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Troy, Kas., speech in, I, 585 et seq.

Party, I, 78 ; defeats national-bank met
Troy, N. Y., address at, Feb. 19, 1861, I, sures, 78; friends support Gen. Tapio
685.

122; elected Vice-President, 220; succes
Truckee River, Nev., Pacific railroad at, II, to Presidency, 220, 222,
611.

Tyler County, Va., excepted from insulti-
Truesdale, Calvin, to examine charges tion proclamation, II, 195.

against T. J. Pickett, II, 326.
Truett, Myers, I, 40.

Ullman, Col. Daniel, desires to organis
Trumbull, Senator Lyman, I, 241, 251, 265, blacks in Mississippi and Louisiana, II,

317, 322, 403, 656, 668; elected U. 8. senator, 293; to raise a colored brigade, 318, 318.
214, 340, 401, 402; one of the founders of Ulster County, N., Y., William Martin por
the Republican Party, 279; candidate for posed as collector in, II, 237.
Douglas's senatorial seat, 279, 282; com- Unconditional Union men, proposed meet
mented on by Douglas, 281, 282; alleged ing of, at Springfield, II., II, 39.
deal with Lincoln, 286, 287, 348, 364, 401, 461; Underwood, Judge John C., case of Mrs
position on admission of States, 314, 315; Keenan referred to, II, 611.
attempts to dissolve the Democratic Underwood, J. R., draft of letter to, m
Party, 323; alleged bargain for Douglas's specting assessments in Kentucky, II,
senatorship, 324; alleged cheating of Lin- 590, 591.
coln in senatorial election, 324; leader in Union, the secret of strength, 1, 17: frater
Abolition movement, 336, 400;. opposes nity the element of, II, 11. See also FD
Douglas in discussion, 338, speaks at Wa- ERAL UNION.
terloo, 338, 404; elected by Abolition votes, Union County, Ky., matter of refundit,
339; how elected to U. 8. Senate, 340; in- money collected in, II, 308.
terrogates Douglas as to power of Terri- Union Democrats welcome Clay, I, 516.
tory to exclude slavery prior to formation Union League, Philadelphia, the Presideri
of constitution, 357; speaks at Chicago elected honorary member of, II, 199.
and Alton against Douglas, 370, 371, 388; Union National Convention of 1864, plans
indorsed by Lincoln, 370 et seq., 396, 408- for a radical platform, II, 528; contested
410, 520; charges Douglas with participa- seats in, from Missouri, 528; the President's
tion in plot to form constitution for Kan- non-interference with, 628; Lincoln's it
Bas, 371* et seq.; extract from speech at nomination conceded by the radical,
Alton referred to by Lincoln in opening question of the Vice-Presidency in,
speech at Charleston, 379-385; charges renominates Lincoln for President,
against Douglas, 385 et seq.; stumps Illi- 531; platform of, 529-531; indorseas L
nois against Douglas, 401 ; Matheny's at- coln's policy, 530; communication of the
tack on, 402; charged by Douglas with nomination to the President, 538; reme
bringing false charges against him, 403 ; brance of the army and navy by, I
Lincoln's comments on story of bargain Union Pacific Railroad, the President's in
between himself and, 408, 409; charges terest in, II, 441; message to the Senate
Douglas with preventing people of Kan- concerning the line of, 493.
sas from voting on constitution, 411; Union sentiment, in the South, II, 11, 18
speaks in behalf of Lincoln in Monroe Seward looks for revival of, 13; in Mary
County, 433, 438; attempted fraud upon, land, 103.
by Douglas, 444; charged by Douglas with Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloons, I.
forgery, 460, 461; Douglas's attempt to use 534.
Springfield resolutions against, 484; vote Union Whigs welcome Clay, I, 515.
of Judd for, 594, 595 ; on political situation Unitarian Church, slavery dissension ie 1
in 1860, 633; letter to, 661; induces revoca- 507.
tion of order suspending the Chicago “United Colonies," the, II, 62.
Times,” II, 525; letter to, respecting re- United

oned as property, 613, 618; proport
slaves in population, 613, 618, 630;
of Constitution not to show trace o
tence of slavery in, 624; desirabil
peace in, 628; normal condition of
ritory of, 636; strength of our po
fabric, 636;

perpetuity of the Uni
3; acts of violence against author
insurrectionary or revolutionary,
tility to, how to be inet, 4; Deeds
eign arbitrament, 37; attitude rege
European nations, 49; war revolt
the sentiments of the people
possibility of war between Eur
nations and, 51; the authority of
amount, 53; proficiency in indu
arts, 67; claims against, 99; a peopl
ous of their rights, 108; populatio
tistics of, compared with those of Eu
273; area, 273; ratio of increase on
ulation by decades, 273; address
distressed operatives of Blackburn,
to the people of, 312; the birthda
366; rights of citizens of, abroad

47; consula

States, advantages of, 1, 9; dangos
construction of Arkansas, 535; letter to, threatening, 9-15; importance of matt

respecting affairs in Louisiana, 625, 626. factures to, 73; evil influence of slavery
Trust, the Presidential office a public, II, 66. in, as a republican example to the worth
Tuck, -, suggested for Cabinet position, 186; home rule principles at inert
I, 661.

tion of, 196; population of, 258 ; toti
Tucker County, Va., excepted from insur- strength, and progress of. 258, Bali, se
rection proclamation, II, 195.

406, 479; two great political parties in
Turkey, relations with, II, 263; commercial prior to 1854, 278, 398; likened to a bire

treaty with, 263 ; U. 8. consular courts in, of bees, 318; separate States stand on 11
305; consular service in, 447.

equality, 428; varying status of nesto i
Turner, Maj. Levi C., judge-advocate of different states, 435 ; State rights the fish

court-martial trying Major Key, II, 241; damental principle of the government of
testimony concerning Major Key's con-

436; power of acquiring additional ter
duct, 241.

ritory, 449; slavery a disturbing and
Turner, T.J., I, 213; opposed to slavery ex- dangerous element in, 462, 606, 607; right:

tension, 211; elected speaker of Ilinois of several states, under U. 8. Constito
House of Representatives, 212, 323; drafts tion, in regard to slavery, 479;

intuier
resolutions at Rockford Convention, 323 ; tion, 479; veto power of the President
voted for Lincoln for senator, 326.

492; prohibition of slavery in new ter
Tuscumbia, Ala., Halleck at, II, 206.

tory, 504; basis of representation in, under
Twenty-fourth Corps, success of, II, 667. the Constitution, 504; Lincoln denies de
Twiggs, Gen. David E., note regarding his sire to set up conflict between the seren

successor, I, 695; disposition of swords 505; variation of domestic institutions to
belonging to, II, 280.

the several, 605, 606; parties not strong
Tybee Island, Ga., Federal possession of, enough to disturb general peace of the
II, 104.

country, 507; commerce, 69; slavery
Tyler, Gen. E. B., movements near Vienna, prohibited in the several states, 540; iB
Va., II, 66; surrounded at Martinsburg, Huence of public opinion in, 57,
352

people supreme over Congresses and
Tyler, Pres. John, effect of policy on Whig

courts, 575, 593; value of slaves in, rectie

mineral resources
tem of, 447 ; should pursue liberal
in regard to international commerce
mineral lands of the, 452; a severe te
the republic, 595; financial affairs.
GOD; President of, see PRESIDENT OF
UNITED STATES. See also POPULAT
STATES, and the names of the seu

States,
United States Army, to be increased,
3, 181, II, 41, 42; Maj. Anderson orde
to raise troops for, 13; defection of
cers of, 55; calls for additions to, 59;
ignations in, confined to the officers,
que

to generalship, ?1; strength of
Babbath observance in the, 254; po
sions for payment of, 300, 301, 448; tem
ance and drunkenness in, 416,416; trib
to, 456, 587; punishment of withhol
payment, 491; Gen. Grant commissie
lieutenant-general in, 483, 494 ; no los
by ernabeipation, 509; thanked by

Union National Convention, 630, 538;
hibition against trading with the en

581.
United States Bank, the subject discus

1, 21-31; constitutionality of, 229, 270;
gressional action on, 229; re-charter
255, 256; Douglas's position on, 271;
Cineinnati platform on, 299; Jacks
course in regard to, 299. Bee also B.

OF UNITED STATES
United States bonds, and the national ba
ing system, II, 264, 265, 301 ; proposert
sue of, for compensation for libera
slaves,

270, 271.
United States census, partizanship in
pointing deputies for that of 1840, L,
khett's objection to, 130; the seventh,

106.
United States Christian Commission, met

ing at Washington, II, 311.
United States Circuit Court of Californi
resolution of House of Representative

regarding, II, 178, 179.
United States circuit courts, uniform di

125.

tribution of, II, 98; proposed abolitic
United States commerce, protection of,
United States Congress, powers of, to con

trol slavery, 1, 15, 273, 280, 642: powers, at
titnde, and actions of, respecting creation
of a national bank, 30, 19, 20, 299, 455
organization of. Dec. 6, 1847, 46; position
on the Mexican question, 100, 101, 104; po-

oned as property, 613, 618; proportion of
slaves in population, 613, 618, 630; intent
of Constitution not to show trace of exis-
tence of slavery in, 624; desirability of
peace in, 628; normal condition of all ter-
ritory of, 636; strength of our political
fabrio, 636; perpetuity of the Union, II,
3; acts of violence against authority of,
insurrectionary or revolutionary, 3; hos-
tility to, how to be met, 4; needs no for-
eign arbitrament, 37; attitude regarding
European nations, 49; war revolting to
the sentiments of the people of, 51;
possibility of war between European
nations and, 51; the authority of, par-
amount, 53; proficiency in industrial
arts, 67, claims against, 99; a people jeal-
ous of their rights, 108; population sta-
tistics of, compared with those of Europe,
273; area, 273; ratio of increase of pop-
ulation by decades, 273; address of the
distressed operatives of Blackburn, Eng.,
to the people of, 312; the birthday of,
366; rights of citizens of, abroad, 446;
mineral resources of, 447; consular sys-
tem of, 447 ; should pursue liberal policy
in regard to international commerce, 448;
mineral lands of the, 452; a severe test of
the republic, 595; financial affairs, 607-
609; President of, see PRESIDENT OF THE
UNITED STATES. See also POPULATION;
STATES, and the names of the several

States.
United States Army, to be increased, May

3, 1861, II, 41, 42; Maj. Anderson ordered
to raise troops for, 43; defection of offi-
cers of, 55; calls for additions to, 59; res-
ignations in, contined to the officers, 64;
question of appointment of James H.
Lane to generalship, 71; strength of, 96;
Sabbath observance in the, 254; provi-
sions for payment of, 300, 301, 448; temper-
ance and drunkenness in, 415, 416; tributes
to, 456, 587; punishment of with holding
payment, 491; Gen. Grant commissioned
sieutenant-general in, 493, 494; no loss in,
by emancipation, 609; thanked by the
Union National Convention, 630, 538; pro-
hibition against trading with the enemy,

581.
United States Bank, the subject discussed,

I, 21-31; constitutionality of, 229, 270; Con-
gressional action on, 229; re-charter Act,
255, 256; Douglas's position on, 271; the
Cincinnati platform on, 299; Jackson's
course in regard to, 299. See also BANK

OF UNITED STATES.
United States bonds, and the national bank-

ing system, II, 264, 265, 301; proposed is-
sue of, for compensation for fiberated
slaves, 270, 271.
United States census, partizanship in ap-
pointing deputies for that of 1840, I, 51;
Rhett's objection to, 130; the seventh, II,
106.
United States Christian Commission, meet-

ing at Washington, II, 311.
United States Circuit Court of California,

resolution of House of Representatives
regarding, II, 178, 179.
United States circuit courts, uniform dis-

tribution of, II, 98; proposed abolition
of, 98.
United States commerce, protection of, I,

125.
United States Congress, powers of, to con-

trol slavery, I, 16, 273, 280, 642; powers, at-
titude, and actions of, respecting creation
of a national bank, 30, 229, 270, 299, 455 ;
organization of, Dec. 6, 1847, 96; position
on the Mexican question, 100, 101, 104; po-

sition on Texas boundary question, 102,
104; Story on powers of, 127; public im-
provements not among powers conferred
by Constitution, 127, 128; should be un-
hampered in legislation, 134; sole juris-
diction over tariff and protection, 134;
question of rigat of, to legislate on slav-
ery in newly acquired territory, 143;
powers and actions regarding slavery in
District of Columbia, 147-149, 190, 642, II,
144; position on public-land question, I,
150; jurisdiction over slavery in Territo-
ries, 228, 242, 246, 367, 426, 475, 476, 627; pro-
hibition of slavery in the Territories, 240–
245; must support rights given under the
Constitution, 359; cannot alter social and
political relations of negroes and whites,
370; cannot dictate a constitution to a new
State, 424; slavery agitation to be ban-
ished from, 503; limitation of power of,
under the Constitution, to prohibit im-
portation of slaves, 504; appropriations
for Mexican war, 514; repeals law prohib-
iting slavery in Territories, 540; probib-
its African slave-trade, 540; Douglas on
the jurisdiction of, to organize Territo-
ries, 547; recognizes Ordinance of 1787,
650, 600 ; cannot confer what it does not
possess, 553; refuses to Indiana the right
to own slaves, 571; power of, to admit
Territories as States, 587, 588; passage of
early amendments to the Constitution,
603; Frank Blair defeated for, 623; passes
act enforcing prohibition of slavery in
Northwest Territory, 627; called upon to
suppress African slave-trade,

636; author-
ized to make appropriations for river and
harbor improvements, 637 ; power to levy
war vested in, 643; power of Executive to
influence action of, 679; should originate
and perfect measures without external
bias, 679; fealty of members to the Con-
stitution, II, 2; legislation necessary to
raise an army, 16; convening extra ses-
sion of, 34 ; submission of matter of cali
for troops to, 42; influence of members of,
regarding appointments, 45; messages to,
65-68, 93-106, 109-111, 113, 117, 118, 120, 122,
123, 125, 127-130, 138-140, 144, 145, 151, 163-
165, 178, 196, 203, 207, 209, 261-281, 284, 290,
297, 300, 301, 303, 305, 307, 312, 313, 445-457,
461, 465, 466, 468, 473, 483, 486, 487, 496, 497,
506, 514, 516, 529, 603-616, 625, 636, 636, 639, 652;
relied on to ratify acts of the Administra-
tion, 59; asked for 400,000 men and $400,000,-
000, 60; recommends a day of fasting, 73, 74;
favors compensated emancipation, 156;
appropriates money for colonization pur-
poses, 222; impossibility of uniting on pol-
Icy of emancipation, 234; Degotiations for
election of representatives to, from Louisi-
ana, 247; resolution of, July 11, 1862, re-
specting promotion of 'naval officers, 278;
submission of papers to, regarding inter-
national agricultural exhibition at Ham-
burg, 297 ; joint resolution, Jan. 14-15,
1863, providing for payment of army and
navy, 300, 301; power to regulate the cur-
rency, 301; the restraining hand of, 303 ;
transmission of papers to, relating to con-
Bular courts in Turkey, 305; submission
to, of despatch from V. B. consul at Liv-
erpool, regarding distressed operatives at
Blackburn, Eng., 312; submission to, of
New Mexico's acceptance of benefits of
act to provide for colleges of agriculture
and mechanic arts, 313; refunds the fine
imposed on Gen. Jackson in New Orleans,
351; prospective return of members from
Louisiana to, 380; power to provide means
to do things ordered by the Constitution,

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indorsed by the Republi
pledge to support the, 63
Fifth Amendment, 636; m
publican National Conve
authorizes Congress to
tions for river and harbo
837; authorizes Congress
in District of Columbia
upon power of Congress
642; power of levying
support of the penple fo
689; power of the Exect
Presidential oath presc
fealty of members of C
forcement of art. 4, sec.
older than, 3: contains to
petuity of Federal Unic
stitutional rights been
not expressly provide re
in the Territories, 5; rig!
of,6; proposed amendi
interference with domes
States, 6; provision fo
duties throughout the
visions regarding habea
348, 361, 406; detines and
and powers of the neve
does not contain the ter
eignty,” 62; the author

389; the conscription act passed by, 389 ; quired territory, 143; supersedes Articles
authorizes the President to suspend ha- of Confederation, 181; rights of slavehold-
beas corpus, 407, 542; question of Frank ers under, 187; representation of slave
Blair's membership in, 433, 434; declares holders under, 197, 198; Lincoln's adherence
forfeitures and confiscations and libera- to, 198, 678, 687, 695; language of, in regar
tion of slaves, 442; provision as to mem- to slaves and slavery, 202, 504, 610, 615,
bers returned to, by reconstructed States, 623, 624; position of slavery under, 212, 24,
444; recommended to legislate, in regard 280, 296-298; position on slave-trade and
to public lands, favorably to soldiers and slaveholding, 206; provisions of, as to
sailors, 452; Capt. John Rogers recom- Presidential candidates, 222; no restrie
mended for thanks of, 456; subject of tions on polygamy in, 227; interpretation
Freedmen's Aid Societies brought before, of amendments to, 228; Douglas on 4
461 ; advised to make appropriation for saults on, 229; Pres. Jackson on inter
indemnity for schooner Glen, 468; corre- pretation of, 229, 256, 482; the negto's
spondence submitted to, concerning pres- share in framing, 230; position of nesto
entation to master of schooner High- under, by virtue of Dred Scott decision,
lander, 486; transmission to, of report of 242, 285, 405, 445, 446, 497, 498; the Dred Scott
Hamburg agricultural exhibition, 473; decision and, 243; restraint of, upon
message to, regarding claims pending be- power of States over slavery, 244; ita
tween the United States and Ecuador, framers and thetr position regardine
497; right to arrange offices, 504; submis- slavery, 253, 273, 487, 488, 504, 505, 511, 594,
sion to, of report of Engineer Stuart on 600; influence upon, 259; Jefferson on, 270;
method of passing gunboats from tide- limitations of, on State rights, 278, 279, 284;
water to the lakes, 506; transmission to, formation of free and slave States under,
of note from Lord Lyons, regarding treat- 283; recognizes property in slaves, 357-
ment of British naval officers at Norfolk, 359, 426; what it means to support the

,
514; transmission to, of papers of the 358, 359; declaration of equality the funds
East Tennessee Relief Association, 516 ; mental principle of free institutions, 389;
question of Judge Kelley's renomination must be supported, 369, 575, 593 ; guarai
to, 636; declines to admit representatives teed right to hold slaves in Territories,
from Arkansas, 539; nomination of Ar- 414-417; courts will find remedy for en
nold to, 540, 541; concurrent resolutioni of, sion of right guaranteed by, 616; right
regarding day of humiliation and prayer, of property under the Fifth Amendment.
543, 544; bill to guarantee a republican 416, 417; Lincoln's denial of the Supreme
form of government, 545; authorizes ap- Court's correct construction of, in Dred
pointment of State recruiting agents, Scott case, 417; text of the Fifth Amend
551; efforts of postmaster of Philadelphia ment, 417; the supreme law of the land,
to defeat renomination of Judge Kelley 417, 431, 445, 473, 474, 553, II, 389; prae
to, 558; authorizes the purchase of prod- tice of early government under, to ex
ucts of the insurrectionary States, 579; clude slavery from free Territories, I
passes act for admission of Nevada, 592; 421; how negro is excluded from belle
Capt. Winslow recommended for tbanks fits of art. 4, sec. 2, 426; art. 6, t. 4
of, for destruction of the Alabama, 603 ; discussed, 445–447; governs alike in the
Lieut. Cushing recommended for thanks and slave States, 451; slavery in Dio
of, 603, 604; provides for remodeling In- trict of Columbia and the, 463; rights of
dian system in California, 611 ; provisions States under, in regard to slavery, 172;
for pensions, 611; proposed amendment rights of States and Territories under, in
to the Constitution abolishing slavery, regard to slavery, 477, 478; Dred Scott de
612; admission of members from Coufed

cision opposed to art. 4, sec. 2, 486; right:
erate States, 614, 615; transmission to, of of Kansas under, 489, 490; Senate and Exec-
treaties between United States and Bel- utive independent of each other under,
gium, 625; passage of constitutional 492; basis of representation under, 54;
amendment for abolishment of slavery, provision for reclamation of fugitire
633 ; draft of message to, recommending slaves, 504, 512, 513, 593, 658-660, 11, 2; Lin-
appropriation of money for Southern coln denies authority to hold slaves in
states, 635, 636; joint resolution declaring Territories under the, I, 512; disregard ot

,
certain States not entitled to representa- by Ohio Republican Convention, 6;
tion in the Electoral College, 639; com- change in government from the Cou-
mittee from, announces result of electoral federation to the, 550; how affected by the
count, 640; question of admission to, of Dred Scott decision, 562; no

power under

.
members from reconstructed States, 673. to interfere with slavery, 559; African
See also CONGRESS OF THE CONFEDERA- slave-trade and, 565; contains nothing in
TION; U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES; regard to slavery in Territories, 565; Re-
U. 8. SENATE.

publican Party's attitude toward slavery
United States Constitution, reverence for, under, 569, 636, 675; forbids interference

I, 15; what constitutes "express au- with slavery in States where it exists,
thority," 30; general authority conferred

574, 593; the patent clause in, 577; the
by, upon Congress, 30; its phrase“ neces- frame of our government, 599; question of
sary and proper,” 31 ; powers conferred its restraint on Federal government as to
by. 30, 31; interchange of views with slavery in Territories, 699 et seq.; passant
Herndon on Mexican question, 111, 112; of the early amendments to, 603; 10
Democratic theory as to powers of gen- visions for amending, 603; no violation at,
eral government over internal improve- proposed by Republican Party, 609; no
ments, 123; amendment of, 124; the ques- right guaranteed by, to carry slaves into
tion of public improvements in regard to, Territories, 609-612; does not distinctly and
126. 127; Story on powers conferred on expressly affirm the right of property in a
Congress, 127; Jefferson's proposed amend- slave, 610; frained to exclude the idea of
ment to, in regard to public improve- property in man, 610, 616; slave-trade er
ments, 127; advisability of amending, isted at formation of.623; slavery existed at
129; question of grant of power to Con- formation of, 623, 624;

intent of, not to show
gress to legislate on slavery in newly ac- any trace of slavery in the country,

antee to each State of re
ment, 65, 333, 408, 454, 457
to acquire territory, 102; F
on the President by the,
rection, 164; provision as
proposed amendments
preservation of, 302, 370.
of treason, 346; restriction
by the plotters of the sece-
no distinction of lines wi
tary arrests may be mad
punishment of desertion
distinguishes between til
times of rebellion, 350, 36
of Ohio State Demoer
on the President's po-

difference of, in peace an-
380; provisions in, for pre
lic safety, 361; express
in, 388, 389; investa con
with law of war in time
bond of service betwee
and the people, 397; POF
under, to grant repries:
442; authorizes the Exer
pardoning power, 454;
oath regarding, 508: its
nation, 508 ; proposed ame
hibiting slavery, 529.5
autbority of, recognized
National Convention, 523,
tion of the President to de
536; the President has no
to interfere with conduct
elections, 588; proposed E
abolisling slavery, 612, 61
amendment to, abolishing
ratification of Amendment
633, 034; ratification of Thirt

ment, 674.
United States consuls, increa-

responsibilities growing ou

II, 41.
United States courts, treaso

134.
United States forts, Confedera

II, 346
United States government, to

L, 178, 5091ot necessarily
men, 257, made for white
405, 484, 195; no right in Fed
influence state matters, 49

indorsed by the Republican Party, 635;
pledge to support the, 635; ordination of
Fifth Amendment, 636; maintained by Re-
publican National Convention of 1860, 636;
authorizes Congress to make appropria-
tions for river and harbor improvement,
637; authorizes Congress to abolish slavery
in District of Columbia, 642; limitation
upon power of Congress to interfere with,
642; power of levying war under, 643;
support of the people for the, 677, 680-683,
689; power of the Executive under, 679;
Presidential oath prescribed by, II, 1;
fealty of members of Congress to, 2; en-
forcement of art. 4, sec. 2, 2; the Union
older than, 3; contains foundation of per-
petuity of Federal Union, 3; have con-
stitutional rights been denied ? 4; does
not expressly provide regarding slavery
in the Territories, 5; right of amendment
of, 6; proposed amendment as to Federal
interference with domestic institutions of
States, 6; provision for uniformity of
duties throughout the country, 35; pro-
visions regarding habeas corpus, 60, 347,
348, 361, 406; defines and limits the rights
and powers of the several States, 61, 62;
does not contain the term “State sover-
eignty,” 62; the author of, 64; its guar-
antee to each State of republican govern-
ment, 65, 333, 408, 454, 455; power under,
to acquire territory, 102; powers conferred
on the President by the, in case of insur-
rection, 164; provision as to attainder, 211;
proposed amendments to, 270, 271, 276;
preservation of, 302, 370, 608; definition
of treason, 346; restrictions of, counted on
by the plotters of the secession, 347; makes
no distinction of lines within which mili-
tary arrests may be made, 348; sanctions
punishment of desertion by death, 349;
distinguishes between times of peace and
times of rebellion, 350, 360, 361; strictures
of Ohio State Democratic Convention
on the President's position regarding
difference of, in peace and in insurrection,
360; provisions in, for preserving the pub-
lic safety, 361; express power to draft
in, 388, 389; invests commander-in-chief
with law of war in time of war, 397; the
bond of service between the President
and the people, 397 ; power of President
under, to grant reprieves and pardons,
442; authorizes the Executive to use the
pardoning power, 454; the Presidential
oath regarding, 508; its oneness with the
nation, 508 ; proposed amendment to, pro-
hibiting slavery, 529, 530; paramount
authority of, recognized by the Union
National Convention, 529, 530; authoriza-
tion of the President to demand opinions,
536 ; the President has no power under,
to interfere with conduct of Presidential
elections, 588; proposed amendment to,
abolishing slavery, 612, 613; passage of
amendment to, abolishing slavery, 633;
ratification of Amendment by the States,
633, 634; ratitication of Thirteenth Amend

ment, 674.
United States consuls, increased labors and

responsibilities growing out of the war,

II, 447.
United States courts, treason in the, II,

124.
United States forts, Confederate seizures of,

II, 346.
United States government, foundation of,

I, 178, 599; not necessarily made for white
men, 257; made for white men, 284, 343,
405, 434, 495; no right in Federal power to
influence State matters, 491; use of Fed-

eral power to control elections, 491, 492;
principle of, 541; functions of, 593; the
slavery question as treated by the fathers
of, 599 et seq.; question of its control over
slavery in the Territories, 599 et seq.; pow-
ers as to restriction of slavery, 608, 609;
should aid in construction of a Pacific
railroad, 637; must not run the churches,
II, 291, 464, 465, 491, 498, 521, 543; financial
embarrassment of, 301 ; must be perpetu-
ated, 342; has no motives of revenge in
punishment, 499; the President's strug.
gles to maintain, 586; advantage of citi-
zens being creditors of, 608; should control
bank-noto circulation, 609; strength of,

640.
United States House of Representatives,

Lincoln elected to, I, 89, 597, 642; nomina-
tion of Winthrop for Speaker, McCormick
for postmaster, Sargent for sergeant-at-
arms, and Homer for doorkeeper, 96; re-
marks in Jan. 5, 1848, on carriage of mails,
98, 99; speech in, Jan. 12, 1848, on Mexican
question, 100-107 ; report from Committee
on Post-Office and Post-Roads, Jan. 19,
1848, 108, 109; reports, March 9, 1848, from
Committee on Post-Office and Post-Roads,
113-115; remarks on report from Com-
mittee on Public Lands, March 29, 1848,
116, 117; remarks on report from military
Committee, March 29, 1848, 116, 117; re-
marks on report from Committee on Judi-
ciary, March 29, 1848, 116, 117; remarks, May
11, 1848, on admission of Wisconsin, 118-120;
Committee on Public Lands, bill before,
for grant to Illinois for internal im-
provements, 120; Committee of the whole
on the State of the Union, speech, June
20, 1848, on Civil and Diplomatic Appro-
priation bill, 122-131; Whig caucus, 131 ;
remarks, June 28, 1848, on salary of judgeof
Western Virginia, 133, 134; speech in, July
27, 1848, on sundry topics, 135-147; Com-
mittee on District of Columbia, instruc-
tions to, for bill to abolish slavery in the
District, 148, 149; speech, Feb. 13, 1849, on
railroad and canal grants of public lands,
149–151; election of Henry Clay to, 169;
Clay elected Speaker, 169, 170; votes for
prohibition of slavery in Missouri, 182;
defeats Senate bill for extension of Mis-
souri line, 184, 188; Democratic need of
electing Speaker, 211 ; action on acquisi.
tion of territory from Mexico, 449; messa-
ges to, II, 66, 69-71, 107, 110, 128, 141, 142, 144,
146, 157, 175, 178–180, 183, 205, 292, 299, 300, 309,
310, 483, 490, 516-518,624, 626, 640-649; treason
in, 124; censures Secretary Cameron, 165;
memorial to, regarding Erie and Oswego
canals, 180; legislation regarding circulat-
ing médium in District of Columbia, 186 ;
requested to postpone adjournment, 208;
asks for correspondence relating to for-
eign affairs, 261; election of Speaker in,
March 18, 1863, 316; principle of its con-
struction, 391; act relating to election of
members of, 395, 396; act providing for
formalities of organization of, 432, 433;
organization of, 457; committee of, to in-
vestigate New York custom-house, 481 ;
communication to, regarding resigna-
tions of Gens. Blair and Schenck, 516,
517; transmission of papers to, relating
to resignation and reinstatement of Gen.
Blair, 518; fails to pass Amendment to
the Constitution abolishing slavery, 612;
return of joint resolution

respecting in-
ternal revenue act to, without approval,
624; transmission to, of papers respecting
interview between Col. Key and Gen.
Cobb, 626 ; resolutions :

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75

t

Te

(

to, by Gen. Banks, 625,
admission of Senators
626; proclamation conver
sion, Feb. 17, 1865, 652. 65
1839, Jan. 4, handling of

foreign countries, I,
1861, July 19, quasi-armis
July 25, imprisonment

den, II, 70.
July 25, instructions tc

abroad, II, 70.
July 31, appointment

71, 72
(Dec. 14), regarding D
1862, Feb. 5, presentatie

citizens at the French
Mar. 11, railway syster

137.
Mar. 13, attempted seia

chet, II, 278.
Apr. 17, Lieut. Charles

146.
Apr. 22, Brig.-Gen. Stor
May 12, Mexican affairs
Dec. 5, Indian barbariti

II, 279.

109.

1847, Dec. 22, Mexican affairs, I, 97, 98. tion of its operations against Charles-
1861, July 9, San Domingo, II, 66.

ton, 463; gain by emancipation, 50;
July 13, blockading, privateering, and thanked by the Union National Conven-
recognition, II, 107.

tion, 530, 538; prohibition against trading
July 13, Asiatic coolie-trade, II, 110. with the enemy, 581; proposed extension
July 22, requesting copy of correspon- upon the Great Lakes, 607; strength of,
dence with foreign powers relating 609; captures by, 609; proceeds from sale

to insurrection in the South, II, 69. of condemned prizes, 609; refusal of priv-
July 24, imprisonment of police com- ileges and immunities to ships of, in for
missioners of Baltimore, II, 70.

eign ports, 671, 672.
July 25, requesting copy of correspon. United States Navy Department, Captain
dence with foreign powers respecting Porter ordered to report to, II, 46; Cab
maritime rights, II, 69.

inet meeting at, April 21, 1861, 164; Bet-
July 31, foreign commerce, II, 107.

retary of, empowers citizens of New
Aug. 1, imprisonment of loyal citizens York to act for his department in the
by Southern force, II, 71.

public defense, 164; disbursements for,
Dec. 4, European intervention in Mexi. fiscal year 1861-62, 265; report of the bed
co, II, 107.

retary, 609, 610; expenditure of, 609, 616;
1862, Jan, 22, II, 128.

question of creating rank of vice-admiral
Feb. 24, insurgent privateers in foreign in, 610; question as to duties of the beo-
ports, II, 146.

retary, 623; question as to proceeding of
Mar. 3, condition of Mexico, II, 144. naval courts martial, 623.
Apr. 4, financial measures in foreign United States notes, issue of, II, 186, %4;
countries, II, 141.

directions to the Secretary of the Treasury
May 20, Egyptian indemnity, II, 157. to issue one hundred millions of dollars,
May 22, Mexican affairs, II, 157.

300, 301.
June 2, Gov. Stanley, of North Carolina, United States of Colombia, formation of
II, 175.

II, 300; diplomatic intercourse with, 146;
June 9, U. S. circuit court for Califor- claims convention with, 604.
nia, II, 178, 179.

United States officers, arrested in South-
June 9, reorganization of medical de- ern States, II, 39.
partment of the army, II, 183.

United States Post-Office, statistics of, II,
Júly 9, foreign relations, II, 205.

99, 100.
Dec. 5, affairs in Mexico, II, 309.

United States property, seizure of, in south-
Dec. 22, affairs in Mexico, II, 292.

ern States, II, 39, 55.
1863, Jan. 5, affairs of New Granada, II, United States Senate, investigation of Post-
299, 300.

Office Department, 1834, I, 34; bill appro
1864, Feb. 8, touching arrest of U. 8. Con- priating public lands for internal improre-

sul-General to British North Ameri- ments in Illinois, 119, 120; elections of
can Provinces, II, 483.

Henry Clay to, 169, 170; votes against pro
Feb. 26, reënlistment of veteran volun- hibition of slavery in Missouri, 18; de
teers, II, 490.

feats Wilmot Proviso, 184 ; obstructa Call-
See also U.S. CONGRESS.

fornia's admission, 185; its position on the
United States lands, remarks on purchase slavery question, 201; Lincoln's aspira
of, by Illinois, Jan, 17, 1839, I, 19, 20.

tions to a seat in, 209, 211, 520; Lincoln's
United States laws, obstruction of, in South- candidacy for, 209, 240, 485; duty of a well-
ern States, II, 34.

ber, 212; competition of candidates to
United States mails, remarks on carriage senatorship in Ilinois, 274, 275; arrange

of, in U. 8. House of Representatives, ments for filling Shields's place, 279, 22,
Jan. 5, 1848, I, 98, 99; to be maintained, 286, 287; action on legislation by Territo-
II, 4; possibility of withdrawal of, from ries in regard to slavery, 476; question il
the seceded States, 33; continuance of, of admission of States in regard to pope
promised in inaugural address, 56; stop- lation, 491; veto power of, 492; Es
page of, 164; suspension of, in insurrec- ecutive no right to control, 192; Pettit's
tionary States, 266.

statement about the Declaration of lude
United States Military Academy, recom- pendence, 499, 500; Lincoln's preference
mendations for, II, 97.

for a term in, rather than the Presidency,
United States moneys, Confederate seizures 594; Senator Mason wears homespun to,

of, II, 11.
United States Naval Academy, services of,

626; messages to, II, 23, 25, 70, 72, 109, 121,

137, 146, 147, 161, 186, 197, 278, 279, 280, 324
II, 451.

806, 309, 310, 312, 457, 459, 466, 167, 169, 103,
United States Navy, general benefits of, I,
125; its raison d'être, 125; scattered dis-

476, 478, 493, 495,615, 649-651; treason in, 1

legislation regarding circulating medium
position of, II, 16; inquiry as to using ships in District of Columbia, 186; Dotified al
of, to reinforce the revenue service, 24, 25;
Seward advises recall of, from foreign

the President's disapproval of act to pro

vide for additional medical officers of the
stations, 29; defection of officers of, 65;
scattered at foreign stations, 55; calls for

volunteer service, 197; requested to pat-
additions to, 59; resignations in, confined

pone adjournment, 208; proclamation cott
to its officers, 64; proposed reorganiza-

vening, Feb. 28, 1863, 312, 313; requests the
tion of, 97; creation of a new, 97; opera-

President to appoint national fast-das

,
tions of, 97, 449; detailing officers from

319; question of Senator Sebastian's me
the retired list for active service, 122, 125;

sumption of his seat, 879; convention sub-

mitted to, 445; transmission of papers to
act to promote the efficiency of, Dec. 457 ; resolution of, March 11, 1863, relating
21, 1861, 125; Sabbath observance in, 254 ;
regulations for promotion in, 278; pro-

to persons in government employ, 19:
vision for payment of, 300, 301 ; prompt

transmission of documents to, relating to
payment of, 448; strength of, 450; river

pursuit of Sioux Indians into Hudson Bay
force of, 450; suggestions in regard to

Territory, 476 ; passes Amendment to the
the training of seamen, 451; effect of the

Constitution abolishing slavery, €12; notti
draft on, 451 ; tributes to, 456, 587; ques-

ination of Chase, as chief justice, sent to
616; paper relating to Louisiana submitted

Dec. 15, requesting rer

Johnson, II, 283.
1863, Jan. 13, capture of

with contraband of wa
surgents, II, 306.
(Jan. 20), exportation 0:

war for French army in
Jan. 80, II, 309.
Feb, 5, death of Gen. Wa

309.
Feb. 9, visit of M. Mercie

II, 309.
Feb. 10, mediation and

310.
Feb. 12, II, 310.
Feb. 26, correspondence

men of England, II, 31

Mar. 11, persons in gove

II, 459.
Dec. 16, treatment of

captured by Confeder
1864, Jan. 20, fire at Santia

Jan. 26, exchange of pri
Jan. 28, colonization of
Feb. 4, reciprocity with

Islands, II, 478.
Mar. 1, Union Pacific ra
Apr. 30, rights of colore

See also U. 8. CONGRE
United States Statutes, revi
United States Supreme Cou
od constitutionality of a na
30, 249, 255, 270 ; sanctioned
74; arbiter of the Constitut
las on resistance to decisio
case, 228, 23; the Dred Sco
244, 2:4, 603, 610; former deci
to that in the Dred Scott e-
gon's position on right to

nate branch of government,
on, 289, 270; Lincoln's oppo
Scott decision, 283, 284; man
of a decision of, 298; Lincol
conspiracy against, 303, 313
HER, 47, 485; decision as to r
tories to exclude slavery, 3
las': adherence to its decis
473,518; Douglas's criticism
strictures on Dred Scott dee
ciston as to Congressional I
Klavery in Territories, 357; At
under decision in Dred Scott
derides against power of Te
clude slavery, 415, 416; Linet

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