"Drifting About"; Or, What "Jeems Pipes, of Pipesville," Saw-and-did. An Autobiography by Stephen C. Massett. With Many Comic Illustrations by Mullen

Front Cover
Carleton, 1863 - California - 371 pages
 

Contents

More Funny Scenes
32
Comic Scenes at the Charleston S C Theatre
38
The Old Olympic
48
All about a Calfs Head
53
Yankee Hill
55
Summer Trip up the Mediterranean
58
Malta
63
Smyrna
69
Constantinople
76
XVIIIStreet Scenes
86
At the FootLights in Boston
96
At Home
97
Oh Law
98
I Start for California
103
A Strange Adventure at the Island of Tobogo
107
Arrival at San Francisco
112
XXVIColonel Stevensons Office
114
First Concert given in San Francisco
119
I am made Lord Mayor of N Y of the Pacific
121
The Auction House of Massett and Brewster
126
A Jolly Dinner
132
The First Theatrical Representation in Sacramento
135
The Flood of 1849 and 50
138
GoingGoingGone to the Sandwich Islands
144
The Way they Catch Whales in the Pacific
145
The Island of Lahaina
147
The City of Honolulu S I
151
Arrive again at San Francisco
154
I turn Editor
155
An Editorial Concert
156
The Great FireAn Incident at the Bank
157
Singular Sensations upon revisiting England
159
My First Day in Liverpool
160
All about the City of London
163
The Fielding Mr Thackeray etc
165
Comical Scenes in a Police Court
166
The London Showman
171
Punch and Judy
176
Something about London Boys
179
Kenilworth Castle
180
Warwick Castle
182
StratforduponAvon
184
The Garrick Club
189
The Little Chapel in Cannon Street
190
London to Paris
192
Places in Paris for the Stranger to See
193
Paris Notes
194
The French Actor Lemaitre
197
An Interview with a Corn Doctor
198
The Notre Dame
199
Henri Herz Concert
200
Lyons
202
Nice
203
A Reminiscence of Genoa
204
A Bank Bursts and I lose my Money
240
Some of the Troubles of a Wandering Minstrel
242
Lola Montez
247
The Columbia River
249
Astoria
251
A Running Trip from Portland to Corvallesits Perils
253
The other Land of Gold
259
An Exciting Occurrence at Savage Island in the South Pacific Ocean
260
Melbourne
266
A Christmas Dinner at the French Consuls
270
Rambles through the Colonies
272
How I got to my Hotel
280
On the Wing
281
Concert Saloons
282
My Concert in Bendigo
283
Sydney
290
A Visit to the Lunatic Asylum at Paramatta
294
I meet with an Old Schoolfellow
297
I am Patronized by his Excellency the Governor and Suite
299
Amusing Letter from an Agent Agent
300
Still Moving On
302
Off for India
304
Bombay
306
A Visit to the Caves of Elephanta
308
Blowing Away from the Guns
311
A Word at Parting
320
Calcutta
321
I meet with Captain Hall after an absence of Twenty Years
323
StreetsHotelsetc etc etc
325
Voyage from Calcutta to Suez
326
Aden
327
Suez
328
Shepards British Hotel
329
Egypt
330
Something about the Pyramids
332
About Cotton
334
Alexandria
337
Southampton
340
London once again
341
The Event and what Occurred
342
Mr Shirley Brooks
345
The Derby Day
346
The Garrick Club
347
Charles Dickenss First Reading in London
349
The Shakespeare Dinner at the Garrick Club
350
Hanging at the Old Bailey
351
A Visit to Doctors Commons London and to the Sur rogates Office New York The Contrast
354
The Hon Mrs Norton
357
Leave England for New York
359
Undercliff
361
Washington Irying
362
My First Concert at Niblos
365
First Concert in Boston
366
Off Again to California
367

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Page 29 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Page 273 - With fingers weary and worn. With eyelids heavy and red, A woman sat, in unwomanly rags, Plying her needle and thread — Stitch! stitch! stitch! In poverty, hunger, and dirt, And still with a voice of dolorous pitch, Would that its tone could reach the Rich ! She sang this " Song of the Shirt !
Page 364 - How would it have cheered the spirit of the youthful bard when, wandering forth in disgrace upon a doubtful world, he cast back a heavy look upon his paternal home, could he...
Page 137 - That our good king had summon'd his bold peers To lead their warriors to the Carron side, I left my father's house, and took with me A chosen servant to conduct my steps : Yon trembling coward, who forsook his master.
Page 136 - My name is Norval: on the Grampian hills My father feeds his flocks; a frugal swain, Whose constant cares were to increase his store, And keep his only son, myself, at home. For I had heard of battles, and I longed To follow to the field some warlike lord : And Heaven soon granted what my sire denied.
Page 250 - Take the wings Of morning, pierce the Barcan wilderness, Or lose thyself in the continuous woods Where rolls the Oregon, and hears no sound Save his own dashings —yet the dead are there...
Page 186 - Here he may many a time have sat when a boy, watching the slowly revolving spit with all the longing of an urchin ; or of an evening, listening to the cronies and gossips of Stratford, dealing forth churchyard tales and legendary anecdotes of the troublesome times of England. In this chair, it is the custom of every one that visits the house, to sit ; whether this be done with the hope of imbibing any of the inspiration of the bard, I am at a loss to say...
Page 72 - ... posting forward without requiring either drink or pasture, and is often found six or seven days without any sustenance whatsoever. Its feet are formed for travelling upon sand, and utterly unfit for moist or marshy places ; the inhabitants, therefore, find a most useful assistant in this animal, where no other could subsist, and by its means cross those deserts with safety, which would be unpassable by any other method of conveyance.
Page 358 - She had a low, sweet brow, with fringed lakes Of an unfathom'd darkness couch'd below ; And parted on that brow in jetty flakes The raven hair swept back with wavy flow, Rounding a head of such a shape as makes The old Greek marble with the goddess glow.
Page 321 - Hooghly being the most sublime object in the picture we are contemplating), present, at various seasons of the year, very different aspects, Bengal is always the same. The moisture of its climate, and the nature of the soil, concur in preserving an eternal verdure, which is only to be seen during the season of the rains in the more arid districts. Even in the hottest weather, when the thermometer is up to 130, perhaps for weeks together, and when the sun pours down so fierce a flood of light that...

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