History of the United States of America Under the Constitution: 1861-1865, The Civil War

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Kraus Reprint, 1899 - United States
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Contents

President Lincolns message confident national resources
74
Retreat to Washington loyaltys sterner task
80
Congress provides men and means the Crittenden resolution
86
Military conflict in Missouri Blair and Governor Jackson
92
Lyon killed at Wilsons Creek Fremonts proclamations
100
Anderson Sherman Thomas and Buell Johnston at Bowling
106
Europes attitude toward disunion concert of England
114
Spies and sympathizers checked passports political arrests
120
49
123
Our State Department Sewards character and constancy
127
SECTION III
129
He dislikes the administration Scott makes way for him
133
THE SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY
138
Expeditions to Hatteras and Port Royal Burnside
139
Grant captures Fort Henry Confederates leave Bowling Green
145
SECTION VIII
152
Stantons character and energetic methods
158
Johnston confronts McClellans army all the winter
165
THE MISSISSIPPI CAMPAIGN
169
Island No 10 Albert Sidney Johnston and Beauregard
175
Confederates driven the second day controversial discussions
182
SECTION X
188
50
189
Issues with the President and Stanton
194
Battle of Fair Oaks incessant rains and flood
202
51
208
More volunteers summoned Pope in Virginia
209
Practical disturbance of slavery by war operations
215
Philanthropic drift in 1862 slavetrade treaty with Great Britain
219
Closer relations with the Northern abolitionists
225
SECTION XII
232
McClellans military character considered
240
Union assault at heights of Fredericksburg severe repulse
246
Hallecks errors at the West Buell detached Bragg invades
253
President Lincolns comments abuses of a reopened commerce
260
Policy of President Lincoln French assurances of good faith
267
The slavetrade treaty British philanthropy
272
New policy of 1863 border slave States hesitate to abolish
278
Ample borrowing powers popular investments invited
284
CHAPTER II
290
Bands and battle flags uniform and equipments
298
Military emancipation discussed contrabands attitude
303
GENERAL TRAITS AND INDUSTRIES
316
THE LONG SESSION OF CONGRESS
319
State capital captured Johnston and Pemberton
386
Siege of Vicksburg begun its progress
392
Results of Union triumph Port Hudson other gains
398
Legislation by Congress negro soldiers under fire
404
Difficulties of arrangement a final settlement
410
Virginia and South Carolina the latter leads in rebellion
419
Civil arrests sweeping conscription act Confederate financial
420
Flight of Juarez government crown offered to Maximilian
428
SECTION VII
436
Rosecrans in Tennessee Bragg forced southward Chattanooga
442
Grant summoned to command Rosecrans relieved new supplies
448
Burnside at Knoxville a loyal welcome Longstreets move
455
Long session opened House organizes President offers amnesty
460
UnionRepublican Convention at Baltimore Lincoln renomi
466
Democratic convention at Chicago a peace platform
472
SECTION IX
478
Grants high subordinates preparations to move in concert
486
Night march to Spottsylvania Lee opposes
493
Promotions and more troops new march by the flank
500
The advance against Johnston various battles
508
Hood evacuates Atlanta inportant capture
513
SECTION XI
519
Changes in the Cabinet Blair Bates and Fessenden retire
525
Compassion for the negro a freedmans bureau the franchise
531
Blair visits Richmond conference at Hampton Roads 53
537
Grants dogged purpose Burnsides mine approach of winter
544
Milledgeville reached the seacoast Savannah captured
552
Hood before Nashville Thomass anxious responsibility
558
CHAPTER III
559
SECOND ADMINISTRATION OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN
565
Bitterness of feeling in Southern States
571
Blockaderunning stopped a hazardous commerce
578
Sherman confers at City Point and returns
584
Lee strongly confronted Sheridans fight at Five Forks i
590
The chase to Appomattox a summons to surrender
596
The Confederate government leaves Richmond
604
Davis and Stephens provisional President and VicePresident
605
The last Cabinet meeting reconciling policy proposed
610
Andrew Johnsons accession a sterner policy foreshadowed
616
Great Britain tenders indemnity new treaty negotiated
622
APPENDIX
635
61
640
Copyright

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Page 340 - I have heard, in such a way as to believe it, of your recently saying that both the army and the government needed a dictator. Of course it was not for this, but in spite of it, that I have given you the command. Only those generals who gain successes can set up dictators. What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship.
Page 5 - I shall have the most solemn one to "preserve, protect, and defend it." I am loath to close. We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection. The mystic chords of memory, stretching from every battlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.
Page 469 - American people, that after four years of failure to restore the Union by the experiment of war, during which, under the pretence of a military necessity, or war power higher than the Contitution, the Constitution itself has been disregarded in every part, and public liberty and private right alike trodden down and the material prosperity of the country essentially impaired — justice, humanity, liberty and the public...
Page 561 - With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive to finish the work we are in...
Page 221 - Mr. President, I approve of the proclamation, but I question the expediency of its issue at this juncture. The depression of the public mind, consequent upon our repeated reverses, is so great that I fear the effect of so important a step. It may be viewed as the last measure of an exhausted government, a cry for help ; the government stretching forth its hands to Ethiopia, instead of Ethiopia stretching forth her hands to the government.
Page 8 - William H. Seward, of New York, Secretary of State; Salmon P. Chase, of Ohio, Secretary of the Treasury; Simon Cameron, of Pennsylvania, Secretary of War; Gideon Welles, of Connecticut, Secretary of the Navy; Caleb B. Smith, of Indiana, Secretary of the Interior; Montgomery Blair, of Maryland, Postmaster-General; and Edward Bates, of Missouri, Attorney-General.
Page 209 - I have come to you from the West, where we have always seen the backs of our enemies— from an army whose business it has been to seek the adversary, and to beat him when found, whose policy has been attack and not defence.
Page 38 - In answer to your requisition for troops from Arkansas, to subjugate the Southern States, I have to say that none will be furnished. The demand is only adding insult to injury. The people of this Commonwealth are freemen, not slaves, and will defend to the last extremity, their honor, lives, and property, against Northern mendacity and usurpation.
Page 72 - And this issue embraces more than the fate of these United States. It presents to the whole family of man the question whether a constitutional republic or democracy — a government of the people by the same people — can or cannot maintain its territorial integrity against its own domestic foes.
Page 531 - ... in the same State, and withal so new and unprecedented is the whole case that no exclusive and inflexible plan can safely be prescribed as to details and collaterals. Such exclusive and inflexible plan would surely become a new entanglement. Important principles may and must be inflexible. In the present situation...

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