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TABLE I.-Consolidated table of Federal personnel inside and outside the United States employed by the executive agencies during July 1965, and comparison with June 1965, and pay for June 1965, and comparison with May 1965

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TABLE I.-Consolidated table of Federal personnel inside and outside the United States employed by the executive agencies during July 1965, and comparison with June 1965, and pay for June 1965, and comparison with May 1965—Continued

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4 In July 973 employees were transferred to the Department of the Army from the Defense Supply Agency.

5 In July 726 employees were transferred to the Defense Intelligence Agency as follows: 315 from the Department of the Army, 174 from the Department of the Navy, and 237 from the Department of the Air Force.

Agency as follows: 35 from the Department of the Army, 19 from the Department of
the Navy, and 29 from the Department of the Air Force.
Exclusive of personnel and pay of the Central Intelligence Agency and the National
Security Agency.

Includes employment under the President's Youth Opportunity Campaign.
Includes employment in the Job Corps by Federal agencies under the Economic
Opportunity Act of 1965 (Public Law 88-452), as follows:

Agency

Agriculture Department
Interior Department...

Total..

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938

807

+131

2, 191

1,767

+424

6 New organizational entity established pursuant to Department of Defense directive 5105.36, June 9, 1965, issued by the Secretary of Defense under authority of sec. 3(a) of the Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-599). In July 83 employees and their functions were transferred to the Defense Contract Audit TABLE II.—Federal personnel inside the United States employed by the executive agencies during July 1965, and comparison with June 1965

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TABLE II.-Federal personnel inside the United States employed by the executive agencies during July 1965, and comparison with June 1965-Continued

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1 July figure includes 3,341 employees of the Agency for International Development as compared with 3,270 in June.

2 July figure includes 829 employees of the Peace Corps as compared with 715 in June. 3 In July, 973 employees were transferred from the Department of the Army to the Defense Supply Agency.

4 New organizational entity established pursuant to Department of Defense directive 5105.36, June 9, 1965, issued by the Secretary of Defense under authority of sec. 3(a) of the Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1958 (Public Law 85-599). In July, 83 employees and their functions were transferred to the Defense Contract Audit Agency as follows: 35 from the Department of the Army, 19 from the Department of the Navy, and 29 from the Department of the Air Force.

TABLE III.-Federal personnel outside the United States employed by the executive agencies during July 1965, and comparison with

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TABLE IV.-Industrial employees of the Federal Government inside and outside the United States employed by the executive agencies during July 1965, and comparison with June 1965

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TABLE V.-Foreign nationals working under U.S. agencies overseas, excluded from tables I through IV of this report, whose services are provided by contractual agreement between the United States and foreign governments, or because of the nature of their work or the source of funds from which they are paid, as of July 1965, and comparison with June 1965

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STATEMENT BY SENATOR BYRD OF VIRGINIA THE MONTH OF JULY 1965

Civilian employees

Executive agencies of the Federal Government reported civilian employment in the month of July totaling 2,542,590, compared with 2,508,119 in June. This was a net increase of 34,471.

This was the largest monthly increase in Federal civilian employment since June of 1962. Employment in July reached its highest point since June 1953.

Employment by civilian agencies for the month of July was 1,497,003, an increase of 22,680 as compared with the June total of 1,474,323. Total civilian employment in the military agencies in July was 1,045,587, an increase of 11,791 as compared with 1,033,796 in June.

Civilian agencies reporting the larger increases were Post Office Department with 10,209, Agriculture Department with 4,454, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare with 2,995, Treasury Department with 2,119 and National Aeronautics and Space Administration was 1,161.

In the Department of Defense the largest increases in civilian employment were reported by the Air Force with 4,319, Army with 4,199 and Navy with 3,361.

Total employment inside the United States in July was 2,386,976, an increase of 33,172 as compared with June. Total employment outside the United States in July was 155,614, an increase of 1,299 as compared with June. Industrial employment by Federal agencies in July totaled 558,437, an increase of 12,369.

These figures are from reports certified by the agencies as compiled by the Joint Committee on Reduction of Nonessential Federal Expenditures.

Foreign nationals

The total of 2,542,590 civilian employees certified to the committee by executive agencies in their regular monthly personnel reports includes some foreign nationals employed in U.S. Government activities abroad, but in addition to these there were 130,119 foreign nationals working for U.S. agencies overseas during July who were not counted in the usual personnel reports. The number in June was 130,451.

SUMMARY OF FEDERAL CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT COSTS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1965 (ENDED JUNE 30, 1965)

For the past 9 years the committee, in its statement accompanying the monthly civilian payroll cost for June (the last month in the fiscal year) has compared the annual cost with the totals for previous years. The following comparison continues this practice.

The cost of civilian employment in the executive branch of the Federal Government in fiscal year 1965, ended June 30, totaled $17,242 million. This was $1,037 million

BILLS INTRODUCED

time, and, by unanimous consent, the

Bills were introduced, read the first

second time, and referred as follows:

By Mr. SYMINGTON (for himself and
Mr. LONG of Missouri):

S. 2483. A bill to amend the General Bridge Act of 1946 for the purpose of maintaining existing bridge clearances on navigable rivers and waterways connecting with the sea; to the Committee on Public Works. (See the remarks of Mr. SYMINGTON When he introduced the above bill, which appear under a separate heading.)

By Mr. DODD:

S. 2484. A bill to amend title V of the International Claims Settlement Act of 1949 to provide for the determination of the 30, 357 amounts of claims of nationals of the United States against the Chinese Communist regime; to the Committee on Foreign Relations. (See the remarks of Mr. DODD when he introduced the above bill, which appear under a separate heading.)

higher than the preceding fiscal year 1964; and it was an all-time high. The 1965 payroll costs rose, while average employment for the full 12 months of the fiscal year decreased 8,876, compared with average employment in 1964.

The 1965 civilian agency payrolls totaled $10,137 million as compared with $9,387 million the year before; and payroll costs for civilian employment of the military agencies totaled $7,105 million as compared with $6,818 million in fiscal year 1964.

Figures by fiscal years since 1954 follow: Annual Federal expenditures for civilian payroll, executive branch-Fiscal years 1954-65 [In millions of dollars]

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By Mr. BAYH:

S. 2485. A bill to amend the Merchant Marine Act, 1920, to prohibit transportation of articles to or from the United States aboard certain foreign vessels, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Commerce.

(See the remarks of Mr. BAYH when he introduced the above bill, which appear under a separate heading.)

By Mr. MONDALE:

S. 2486. A bill for the relief of Dr. Earl C. Chamberlayne; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. HARRIS:

S. 2487. A bill for the relief of Eleutheria Tsakalakis; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

By Mr. DOMINICK:

S. 2488. A bill for the relief of Santiago Ochoa Garcia; to the Committee on the Judiciary.

CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

TO EXPRESS SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATIVE TO CERTAIN WATER PROBLEMS CONFRONTING THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA

Mr. MOSS submitted a concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 55) to express sense of Congress relative to certain water problems confronting the United States and Canada, which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

(See the above concurrent resolution printed in full when submitted by Mr. Moss, which appears under a separate heading.)

AMENDMENT TO GENERAL BRIDGE ACT OF 1946

Mr. SYMINGTON. Mr. President, the program for the river development of the Nation continues to advance at a rapid pace. We are controlling the depth and improving the navigable channels of our inland waterways to meet the demand for waterborne commerce.

Water transportation is encouraging industrial growth along our inland waterway system. Freight tonnage is setting new records annually.

In the light of these demands upon the capabilities of our rivers-especially the necessary movement of large structures we should maintain presently available bridge clearances so that our navigable waters will be kept open.

To meet this need, therefore, on behalf of my colleague from Missouri [Mr. LONG] and myself, I introduce, for appropriate reference, a bill to amend the General Bridge Act of 1946.

Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that an editorial on this subject, published in the St. Louis Post Dispatch of August 17, 1965, be printed at this point in the RECORD.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The bill will be received and appropriately referred; and, without objection, the editorial will be printed in the RECORD.

The bill (S. 2483) to amend the General Bridge Act of 1946 for the purpose of maintaining existing bridge clearances on navigable rivers and waterways connecting with the sea, introduced by Mr. SYMINGTON (for himself and Mr. LONG of Missouri), was received, read twice by its title, and referred to the Committee on Public Works.

The editorial presented by Mr. SYMINGTON is as follows:

[From the St. Louis (Mo.) Post-Dispatch, Aug. 17, 1965]

BRIDGES, NOT BARRIERS The war over bridge clearances on the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers has been going on for more than 8 years now and still it is being fought to a conclusion on a span-byspan basis. Currently under debate are one structure at Omaha which is being built and another at Kansas City for which a permit has been issued. Both would still further reduce the minimum clearances of 52 feet vertical and 400 feet horizontal in existence on bridges now in use.

As the Waterways Journal of St. Louis declares editorially, this procedure "not only is a needless expense for waterway interests, but there is always the danger that some proposals will not be discovered until it is too late." The result could be to foreclose the waterways to some types of important freight as has already been done on the highways and the railroads by inadequate clearances. Minimum clearances on these two principal rivers should not be further reduced unless for more compelling reasons than have yet been raised. The country must not sell its future short on the last transportation artery capable of carrying giant freight.

TO EXPAND THE JURISDICTION OF THE FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION TO INCLUDE THE CLAIMS OF U.S. CITIZENS AGAINST COMMUNIST CHINA

Mr. DODD. Mr. President, in 1954 Congress established the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission to adjudicate claims by U.S. citizens against foreign countries which have seized their property.

During the past 15 years, the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission and its predecessors have made awards to claimants from funds available as part of settlements with the United States by Yugoslavia, Poland, Rumania, and Bulgaria.

In other cases, where no settlement on claims has been reached between the United States and the expropriating nation, Congress has empowered the Commission to determine the validity and amount of U.S. citizens' claims against the expropriating country anyway, but payment of the claims has been made only from assets of the foreign govern

ment in the ment in the

States.

possession of the United and implications

Where there have been no such assets, no payment has been made at all.

In this latter class of cases, in which no assets exist from which payment can be made, the Commission nonetheless determines the merits and the amounts of the claims in order to decide and record the facts of each case and in order to provide the Secretary of State with an intelligent basis upon which to with an intelligent basis upon which to negotiate with the expropriating power, should it be determined prudent to do so.

Last year Congress expanded the jurisdiction of the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission to include determination of the amount and the validity of claims by U.S. citizens against the Government of Cuba which have arisen as a result of the Castro Government's bad credit, expropriation, and lawlessness against U.S. citizens.

and implications of the situation in which we are engaged in Vietnam.

The United States of America-this Nation's soldiers, sailors, and airmenare fighting and dying in Vietnam to protect the free world from further Communist encroachment upon freedom and liberty.

Yet a number of ships of free world nations continue to carry supplies to North Vietnam. It may well be that supplies carried to North Vietnam by free world vessels are predominantly nonstrategic in nature. It may be that any loss of supplies from free world ships to North Vietnam could be replaced by Communist bloc vessels.

But I maintain, Mr. President, that any supplies of any kind to a nation making war on its neighbor contribute directly to the war effort and could result in the death of American and allied fighting men. I contend further, Mr. President, that the burden of furnishing such supplies to an aggressor nation should fall upon those in sympathy with the aggressor. No freedom-loving naI think the Cuban Claims Act was a tion should seek to profit from trade Wise piece of legislation.

That legislation specifically provided that it could not be construed as authorizing an appropriation for the purpose of paying these Cuban claims.

But I think the jurisdiction of the Foreign Claims Claims Settlement Commission should also be extended to include claims of U.S. citizens against the Chinese Communist Government for expropriation, unpaid debts, and other unlawful injuries. Therefore, I introduce, for appropriate reference, a bill to authorize the Foreign Claims Commission to hear, decide, and record these claims against the day when Communist China can be Communist China can be brought to the bar of international law and justice.

The bill I propose in no way changes the provisions of the Cuban Claims Act passed last year, except to allow the Commission to adjudicate claims of U.S. citizens against Communist China on the same basis as claims against Cuba.

This bill, like the Cuban Claims Act, will not involve or authorize any appropriation of funds to pay these claims.

But it will provide some remedy for those of our citizens who have been vic

timized by the outlawry of Communist China.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The bill will be received and appropriately referred.

The bill (S. 2484) to amend title V of the International Claims Settlement Act of 1949 to provide for the determination of 1949 to provide for the determination of the amounts of claims of nationals of of the amounts of claims of nationals of the United States against the Chinese Communist regime, introduced by Mr. DODD, was received, read twice by its title, and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

SANCTIONS AGAINST SHIPPING COMPANIES TRADING WITH NORTH VIETNAM

Mr. BAYH. Mr. President, I introduce, for appropriate reference, a bill designed to discourage and bring sancagainst tions shipping companies throughout the free world which persist in trading with North Vietnam.

It is high time, Mr. President, that such companies realize the full extent

which could result in the death of boys seeking to defend freedom.

In the 18-month period between January 1964 through June 1965 ships from the free world have carried 476 cargoes to North Vietnam. In the first half of this year, ships from six free world nations have visited North Vietnamese ports a total of 75 times. The six nations represented in this trade are the United Kingdom-which accounted for about 60 percent of this traffic-Japan, Greece, Norway, the Netherlands, and Lebanon.

Ironically, 24 of the very same vessels which have hauled cargoes to North Vietnam have put in to American ports no fewer than 75 times in the 18 months between January 1964 through June 1965.

It seems inconceivable to me that the United States should open its ports to vessels which may have earlier carried cargoes to North Vietnam or may be heading to North Vietnamese ports soon after putting in at American harbors.

It seems to me, Mr. President, that this Nation should not only prohibit those individual ships from utilizing American ports, but should similarly penalize any vessel owned by a private shipping interest which permits any ship under its control to carry cargoes to or from North Vietnam.

The bill I am introducing today would do just that. From the time it becomes law, the proposal would prohibit the use of American ports to the ships of any private interest which allowed any of its vessels to traffic with the North Vietnamese.

This, it seems to me, is the very least this Nation could do to punish those who continue to seek profits at the possible cost of spilling American blood on Vietnamese soil.

The VICE PRESIDENT. The bill will be received and appropriately referred.

The bill (S. 2485) to amend the Merchant Marine Act, 1920, to prohibit transportation of articles to or from the

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