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DISGRACEFUL CONDUCT.

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sion was heard in the fort, and half an hour afterward, a white flag was seen to emerge from it. General Page, the Commander, offered to surrender the fort, and asked the terms of capitulation.

Unconditional surrender at two o'clock that day, was the reply, which the rebel General was forced to accept.

In his indignation and mortification, however, he determined to lessen as much as possible the value of the victory. for after the surrender, Farragut says, “It was discovered, on an examination of tho interior, that most of the guns were spiked, and many of the gun-carriages wantonly injured, and arms, ammunition, provisions, &c., destroyed; and that there was every reason to believe that this had been done after the white flag had been raised. It was also discovered that General Page, and several of his officers, had no swords to deliver up, and further, that some of those which were surrendered, had been broken."

He contrasts this conduct with that of Colonel Anderson, of Fort Gaines, who “from the moment he raised the white flag, scrupulously kept every thing intact, and in that condition delivered it over; whilst General Page and his officers, with a childish spitefulness, destroyed the guns which they said they would defend to the last, but which they never defended at all, or threw away, or broke those weapons which they had not the manliness to use against their enemies; for Fort Morgan never fired a gun after the commencement of the bombardment, and the advanced pickets were repeatedly on the glacis.”

There never was a more striking illustration of the ease with which a mean and dishonorable Commander may increase his disgrace, by the attempt to lessen it, than this. These few sarcastic words of Farragut, who knew how to admire a brave and honorable foe, will stick to General Page as long as the history of the country endures

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CAPTURE OF THE GEORGIA,

Though the outer defenses of Mobile were now all taken, the city was as far as ever from falling into our hands. The water was too shallow to allow the approach of our vessels to within shelling distance, and though Farragut used every device to reach the place, it soon became evident that it could be taken only by a land force.

In the latter part of this month, the Niagara captured off the coast of Europe, the Japan, or Georgia, a noted rebel privateer, though at the time of her seizure, she was sailing under English colors, and chartered to the Portuguese Gov. ernment.

CHAPTER XXXIV.

AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 1864

GRANT'S CEASELESS ACTIVITY-BLOWING UP OF AN ORDNANCE BOAT-DUTCI

GAP CANAL-WARREN'S FIGHT FOR THE WELDON RAILROAD-BATTLE AT REAM'S STATION-DEFEAT OF HANCOCK's corps-IEADE'S DISPATCHES SIIERIDAN'S OPERATIONS IN THE SHENANDOAH VALLEY--PURSUIT OF EARLY—

CAPTURE OF OUR TRAINS BY MOSBY-RETREAT OF SHERIDAN-HIS POSITION

AT BOLIVAR HEIGHTS-A SECOND ADVASCE--TAKES POSITION AT BERRYS

IN.

VILLE-UNSATISFACTORY CAMPAIGN--DISAPPOINTMENT OF THE COUNTRYGRANT'S EXPLANATION OF THE WHOLE MATTER-TIE PERMISSION TO

GO - SHERIDAN XOVES IN EARNEST-BATTLES OF OPEQUAN CREEK AND FISHER'S HILL-TOTAL ROUT OF THE ENEMY-EARLY TAKES A NEW POSITION AT BROWN'S GAP-SHERIDAN FALLS BACK.

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MHE month of August, which gave such laurels to the

navy under Farragut, at Mobile, and saw Sherman's gallant army virtually in possession of Atlanta, witnessed no triumphs of the Army of the Potomac. It brought instead what seemed to be the heritage of this sadly tried, but noble army-terrible fighting, heavy losses, but no success. Grant, though apparently at a dead-lock with the enemy in front of Petersburg, did not sit down in idleness. He kept the heavens, around Lee, constantly muttering thunder-notes of alarm, and almost every day the bolt threatened to fall in one direction or another. Indefatigable, untiring, and exhaustless in resources, no sooner did one thing or measure fail, than he tried another. He was the most unsleeping, merciless antagonist that an enemy ever had to deal with, and Lee soon discovered that he never could calculate on a

At the very time when he thought his enemy exhausted, and would naturally seek rest, the greatest energy would be put forth.

moment's repose.

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DUTCH GAP CANAL.

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The rebels, taught wisdom by the mine that destroyed one of their forts, began to countermine, and on the 5th, sprung a mine in front of the Eighteenth Corps, where they supposed we were running one of our own, but it produced no effect. One of our own ordnance boats, however, blew up five days after, at City Point, killing and wounding two hundred men.

Butler now commenced the famous Dutch Gap canal, which, like the one he dug around Vicksburg, was expected to work wonders. The James River, just below Fort Darling, makes an immense bend, inclosing a peninsula, called Farrar Island, the neck of which, where it joins the mainland, is only a half a mile across, while it is six miles around it by the stream. It was prosecuted under the constant fire of the enemy, but, like the Vicksburg canal, was useless labor.

At this time, Grant says, “reports from various sources led me to believe that the enemy had detached three divisions from Petersburg to reinforce Early in the Shenandoah Valley. I therefore sent the Second Corps, and Gregg's division of cavalry, of the Army of the Potomac, and a force of General Butler's army, on the night of the 13th of August, to threaten Richmond from the north side of the James, to prevent him from sending troops away, and, if possible, to draw back those sent. . In this move we captured six pieces of artillery and several hundred prisoners, detained troops that were under marching orders, and ascertained that but one disvision, (Kershaw's,) of the three reputed detached, had gone.

“The enemy having withdrawn heavily from Petersburg to resist this movement, the Fifth Corps, General Warren commanding, was moved out on the 18th, and took possession of the Weldon railroad.”

Here he was attacked furiously, the next day, by Hill,

ATTACK ON HANCOCK.

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with two divisions, and a portion of our army was overwhelmed; and for a time, a second disaster at this point, seemed inevitable. But the gallant Fifth Corps succeeded in rallying, and, by a desperate charge, retrieved its ground, driving the rebels in confusion, and capturing many prisoners. Night, at length, closed the conflict. Our loss, this day, was between three and four thousand—that of the enemy, in killed and wounded, probably about the same as ours, though he took many more prisoners than we.

A few days after, the rebels again attacked Warren's position, but this time they were handsomely repulsed, with heavy loss-Generals Saunders and Lamar being among the killed. Warren now pushed his lines toward Petersburg, while the Second Corps, which had in the neantime arrived. began to tear up the railroad in rear of him.

At Ream's Station, this gallant Corps of Hancock, on the 25th, sufered a severe repulse. The rebels, under Hill, at about half-past three in the afternoon, suddenly emerged from the woods, in front of Miles and Gibbon, and with fixed bayonets and loud cheers, swept swiftly over the intervening space. Four batteries at once concentrated their fire on the column, and shot and shell and canister tore through it with awful destruction. Yet, through it, and through the steady fire of musketry, that swept without cessation the close formations, they kept on till within twenty paces of our line, when, unable to breast the fiery sleet ariy longer, they recoiled. Uudismayed, they not long after repeated the desperate charge, but with similar results. They then brouglit up their batteries, and played furiously on our lines for nearly a half an hour, when the firing suddenly ceased, and with loud yells, and without firing a shot, they again sprang forward-crossed the interval that separated them from our lines, reached the breastworks, mounted

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