act of 1863 opposition to conscription
198
From Williamsburg to the Chickahominy
199
The seven days battles base changed to the James
207
Kentucky Missouri Maryland and Delaware hold back
209
Second battle of Bull Run Washington in danger
212
Offer of indemnity to States emancipating measures in Congress
220
Grant and his tardy recognition promotion to brigadier
221
Incidents of a new military policy colonization fails
227
Sumner as a statesman his rivalry with Seward
230
McClellans military character considered
240
106
243
Union assault at heights of Fredericksburg severe repulse
246
Hallecks errors at the West Buell detached Bragg invades
253
President Lincolns comments abuses of a reopened commerce
260
France violates compact triple alliance dissolved
264
Confederate cruisers built the Florida and Alabama
270
PAGB
272
New policy of 1863 border slave States hesitate to abolish
278
Tents and barracks wagon trains rations
282
Financial legislation gold and government paper national
283
The President master of his administration
289
SECTION VI
291
North and South in conflict foes of one household
302
American sentiment concerning the negro problem
303
GENERAL TRAITS AND INDUSTRIES
316
PAGE
319
SECTION III
341
FOREIGN RELATIONS AND
427
Flight of Juarez government crown offered to Maximilian
428
THE SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY
434
Russian relations treaties with China and other nations
435
Foreign policy of the Union situation at Lincolns accession
442
Grant summoned to command Rosecrans relieved new supplies
448
Long session opened House organizes President offers amnesty
460
Chase leaves the Cabinet Fessenden succe
468
Democratic convention at Chicago a peace platform
472
GRANT GENERALINCHIEF
478
Burnside at Knoxville a loyal welcome Longstreets move
493
Grants high subordinates preparations to move in concert
495
52
496
Promotions and more troops new march by the flank
509
SECTION X
509
Shermans opportune victory subsistence upon the foe
514
SHERMAN AND SHERIDAN
515
Disloyal plotters at the Northwest raids from Canada
521
Final session of Congress constitutional prohibition of slavery
528
Lincolns latest views on this subject
534
SECTION XII
540
Grants dogged purpose Burnsides mine approach of winter
544
Milledgeville reached the seacoast Savannah captured
552
Antagonism of slave and free labor systems slave expansion
558
CHAPTER III
559
SECOND ADMINISTRATION OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
565
Bitterness of feeling in Southern States
571
Union operations at Wilmington fall of Fort Fisher
575
Blockaderunning stopped a hazardous commerce
578
Sherman confers at City Point and returns
584
Lee strongly confronted Sheridans fight at Five Forks
590
Virginia and South Carolina the latter leads in rebellion
593
The chase to Appomattox a summons to surrender
596
DEATH AND TRIUMPH
604
Davis and Stephens provisional President and VicePresident
605
The last Cabinet meeting reconciling policy proposed
610
Andrew Johnsons accession a sterner policy foreshadowed
616
Great Britain tenders indemnity new treaty negotiated
622
APPENDIX
635
Sherman brings relief retreat of Longstreet
637
349
638
Braggs mortification Confederate changes Johnston arrives 458
646
294 298
647

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Page 5 - I shall have the most solemn one to "preserve, protect, and defend it." I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
Page 195 - Mr. President, I approve of the proclamation, but I question the expediency of its issue at this juncture. The depression of the public mind, consequent upon our repeated reverses, is so great that I fear the effect of so important a step. It may be viewed as the last measure of an exhausted government, a cry for help ; the government stretching forth its hands to Ethiopia, instead of Ethiopia stretching forth her hands to the government.
Page 8 - William H. Seward, of New York, Secretary of State; Salmon P. Chase, of Ohio, Secretary of the Treasury; Simon Cameron, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of War; Gideon Welles, of Connecticut, Secretary of the Navy; Caleb B. Smith, of Indiana, Secretary of the Interior; Montgomery Blair, of Maryland, Postmaster-General; and Edward Bates, of Missouri, Attorney-General.
Page 191 - I have come to you from the West, where we have always seen the backs of our enemies— from an army whose business it has been to seek the adversary, and to beat him when found, whose policy has been attack and not defence.
Page 40 - In answer to your requisition for troops from Arkansas, to subjugate the Southern States, I have to say that none will be furnished. The demand is only adding insult to injury. The people of this Commonwealth are freemen, not slaves, and will defend to the last extremity, their honor, lives, and property, against Northern mendacity and usurpation.
Page 48 - In all such territory the institution of negro slavery, as it now exists in the Confederate States, shall be recognized and protected by Congress and by the Territorial government...
Page 52 - With all my devotion to the Union, and the feeling of loyalty and duty of an American citizen, I have not been able to make up my mind to raise my hand against my relatives, my children, my home.
Page 230 - And I further declare and make known, that such persons, of suitable condition, will be received into the armed service of the United States to garrison forts, positions, stations, and other places, and to man vessels of all sorts in said service. And upon this act, sincerely believed to be an act of justice, warranted by the Constitution upon military necessity, I invoke the considerate judgment of mankind and the gracious favor of Almighty God.
Page 191 - My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery. If I could save the Union without freeing any slave, I would do it; and if I could save it by freeing all the slaves, I would do it; and if I could do it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that.
Page 67 - That number of men is about one-tenth of those of proper ages within the regions where, apparently, all are willing to engage; and the sum is less than a twenty-third part of the money value owned by the men who seem ready to devote the whole.

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