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HARVARD
UNIVERSITY
LIBRARY

DEC 15 1961

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1865, by

BRADLEY & CO.,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, in and for the

Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

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This work will be beautifully illustrated with groups of the following Naval and Military Heroes, distinguished civilians, prominent Rebels, military and civil; and will contain elegant full-page portraits of President Lincoln and Lieutenant-General Grant, besides numerous fine steel engravings of battle-scenes, etc.

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17 LIEUTENANT-GENERAL SCOTT.

18. GENERAL MCCLELLAN.

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HALLECK.
CASEY.

DIX.

BUELL

SYKES.

SHIELDS.

FRANKLIN.

GILLMORE.

TERRY.

BURNSIDE.

HOOKER.

BUTLER.

BANKS.

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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

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HANCOCK.

WARREN

WRIGHT.

"BALDY" SMITH

SICKLES.

HEINTZELMAN.

SHERMAN.
ROSECRANS.

PORTRAITS.

LOGAN.
HOWARD.

SLOCUM.

ROBERT McCOOK.

MCCLERNAND.

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32. GENERAL SIGEL.
FREMONT.
ORD.
HUNTER.
SHERIDAN.
KILPATRICK.

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63. GENERAL MITCHELL.

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72. VICE ADMIRAL FARRAGUT.

73. REAR "

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78. COMMODORE WINSLOW.

79. LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER CUSHING.

80. GENERAL R. E. LEE.

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RENO. GRIERSON. ROUSSEAU. WILSON.

KAUTZ.

STONEMAN.

PLEASONTON.

GREGG.

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86. GENERAL A. P. HILL.
FITZHUGH LEE.

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88. COLONEL MOSEBY.

89. GENERAL JOSEPH E. JOHNSTON.

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HOOD.
BRAGG.

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PORTER.

FOOTE.

DU PONT.

DAHLGREN.

GOLDSBOROUGH.

"STONEWALL" JACKSON.

EWELL.

BEAUREGARD.

LONGSTREET. BRECKINRIDGE.

BATTLE

108. BOMBARDMENT OF FORT SUMTER

109. DEATH OF GENERAL LYON. 110. THE "CARONDELET" RUNNING THE GAUNTLET AT ISLAND NO. 10.

111. BOMBARDMENT OF FORT JACKSON.

112 DEMAND FOR THE SURRENDER OF NEW ORLEANS.

113. THE STORMING OF FORT DONELSON.

114. SIEGE OF YORKTOWN.

115. LOSS OF THE MONITOR.

116. BATTLE OF ANTIETAM.

117. BURNING OF UNITED STATES MERCHANTMEN BY REBEL PIRATES.

118. THE ATTACK ON FREDERICKSBURG.

119. ATTACK OF THE REBELS ON UNITED STATES GUNBOATS IN GALVESTON HARBOR.

120. VIEW OF THE UNION VOLUNTEER REFRESHMENT SALOON AT PHILADELPHIA, PA. 12. ATTACK ON THE SIXTH MASSACHUSETTS

REGIMENT IN BALTIMORE.

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92. LIEUTENANT-GENERAL KIRBY SMITH.

93. MAJOR-GENERAL PRICE.

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A. S. JOHNSON.

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SCENES, ETC.

HARDEE. FORREST.

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It will also be illustrated with twenty-four maps, and diagrams of battle scenes.

PREFACE.

No event has occurred on the American continent since the glorious Revolution of 1776, equal in magnitude and interest to the contest which has taken place between opposite and hostile portions of the Federal Union; and which all true patriots stigmatize by the unequivocal and significant epithet of the Southern Rebellion. So important was this struggle, that it not only enlisted the most vigorous energies of the National Government, and summoned its armies into the field, but it became the paramount topic in every mind. All classes and professions regarded it with intense interest, and watched the progress of events with profound anxiety. For this purpose, scholars suspended their studies in recondite and learned subjects of inquiry; synods and general assemblies discussed the issues involved with solemn earnestness; the ordinary pursuits of the community seemed in a great measure to be modified and controlled by the novel and startling aspect of the times. This universally prevalent feeling was amply justified by the immense interests and the vital principles which were to be disposed of by the conflict. Nor is it singular that the war should ultimately engage the attention of mankind in all civilized countries, and that it should be regarded as the event of chief importance then transpiring on the globe.

There can be little doubt that a reliable history of the incidents con:nected with this memorable drama, and even more than one such history, would be acceptable to the public. In the following work, therefore, the writer has undertaken to describe its thrilling and marvellous scenes. He has set forth, at some length, the most potent of the causes which gave it birth. He has introduced, from time to time, biographical sketches of those soldiers and statesmen who distinguished themselves by their heroism, or by their patriotism, during its progress. He has followed the march of the Federal armies, as they achieved one victory, or suffered one temporary reverse after another; and the narrative will be continued, Deo volente, until the record is complete, and he has described how the Republic was conducted, by firm and skilful hands, through all the storms which have assailed it, to the attainment of a permanent and honorable peace.

The general rule, according to which the following work has been written, was to describe events with more or less minuteness of detail, according to the proportion of their historical importance. Many incidents

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necessarily happen in such a struggle-spreading, as it does, over so vast an area-which may possess an intense, though momentary interest, and greatly excite the public mind at the period of their occurrence, which are, nevertheless, insignificant in their essential nature, and trivial in their ultimate consequences. As it was the design of the present writer to prepare a history of the war within a convenient and moderate compass, it became necessary to omit all, or, at least, any extended allusion to such events, so that the necessary space might remain in which to dwell, with appropriate fulness, upon the really decisive incidents of the contest. For the same reason, no reference is made, in the biographical sketches which are introduced, to those ephemeral and factitious reputations, which were created from time to time; which, going up suddenly, and glaring portentously, like rockets, descended again as quickly, and relapsed into their legitimate oblivion. An effort has thus been made throughout the work to do justice to those events and persons to whom a genuine and permanent immortality appertains; at the same time to realize and exemplify the excellent maxim, Parva sed apta, not voluminous, but condensed and comprehensive.

The author has been assiduous and careful in regard to the materials from which the contents of the work have been derived. He has applied to his use every attainable source of information which was worthy of confidence and attention. Official reports of eminent commanders, and the narratives of intelligent and truthful eye-witnesses of the scenes described, together with various other depositories of facts, have been thoroughly examined, compared, and appropriated. The author has not the presumption to imagine that he has in all cases attained perfect accuracy; but he does not hesitate to assert, that he has left no effort or expedient unemployed to avoid error and misstatement in every part of the work. An historical narrative of events of recent date labors under some disadvantages, while, at the same time, it may possess facilities and merits of which the record of more remote and unfamiliar transactions will be destitute. It has been affirmed that a correct history of a war like that against Secession could not be written until after the lapse of many years. We believe this statement to be erroneous. If the writer be impartial, laborious, and possessed of the necessary literary skill, he will have all the qualities essential to the elaboration of a satisfactory history of such a series of events; and these qualities he may possess immediately after their occurrence, as well as at a more distant period. At the same time, he will enjoy a superior advantage in the vividness and strength of the impression which the events have made, both upon his own mind, and upon the minds of those whose productions he consults in the preparation of his work.

S. M. S.

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